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NoGluGirl

Is Coca-cola No Longer Safe?

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Dear Fellow Celiacs and Gluten Intolerant Individuals,

I recently was informed that Coca-Cola goes by Codex standards. They are allowing 20ppm of gluten in their products! For highly sensitive individuals, this is very dangerous. One member said they got very ill from Coca-Cola recently. I thought I would warn everyone. I have since removed it from my safe list. So, please, if anyone received my safe list recently, please scratch off the Coke!

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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It's vital to determine if this is actually a change in anything they're doing, or a change in the wording due to the requirement of a definition of gluten free. Saying that they comply with 20ppm is not the same as saying they *have* 20ppm in their products. They more than likely haven't changed a darn thing (costs for that would be very high), but merely the wording to fall in line, legally, with the upcoming regulations.

getting to the bottom of that could be challenging, giving the legal delicacy of the situation.

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This post is wrong.

This is from Coke 12 days ago. The last part that talks about Codex is simply Coke's CYA for a few drinks that have in ingredients made in plants where gluten might be present. It's another way of saying we can't absolutely guarantee no CC. But the chance is very, very small. It's much more dangerous to eat at a restaurant.

We are able to confirm that Coca-Cola classic, caffeine free Coca-Cola

classic, Coca-Cola Blak, Coca-Cola C2, Coca-Cola with Lime, Coca-Cola

Zero, Coca-Cola Black Cherry Vanilla, Barq's root beer, caffeine free

Barq's root beer, diet Barq's root beer, diet Barq's Red Creme Soda, Diet

Coke Black Cherry Vanilla, Diet Coke, Diet Coke with Lime, Diet Coke

Plus, caffeine free Diet Coke, Diet Coke Sweetened with Splenda, Sprite,

Sprite Zero, vanilla Coke, Diet Vanilla Coke, cherry Coke, Diet Cherry

Coke, Cherry Coke zero, Fresca, DASANI, DASANI Lemon, Minute Maid Light

Lemonade, Minute Maid Active Orange Juice, Minute Maid Multi-Vitamin

Orange Juice, Nestea Sweetened Lemon Tea, Diet Nestea Lemon, Nestea Peach

Green Tea, Diet Nestea Peach Green Tea, Diet Nestea White Tea Berry

Honey, Nestea Lemon Sweet (hot fill), Enviga Sparkling Green Tea, Enviga

Berry Sparkling Green Tea, Simply Lemonade, Simply Limeade, POWERade

Mountain Blast, and our 100% juice products (without added ingredients)

ARE GLUTEN FREE.

Additionally, we can tell you that all of our other products meet

Codex's definition of gluten-free, which is currently less than 200 ppm

(parts per million) (0.02%) gluten. Codex is in the process of reviewing

this standard and we are monitoring the progress closely. At this time

the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not have a regulatory

definition of gluten-free.

We can assure you that the exact amount of gluten in all these other

products is very low - perhaps even zero. Some minor ingredients in

these products are manufactured from plants that gluten-sensitive people

could react to, so we are unable to state categorically that they are

totally gluten-free even though they may have undetectable levels of

gluten in them. The Codex guideline provides a very low threshold for

gluten content. However, extremely gluten-sensitive individuals should

discuss consumption of these products with their health care provider.

richard

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This post is wrong.

This is from Coke 12 days ago. The last part that talks about Codex is simply Coke's CYA for a few drinks that have in ingredients made in plants where gluten might be present. It's another way of saying we can't absolutely guarantee no CC. But the chance is very, very small. It's much more dangerous to eat at a restaurant.

