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Tephie

Favorite Pasta Brands?

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tinkyada, excellent stuff i have a few bags on hand so i dont go hungry....

i wanna get some of this biaglut and nottapasta now though....

how about pancakes though?

honestly, i found this stuff down VA and it is primo. its called maple grove farms. wasnt even expensive, like $3 a box. i recommend that you have blueberries on hand as it only complements it more.... i like cooking. i think im gonna test this stuff out to make some pastry type breads, some kind of grilled stickies, adjusted w/ a few extra ingredients.

$0.02,

jdog

p.s.: someone get me a board administrator so i can get my pic up, please...

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I bought Tinkyada when I was first diagnosed and was pretty pleased. Then I met someone through a support group meeting that highly recommended Biaglut pasta. She comes from a huge Italian family where pasta is a staple. She swore by the Biaglut brand. It's almost $8 a bag, but it's well worth it. I usually mix the Biaglut and the Tinkyada together. If I'm cooking for someone else too, then I use strictly Biaglut. You really cannot tell the difference, it tastes like regular (gluten) pasta.

Do you use the milk-free egg-free Biaglut?? Their website lists "pasta" and also "milk free, egg free products" The pasta is listed as wheat, milk, and egg free anyway, so I was wondering if they actually have two different types or if they just listed it that way to call attention!! Thanks!

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I was in Whole Foods this weekend and as I was picking up my usual gluten-free noodles, another pkg caught my eye. Not sure if they're new or not, but the big "Award Winning Taste" made me pick up a box. They are 100% soybean, there is golden, green and black varieties (don't remember the brand). Has anyone tried them? I was going to make them yesterday but changed my mind. They have 11g fiber and 23g protein!!! I just have to get up the courage to taste them...

-Rachelle

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Do you use the milk-free egg-free Biaglut?? Their website lists "pasta" and also "milk free, egg free products" The pasta is listed as wheat, milk, and egg free anyway, so I was wondering if they actually have two different types or if they just listed it that way to call attention!! Thanks!

There aren't two kinds at the store, just the one. I just checked my bag though and it say's right on the front without milk or eggs (it's in Italian) and I checked the ingredients and there are none. So, yes, I use the milk free, egg free (gluten free) Biaglut. I definitey recommend it if you can get it.

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I don't know how easy it is to find but my local health food store stocks a pasta called Bionaturae it's from Italy too and to me it's the most like the "real" thing you can get when it comes to spaghetti noodles.

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My favorite is Trader Joe's brand of Brown rice pasta. It is also the cheapest one I have found. My mom uses it to make pasta salad and no one can tell the difference. People always rave about the pasta salad. And if you want to reheat gluten free pasta, don't put any sauce on it when you put it in the fridge. Just reheat it in the microwave with a tiny bit of water or in a pan with a tiny bit of water. then add sauce.

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When I feel like dealing with Trader Joes on a weekend (ours is always packed) I prefer their rice pasta. But we usually use Tinkyada pasta. I have noticed the slimy thing but I think that is when I don't use enough water but if you rinse it with cool water like it says to, it is ok. Also, I always take 2 minutes off of the time and the texture comes out perfect, so instead of doing 15 minutes, I only do 13. I just recently found it being sold at a Shop Rite nearby. Otherwise, I get it at our local health food stores or whole foods.

Before going gluten free I frequently made baked ziti for family functions. Even with the wheat pasta you need to cut your cooking time if you're going to bake it in the oven. It cooks more while in the oven.

Nicole

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I don't know how easy it is to find but my local health food store stocks a pasta called Bionaturae it's from Italy too and to me it's the most like the "real" thing you can get when it comes to spaghetti noodles.

I haven't found the BiAglut yet but I found the bionaturae in spaghetti form today at QFC and bought a package. I have tried Tinkyada rotelli and it was ok but not wonderful. I also bought Tinkyada lasagne noodles but haven't tried them yet.

