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Adhd? Gluten Sensitivity? Any Help Would Be Great-

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My son was diagnosed with ADHD - heis 6.

I just received the following results back from Enterolab.Do you think the gluten sensitivity could be causing the ADHD like behaviors.

I am not sure what the results all mean. I am meeting with my sons docotor this week.

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0302

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 8,8)

) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 30 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 13 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score <300 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 19 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0302

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 8,8)

Interpretation of Fecal Antigliadin IgA: Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

Interpretation of Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA: You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal.

Interpretation of Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of the main genes that predispose to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8. Having two copies of a gluten sensitive or celiac gene means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac disease may be more severe.

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My son was diagnosed with ADHD - heis 6.

I believe that people have seen ADHD behavior improve on the gluten free diet. Hopefully someone more knowledgable will come along.

I have also heard about sugars affecting behavior. I don't know about his eating habits but cutting out refined sugars could help a great deal too.

I'm not sure if casein causing behavioral changes in people or not.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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Food sensitivities are notorious for behavioral symptoms. However, each individual varies, so its hard to say what food until you do elimination and challenges.

Seems like gluten and milk free would be a good place to start, and then perhaps wait on anything else until you see what the response is.

Like we said on the other post, if he is still on gluten, now is the time to get a clear celiac diagnosis if you want and need one. Once you go gluten free the tests may be negative.


4/2007 Positive IGA, TTG Enterolab results, with severe malabsorption: Two DQ2 celiac genes--highest possible risk.

gluten-free since 4/22/07; SF since 7/07; 3/08 & 7/08 high sugar levels in stool (i.e. cannot break down carbs) digestive enzymes for carbs didn't help; 7/18/08 started SCD as prescribed by my physician (MD).

10/2000 dx LYME disease; 2008 clinical dx CELIAC; Other: hypothyroid, allergies, dupuytrens, high mercury levels

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First here is my limited credentials:

I am officially diagnosed with Adult ADD, by two independent doctors and have don trials on the strongest of meds (at the time) but presently unmedicated. I used to run a very large ADD/ADHD support group, and saw a lot variations in the standard cases and saw a lot of different treatments that were tried and failed. I do not have any official training at all but likely have seen more cases then most poeple living today.

There are a few catagories that I put AD/HD (that is the more common internet way to reference both at once) in too...

1) REAL AD/HD: This IMO is likely belongs under Autism, possibly as a variety of AS. It is real, and does respond in a limited way to stimulant medication. Not all ppl do well on meds, nor should all ppl take it. But in some cases it is the difference between living a successful normal life, and a life of disaster and early death. There is no cure, only equipping to deal with for LIFE. I am in this categorize.

2) Diet Caused AD/HD : This is, like the rest of the cases I am going to present not truely a mental disorder. There are many known things in our foods that cause AD/HD LIKE SYMPTOMS. This is always correctable by diet. Gluten-free is definitly one that some times helps, another is the Fiengold diet. Often only a careful food journal will show what needs to be avioded, paying specail attn to additves, dyes, etc. In this case the AD/HD is CURABLE.

3) Allergy cause AD/HD : Some allergens have been know to cause the same symptoms. Same thing as with the food. Careful journaling of symptoms and environment, and proper use of allergy medication can "cure" this case.

4) Medically caused : A big example of this is Anemia. It can hide behind an AD/HD label for ever if you are not careful Clear up the underlying medical issue, and the AD/HD is "cured".

5) Side effects of medication : My wife gets this from certain cold meds. Stop the meds (if you can) and the person is cured.

So to answer your question, yes gluten can (and I have seen it do) look like AD/HD. And in that case gluten-free diet will "cure" it. There is no way to know if that is the case until you try. Even if gluten is not the cause, it is likely aggravating the symptoms, and you will likely see some improvement on a gluten-free diet.

Good luck and feel free to ask any questions....


- Vincent -

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Do I think gluten (and casein) intolerance can cause ADHD-like behavior?

Oh yeah, definitely. I am excited for the potential behavioral change you may soon see!

My six-year-old is an incredible kid but has ADD-like symptoms...but they have decreased significantly since going gluten-free/CF.

Prior to this, he was evaluated over several visits at a pediatric behavioral clinic, and DURING the process of getting the behavioral eval (between visits), we discovered that he tested positive for four blood markers of Celiac disease. I tested positive, too.