We are able to confirm that Coca-Cola classic, caffeine free Coca-Cola

classic, Coca-Cola Blak, Coca-Cola C2, Coca-Cola with Lime, Coca-Cola

Zero, Coca-Cola Black Cherry Vanilla, Barq's root beer, caffeine free

Barq's root beer, diet Barq's root beer, diet Barq's Red Creme Soda, Diet

Coke Black Cherry Vanilla, Diet Coke, Diet Coke with Lime, Diet Coke

Plus, caffeine free Diet Coke, Diet Coke Sweetened with Splenda, Sprite,

Sprite Zero, vanilla Coke, Diet Vanilla Coke, cherry Coke, Diet Cherry

Coke, Cherry Coke zero, Fresca, DASANI, DASANI Lemon, Minute Maid Light

Lemonade, Minute Maid Active Orange Juice, Minute Maid Multi-Vitamin

Orange Juice, Nestea Sweetened Lemon Tea, Diet Nestea Lemon, Nestea Peach

Green Tea, Diet Nestea Peach Green Tea, Diet Nestea White Tea Berry

Honey, Nestea Lemon Sweet (hot fill), Enviga Sparkling Green Tea, Enviga

Berry Sparkling Green Tea, Simply Lemonade, Simply Limeade, POWERade

Mountain Blast, and our 100% juice products (without added ingredients)

ARE GLUTEN FREE.

Additionally, we can tell you that all of our other products meet

Codex's definition of gluten-free, which is currently less than 200 ppm

(parts per million) (0.02%) gluten. Codex is in the process of reviewing

this standard and we are monitoring the progress closely. At this time

the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not have a regulatory

definition of gluten-free.

We can assure you that the exact amount of gluten in all these other

products is very low - perhaps even zero. Some minor ingredients in

these products are manufactured from plants that gluten-sensitive people

could react to, so we are unable to state categorically that they are

totally gluten-free even though they may have undetectable levels of

gluten in them. The Codex guideline provides a very low threshold for

gluten content. However, extremely gluten-sensitive individuals should

discuss consumption of these products with their health care provider.

richard

Thanks for posting this.

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NoGluGirl....the info you have posted is not correct. The information that Richard posted (Lovgrov) is correct. Please please please be careful of what you are posting it can create un-necessary confusion and turmoil.

-Jessica :rolleyes:

This post is wrong.

This is from Coke 12 days ago. The last part that talks about Codex is simply Coke's CYA for a few drinks that have in ingredients made in plants where gluten might be present. It's another way of saying we can't absolutely guarantee no CC. But the chance is very, very small. It's much more dangerous to eat at a restaurant.

We are able to confirm that Coca-Cola classic, caffeine free Coca-Cola

classic, Coca-Cola Blak, Coca-Cola C2, Coca-Cola with Lime, Coca-Cola

Zero, Coca-Cola Black Cherry Vanilla, Barq's root beer, caffeine free

Barq's root beer, diet Barq's root beer, diet Barq's Red Creme Soda, Diet

Coke Black Cherry Vanilla, Diet Coke, Diet Coke with Lime, Diet Coke

Plus, caffeine free Diet Coke, Diet Coke Sweetened with Splenda, Sprite,

Sprite Zero, vanilla Coke, Diet Vanilla Coke, cherry Coke, Diet Cherry

Coke, Cherry Coke zero, Fresca, DASANI, DASANI Lemon, Minute Maid Light

Lemonade, Minute Maid Active Orange Juice, Minute Maid Multi-Vitamin

Orange Juice, Nestea Sweetened Lemon Tea, Diet Nestea Lemon, Nestea Peach

Green Tea, Diet Nestea Peach Green Tea, Diet Nestea White Tea Berry

Honey, Nestea Lemon Sweet (hot fill), Enviga Sparkling Green Tea, Enviga

Berry Sparkling Green Tea, Simply Lemonade, Simply Limeade, POWERade

Mountain Blast, and our 100% juice products (without added ingredients)

ARE GLUTEN FREE.

Additionally, we can tell you that all of our other products meet

Codex's definition of gluten-free, which is currently less than 200 ppm

(parts per million) (0.02%) gluten. Codex is in the process of reviewing

this standard and we are monitoring the progress closely. At this time

the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not have a regulatory

definition of gluten-free.

