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ashlee's mom

Sodium Fluoride Chewables

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Hi, I am hoping someone can help me! We recently moved and now our water does not have fluoride in it so my kids need suplements. Their new doctor prescribed chewables for my daughter, but I don't see any listing other than Sodium Fluoride. How do I find out what it has in it? Is there a way to contact the company that makes it, or do I have to rely on the phamacy? I am still pretty new to this, so I really appreciate any help! I have never had to deal with prescriptions before!

Thanks,

Michelle

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Michelle,

I don't know about the presciption, but I would do research on fluoride before I would give my child a supplement with fluoride in it. Below is a link to a web page that gives a lot of good information about fluoride. I encourage you to take a look at it and make a informed decision about fluoride.

I hope this helps, sorry I can't answer your specific question.

http://www.mercola.com/article/links/fluoride_links.htm

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Take the fluoride back to the pharmacist, ask them to give you the orginial packaging or photocopy the ingredient panel. Either they -- or you -- should call the company and ask for any clarification of ingredients. Our fluoride tabs are gluten-free, but that doesn't mean anything to you! If the pharmacist is going to call, be there when they do it. (so you know they really did call)

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I myself are very, very happy that we don't have fluoridated water. It is a nerve toxin and NOBODY should be ingesting it. It lowers IQ and poisons your body. My oldest daughter, who lives in Ottawa (and the water there is fluoridated), has chosen to only use bottled water, so she won't poison her children, her husband and herself with the city water.

There is absolutely no evidence whatsoever that fluoride will help prevent cavities. Staying away from sugar, soda pop, too many starches and sweets will help prevent them.

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By the way, the article on fluoride poison mongers is a sham. The fluoride in city water supplies has nothing in common with naturally occurring fluoride. It is a toxic byproduct from the fertilizer industry. Before they were able to sell it to put into our water supply, they had to get rid of it as toxic waste.

Obviously, there are many people who would rather put out lies about fluoride, because otherwise our governments would have to admit that they have been poisoning the population for all these years. Dentists will have to admit that it does nothing against cavities, and the people selling it now will have to go back to paying to get rid of it (not to mention all the lawsuits from people who's health was ruined by this stuff).

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There are concerns that the consumption of unfluoridated bottled and tank water may put children at increased risk of developing caries. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between nonpublic water consumption (either from bottles or rainwater tanks) and socioeconomic status (SES) and both deciduous and permanent caries experience. METHODS: A random sample of children enrolled in the School Dental Service of South Australia participated in the study (response rate = 71.8%, n = 9988). RESULTS: Forty-five per cent of children had greater than 50% lifetime consumption of nonpublic water while 36% of children had 0% lifetime consumption. Increased use of nonpublic water occurred for children from lower socioeconomic groups, two-parent families and children from nonmetropolitan areas, with these results most likely a result of the residential location of the children. Multivariate modelling revealed a significant positive relationship between deciduous caries experience and consumption of nonpublic water, even after controlling for the age and sex of the child, SES and residential location. This relationship was significant only for those children with 100% lifetime availability of fluoridated water. The effect of consumption of nonpublic water on permanent caries experience was not significant. It is postulated that these findings may result from the lower caries activity in the permanent dentition of children aged 10-15 and possible dietary confounders. CONCLUSION: Recommendations are made for the addition of fluoride to bottled water, especially with regard to the oral health of younger children.

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