We told the psych about it, and he was really great. He told us that he _had_ been on his way to diagnosing ADHD, but now he just wanted to take a break, wait several months, and see how DS does on the gluten-free diet.

Our son is intellectually gifted and humorous, but had a lot of trouble staying still in his kindergarten class, listening to the teacher, staying seated, etc. As a result, he was getting a "safe spot" (time out) practically every day, sometimes two or three a day. He was going to the "buddy room" or "recovery room" (escalated versions of the safe spot) at least once every week or two.

After a couple of weeks gluten-free, he went EIGHT days without a single "safe spot." The teacher called and wanted to know what we were doing. He finished the year with a much better record, with more friends and with a brighter countenance - he just looked happier.

He's still an above-average squirmy kid. And we're now going through some hard times with the diet. Some people get more sensitive on the diet (myself included bigtime), and he seems to be going through this now. He's having stomach aches where he was fairly asymptomatic before. It could be a secondary intolerance. But I also believe, based on my own experiences, that he might still be getting tiny amounts of gluten in some of his foods. Since I am so sensitive, I am looking forward to "testing" his snacks by eating them, but not until my infant son is weaned (he is both gluten sensitive and sensitive to rice and corn - so no snacks for either of us for the time being).

By the way, I am an adult who gets - uh huh - ADD-like symptoms when I'm on gluten. Not hyperactive, mind you. I just find it difficult to concentrate - I have to remove myself from all noise. I also get a lot of other bizarre symptoms. After a few days gluten/dairy free, I felt clearer than I had in 10 years - no joke. My friends and family can see that I am like a new person now. BUT...when I get a tiny bit of gluten (even cross contamination), my symptoms are there again. This level of sensitivity seemed to "kick in" after a few weeks on the gluten-free diet, and it's truly been the most challenging part for me. At first, I could eat processed foods like chips. But then, I started getting definite gluten symptoms from a lot of processed foods - unmistakable symptoms, like mouth sores and itchy, rashy elbows. So...watch out for this type of thing with your kiddo. Try to define a set of "really safe" foods that are whole foods like fruits, vegs, plain meats, etc. When your child seems symptomatic, pull back to this safe list and watch for improvement. Then reintroduce a suspect snack into this and watch for reactions. Easier said than done, I know.

For ADHD symptoms, I'd also supplement with a daily Omega 3 supplement. Just make sure it's gluten free. We supplement Omega 3s, zinc, pycnogenol (a strong antiosidant) and did so prior to the gluten-free diet. This all helped SOME, but the big changes came when we pulled out gluten and casein. We consider ourselves fortunate that his blood tests supported our actions. Your Enterolab results are a similar confirmation.

Best of luck! If you search for ADD or ADHD, you should find other message threads here that will give you hope.

April

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I agree with Vincent. Sometimes it resembles ADHD so closely, but is allergy induced--which is a good thing, in that respect. Take away the allergen, and you have your happy child back.


Deb

Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

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My son was diagnosed with ADHD - heis 6.

I just received the following results back from Enterolab.Do you think the gluten sensitivity could be causing the ADHD like behaviors.

I am not sure what the results all mean. I am meeting with my sons docotor this week.

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0302

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 8,8)

) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 30 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 13 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score <300 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 19 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0302

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 8,8)

Interpretation of Fecal Antigliadin IgA: Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

Interpretation of Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA: You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal.

Interpretation of Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of the main genes that predispose to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8. Having two copies of a gluten sensitive or celiac gene means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac disease may be more severe.

I can only speak for myself, but in my case, it absolutely caused most- if not all- of my ADD symptoms. I cannot adequately describe what it was like the first two weeks of going gluten free and the time since then. First of all, I had no idea that this would happen, so it was rather a shock. I began to notice things around me that I had never seen before, and my vision became more "wide angle." On the way to work those first few days I was so incredibly aware of everything that it was almost overwhelming. I was (and am) soooo much more observant than I had been.