We can assure you that the exact amount of gluten in all these other

products is very low - perhaps even zero. Some minor ingredients in

these products are manufactured from plants that gluten-sensitive people

could react to, so we are unable to state categorically that they are

totally gluten-free even though they may have undetectable levels of

gluten in them. The Codex guideline provides a very low threshold for

gluten content. However, extremely gluten-sensitive individuals should

discuss consumption of these products with their health care provider.

richard

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I'm just curious what others plan to do when the codex definition kicks in January 2008. Will the gluten free label be good enough or will you still continue to call those companies to get more information? I'm also curious how many gluten free labels (such as Wall Mart brand) will disappear in Jan. 2008.

Just curious of others' opinions. :)

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I'm just curious what others plan to do when the codex definition kicks in January 2008. Will the gluten free label be good enough or will you still continue to call those companies to get more information? I'm also curious how many gluten free labels (such as Wall Mart brand) will disappear in Jan. 2008.

Just curious of others' opinions. :)

I know what you mean and I use the Wegmans gluten free labels all the time. They put a letter on their website about this whole new FDA labeling. It really brings up some good points. I posted it on here the other day. Even if you don't shop at Wegmans or care for the store it is a good read, it really makes you stop and think.

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Dear Richard and Everyone Else,

I appreciate your input on this. I was so confused. I keep hearing negative things about Codex. I had Coke before and was fine. As highly sensitive as I am, I would expect if there were any gluten traces, I would have gotten violently ill. I was on Gluten Free in SD and had no idea what was right and was not. Thank you everyone for your input.

I did not want to freak anyone out, but wanted to be cautious, because I had a list I send to newbies, and did not want anyone getting ill. I prefer to err on the side of caution.

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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I think we need to see what limits they set. 20 ppm, if that's what they set, is extremely low. 200 wouldn't be as good, of course. However, I have serious doubts that the things that are now generally safe will suddenly start adding small amounts of gluten.

Folks in Europe with celiac have been living with Codex for years now and they generally have a much easier time than we do with restaurants and processed foods. Believe me, all of this has been a huge advance from even just 6 years ago.

richard

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I think we need to see what limits they set. 20 ppm, if that's what they set, is extremely low. 200 wouldn't be as good, of course. However, I have serious doubts that the things that are now generally safe will suddenly start adding small amounts of gluten.

Folks in Europe with celiac have been living with Codex for years now and they generally have a much easier time than we do with restaurants and processed foods. Believe me, all of this has been a huge advance from even just 6 years ago.

richard

even than three years ago!

just to echo what Richard is saying, as we transition *into* having a definition for "gluten free", you're going to notice CYA statements that say things like "our products have less than 20ppm gluten" (or whatever the level is set at for what "gluten free" means, and we've already had the discussion as to why it is not legally/technically feasible to set that level to 0). it doesn't mean they're changing anything. it doesn't mean that they've got 19ppm. it means that they tested, and as accurately as the instruments can tell them, there's no gluten for it to find.

the transition wording may be scary, since we're not used to it and don't understand what it means on a "what does this mean to me?" level in the same way we're used to things the way they are now. but in the end, it may not amount to a hill of beans, other than giving us more information, which is a good thing!

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Dear Richard and Tiffany,

This is a huge relief! I am glad I can tell the newbies this was a false alarm! :) Codex gets confusing. I know one member from Europe does not trust the Codex standards. However, Europe tends to be more well-read on Celiac than the U.S. It really is disappointing how many physicians (especially G.I. doctors) know nothing about it!

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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Well, I'm here in Europe, and dealing with the codex standard, and even though I can't eat products that have 200ppm gluten, most gluten free products don't have that amount but much less. And it's clearly labelled. From my point of view, once you understand how a standard works, and how things are labelled, having a standard is better than not having any at all.

Pauliina

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Well, I'm here in Europe, and dealing with the codex standard, and even though I can't eat products that have 200ppm gluten, most gluten free products don't have that amount but much less. And it's clearly labelled. From my point of view, once you understand how a standard works, and how things are labelled, having a standard is better than not having any at all.

Pauliina

Dear Pauliina,

I am so grateful for your response! I know a guy on here from England who does not trust the Codex standards. That is why I was so confused. I was not sure what was safe and what was not. As you said, at least this way we have an idea!

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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