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cruelshoes

So What's In Your 72-hour Kit?

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Pre-celiac disease diagnosis, I was very good at keeping my 72-hour kit up to date. Here in the Seattle area, we are always being told about the catastrophic earthquake that is sure to come at any moment. I have been remiss in updating my foodstuffs in my kit. I am interested in what you keep in yours. Needs to be shelf stable and stay good for 6 months to a year, when it will be rotated out and replaced with fresh stock.

One of my biggest nightmares is something happening and I have to go to an emergency shelter and there is nothing to eat but chicken noodle soup and peanut butter sandwiches.

Here's to a prepared tomorrow!

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I've certainly never needed a 72 hour kit, but I would think Hormel chili would be great for that. It would probably be decent room temperature with some velveeta cheese (also shelf stable) in it. I don't know what the shelf life is on velveeta, but I know it's grossly long. Amy's and Progresso have some gluten free soups. Glutino pretzels and jif peanut butter make a good filling snack. Canned chicken and/or tuna lasts pretty long. Dried fruit and nuts would probably last a while, though I'm not sure how long.

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Being here in Texas I guess I really never thought about a 72 hour kit, Maybe at this moment a blow up boat incase of flooding, But were Im at I am high up enough to not need this item hopefully I wont, but anyway the only thing that we have to worry about that is catastophic enough is Tornatos that can come at any moment and even if I did have somekind of kit it just might get twisted away, but ok if I did have a 72 hr kit, Guhlia has is right Hormell chili would be good with Rice crakers and Pamalas Spice Ginger cookies would be good for me and my husband and daughter Oreo's cookies and Tuna, Pees and ready made noodles and lots of water and my Boxer would need some food as well.

donna

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Being here in Texas I guess I really never thought about a 72 hour kit, Maybe at this moment a blow up boat incase of flooding, But were Im at I am high up enough to not need this item hopefully I wont, but anyway the only thing that we have to worry about that is catastophic enough is Tornatos that can come at any moment and even if I did have somekind of kit it just might get twisted away, but ok if I did have a 72 hr kit, Guhlia has is right Hormell chili would be good with Rice crakers and Pamalas Spice Ginger cookies would be good for me and my husband and daughter Oreo's cookies and Tuna, Pees and ready made noodles and lots of water and my Boxer would need some food as well.

donna

Donna, I'm in Texas and I have to do disaster planning for my group at the office. In addition to hurricanes and torandos, we have to consider floods, power outages, chemical spills (typically truck or train hauling chemicals), contamination of water supply, grass fires and of course terrorist-induced mayhem. If nothing else, almost everyone lives near a railroad track or major freeway.

But those are some good ideas you named. I had to remind my guys recently that people tend to forget pet food and a bowl for pet water when they plan emergency supplies. Most people don't think about it.

I suspect most Celiacs could grab enough from their pantry to survive (even if it's not our favorite things) but it's good to think about it ahead of time. I would imagine especially if you have kids.

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One of my biggest nightmares is something happening and I have to go to an emergency shelter and there is nothing to eat but chicken noodle soup and peanut butter sandwiches.

Here's to a prepared tomorrow!

First, everyone should have enough food at home to take with them. Seventy-two hours or 3 days is what is recommended.

That said, when I worked at the Red Cross Center for hurricane Katrina, we provided almost anything. I know that we went out and got sugar free stuff the a woman that was diabetic. And when the local restaurants called to see how many meals were needed, many asked about special diets.

Now, we all know how hard it is for us to eat out. So you want some of your own food, but remember, most of the time it is just people like me helping to get people fed. And if you end up in Auburn, I can cover the gluten free stuff. :D

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My 72 hour kit is fairly extensive. DH and I each have a backpack in the spare bedroom (they are pretty easy to get to). Each contains 1 gal water, spare sweats, boots, socks, gloves, undies, sweater, rain slicker, space blanket, duct tape, plastic garbage bag (I know how to make a temp shelter from those), flint firestarter (hey you never know), some cash, 1st aid kit, flashlight (and batteries) rope, compass, whistle, signalling mirror, and at least 2 sharp knives. They also contain food. Everything storable for 2yrs ++. Nothing tastey, condensed milk, canned meat, gluten-free bars, etc. High fat and high calories. Hey you never know how long you'll have to live on that stuff. We live in Salem, Oregon. Floods have happened in the area, earthquakes, we live near some volcanoes (I heard that when mt st helens blew in the 80s Salem was COVERED in ash), all KINDS of stuff to be prepared for!!