In addition to being able to take in more of what's going on around me, in my mind I am able to sort through the information as it comes to me. In the past, things always seemed very random, and I struggled incredibly hard to make sense of things and organize them. I once saw a comic strip that depicted ADD as a file cabinet with drawers hanging open and papers flying everywhere. That's how it felt to me. I was forgetful and very easily distracted. It's a miracle that I made it through college and have always been a good teacher. However, this was what I focused on, ignoring things like housework and other important things. (This made me feel very inferior to anyone who was neat and organized, which is nearly everyone I know).

I have to close now, because I have to get to work, but I can relate some more things when I get home.

Have a good day.

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WOW..so many of us have so much in common. I am a school teacher. How I pulled that off is beyond me because....both myself and my son have "ADHD" and my son just had igG and igE bloodwork done and found he was allergic to wheat, milk, eggs, and intolerant of gluten! He also has sensitivites to many ohter foods....but most of them are due to the milk or gluten they have in them I am sure! I am working on developing a gluten free and dairy free diet for us (We are so much alike, I am sure I'll benefit from the same diet). Just tonight, I learned to make almond milk! Man, thats cool! But it is still frustrating having to read labels on EVERYTHING and trying to figure out ways to bake breads so that we can have a balanced diet with grains. As I just mentioned,I have discovered how to make a milk substitute, but that is not yet even the tip of the iceberg. ANy recipes or suggestions from anyone will be greatly appreciated. I certainly hope all the hard work I am going to put into this pays off by getting rid of the ADHD symptoms..or at least toning them down! I also hope this helps the gastrointestinal issues we've been having... and I have a feeling it will!

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My son has true ADHD PLUS ADHD induced by Gluten/Casein. My son was also diagnosed with Tourette's which has concurrent ADHD plus OCD (yipee huh?).

He ended up on a combination of anti-anxiety and stimulant medication (Celexa and Adderall XR). With the two medications it's like night and day. He's happier, he can organize himself, etc. All positive and so far we've seen absolutely no side effects. However we tried EVERYTHING (took until 2nd grade) to come to this conclusion because it should be a last resort. The anti-anxiety made his Tic's go away and the stimulant made him sleep better and the impulsivity (i.e. hitting everyone for no reason) go away. Given he's already on an all natural diet because we home school him and doesn't get artificial dyes and foods we didn't have many options left. Even the doctor wanted to medicate slowly because these drugs are COUNTER indicated in Tourettes - especially stimulants - because they can turn tic's into seizures. I'm going to assume since the medicine is working that my son has a true chemical imbalance and problems with neurotransmitters in his brain. HOPEFULLY being on the medicine for a while maybe someday he'll be able to come off of it. Only one of my five sons has the condition 'bad enough' to be medicated though.

We don't DARE get him any gluten/casein or artificial additives though because it makes him worse and we'd like to keep him onthe lowest does of medicine (which he is on now).

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I won't take up space quoting but I agree with VydorScope's whole post. In the past 5 years of trying to help my son and looking for answers I have come to see this in the same categories. Just trying to figure out which one he fits into.


Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11

Son: ADHD '06,

neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07

ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08

ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08

Gluten-free-Feb. '09

other food allergies

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First off, get an allergy test (blood) to take him off all allergic foods.

We had my son on meds (ritalin and adderall) until his seizure then we took him off and had the hardest time with no meds!! We had a suggestion for allergy testing and he's allergic to dairy, gluten, peanuts, beef...

He doesn't need meds anymore. We have to do a behavior chart in school but he's responded very well.

There is a gluten-free cookbook for ADHD and Autism and my mom has a very old book that's out of print about behavior and foods. Changing the diet will certainly help, but not one thing is a cure-all. and I agree with the omega 3's. fatty acids are good for the brain, also give a probiotic to help heal intestines.


Whole family is allergic to Gluten, eggs, dairy, most are allergic to garlic. Few other various allergies.

Did you know it's best to wait until 21 months to give a baby wheat??

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Well, it has been said that ADHD is related to Celiac, and that eating gluten free will help with autism and its effects. :mellow:


Gluten Free Since April 3, 2008

Diagnosed April 3, 2008

Endoscopy Sucks.

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I do recommend you see a peds gi doc and have the endoscopy done to substantiate the diagnosis.


Janet

DH diagnosed 4/2003. gluten free (for the most part) since.

Daughter diagnosed Celiac by biopsy after + endomysial and TTG Antibodies 6/08. (7 yo)

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