When I was a kid I lived in the country and I remember at least 2 occasions when bad storms knocked the power out. We had an electric well for water. No power =no water. Since we lived out so far, it took 2+ weeks to fix the power (the priority was to fix the city power first). Once it was snowey, the other time we collected rainwater. None of our neighbors were prepared. We used our wood stove for heat and to cook (and boil water). We managed to keep everyone fed and watered (including livestock) till they fixed the power. What would we have done if unprepared??

Yes, here's to a prepared tomorrow!!

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My 72 hour kit is fairly extensive. DH and I each have a backpack in the spare bedroom (they are pretty easy to get to). Each contains 1 gal water, spare sweats, boots, socks, gloves, undies, sweater, rain slicker, space blanket, duct tape, plastic garbage bag (I know how to make a temp shelter from those), flint firestarter (hey you never know), some cash, 1st aid kit, flashlight (and batteries) rope, compass, whistle, signalling mirror, and at least 2 sharp knives. They also contain food. Everything storable for 2yrs ++. Nothing tastey, condensed milk, canned meat, gluten-free bars, etc. High fat and high calories. Hey you never know how long you'll have to live on that stuff. We live in Salem, Oregon. Floods have happened in the area, earthquakes, we live near some volcanoes (I heard that when mt st helens blew in the 80s Salem was COVERED in ash), all KINDS of stuff to be prepared for!!

When I was a kid I lived in the country and I remember at least 2 occasions when bad storms knocked the power out. We had an electric well for water. No power =no water. Since we lived out so far, it took 2+ weeks to fix the power (the priority was to fix the city power first). Once it was snowey, the other time we collected rainwater. None of our neighbors were prepared. We used our wood stove for heat and to cook (and boil water). We managed to keep everyone fed and watered (including livestock) till they fixed the power. What would we have done if unprepared??

Yes, here's to a prepared tomorrow!!

I think one of the keys to having a food supply is to have foods you will eat, and know how to prepare. A small camping stove/burner is important for cooking and boiling water. We have tons of those little propane bottles. I like that Adelle listed so many other things that you would need in a disaster, besides food.

Other things to add are bathroom staples, medications, feminine supplies, and yes PET FOOD! We were talking on another forum, and someone mentioned prepackaged meals. My own foods or whatever it's called is supposed to be good. I am gonna order a few and try them out. Lots of great ideas. I have a list of foods I am slowly adding to my food storage. :D helps keep track of everything!

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I also have toiletries as part of my first aid kit. :) we have a camping stove, with extra propane cartrages, but that isn't IN the pack itself. We don't pack pet food as the only pets we have are 2 guinea pigs. IF they survived any initial disaster, their cages would break and they'd be long gone. They also HATE being picked up, so how would we transport them?? Sad to think about, but there you have it.

Good luck on making your own kits!

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I think Adelle has a very good kit....Some other foods are some gluten-free freeze- dried goods. Like the ice cream for snacking ( freeze-dried of couse) Costco's & Sam's also carry cans of meats, turkey, chicken,roast beef & wild alaskan salmon that are long keepers. Another is dinty moore beef stew, which can be heated over an open fire by pouring into extra strength reynold's foil. Sardines -- full of protein.... Boomi Bars & lara bars., cold cereal eaten dry.Dry milk powder can be mixed with bottled water. Make your own gorp (nuts, dried fruit, choc) of couse you should eat from your stash often so it is always as fresh as possible.

Some MRE's are gluten-free too.Ener'g bread has a long shelf life & if you were hungary this would work heated over an open fire...

Don't forget a camping plate & cup. And some water filteration if by chance 72 hours turn into 2 weeks. You can ration solid food but we all need to have available plenty of water.A medical kit is also needed........

a shovel for digging a potty hole so it can be covered over if you must head for the hills to survive.2-way radios also can in handy...

The very first thing is to have a family plan on where to go to meet up so no one is left behind..I think that is the MOST IMPORTANT.

mamaw

mamaw

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