Has anyone tried the Quinoa noodles? I also bought them. (Pasta was my favorite food, tied with Pizza, pre-diagnosis).

I'm going to make a batch of my famous clam spaghetti with the bionaturae. I haven't made it since February 2nd.

~Laura

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I haven't found the BiAglut yet but I found the bionaturae in spaghetti form today at QFC and bought a package. I have tried Tinkyada rotelli and it was ok but not wonderful. I also bought Tinkyada lasagne noodles but haven't tried them yet.

Has anyone tried the Quinoa noodles? I also bought them. (Pasta was my favorite food, tied with Pizza, pre-diagnosis).

I'm going to make a batch of my famous clam spaghetti with the bionaturae. I haven't made it since February 2nd.

~Laura

I actually like the Ancient Harvest Quinoa pasta but I don't use it in a dish for anyone else because it doesn't taste like regular, standard pasta. It has it's own flavor and a lot of the people I share food with are not as adventurous. The quinoa pasta is my favorite for an Italian stir-fry (cook chicken chunks, red pepper, onion and Roma tomatos in EV olive oil, add a dollop of pesto after it's done and stir into prepared pasta). Not everyone likes the quinoa pasta but everyone likes the Tinkyada.

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I thought Tinkyada was the best until I tried Cornitos from Gluten Free Trading Company. We got some noodles and they seem to taste like egg noodles except no egg and gluten-free! Really good. Lighter in texture than rice pasta. I'll still eat Tinkyada, but this other brand is really good.

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I agree that Tinkyada is excellent, but I usually use DeBoles. I'm Italian so giving up "regular" pasta was hard...I think how you cook it helps. My grandmother told me to always make it "al dente" (slightly firm), rinse with hot water and give it a good blast with cold water at the end. If you add a little extra light olive oil to the water it helps the noodles retain their shape.

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My fave is DeBoles. http://www.deboles.com/products/index.php. I know you can get it in Stop and Shop and Whole Foods. Even my husband likes it and he doesn't need to be gluten free. Definitely better in taste and texture than Tinkyada. And they have so many different varities - even a no boil lasgana noodle. I use the rice ones not the corn.

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Wow, such a diversity of opinion. I'm one that isn't that big a fan of Tinkyada. But I often use it because it is readily available. I've tried BiAglut & Schar's (too lazy to check spelling :rolleyes: ) and they are pretty good. But they seem to be a mail order thing for me. Depending on the recipe, I've used corn pasta and quinoa pasta and they have worked.

My favorite is Glutino. Naturally I haven't found it in local stores. I just asked a store to carry it (and 100% buckwheat soba noodles). I'll keep my fingers crossed. Even if they don't do it, they have my gratitude. I found for the first time that they now stock three kinds of gluten-free beer. YEAH!

OK, back on topic ... When I first went gluten-free and before I knew I was supposed to avoid soy also, I tried Bionaturae. I thought this was the very best stuff and this I can find more easily. I'm thinking I might try and see if I can handle a little soy now. I really want this pasta :rolleyes:

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Tinkyada is by far the best pasta I've tried, made pasta and tuna tonight and once again my son didn't leave any left overs. Their lasagna noodles are fantastic......I guess you would say I think they are good. :P

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My favorite gluten-free pasta that I have tried is Pastariso, I think they are out of Canada. My local health food stores are no longer carrying the brand so I now use Tinkyada.

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I am another that is not too fond of Tinkyada.

After three tries of cooking it, I found that it is either mushy and slimy, or too firm in the middle. I couldn't get it to a nice "al dente" texture.

My favorite by far (so far) is Mrs. Leepers. I have served it to friends that did not know that I am gluten free and they couldn't tell the difference. They were very surprised when I told them the pasta was gluten free. I have used Mrs. Leeper's pastas in casseroles, spaghetti pies, pasta salads, and other pasta dishes with no problem. As long as I don't over cook the pasta, I have had no problems re-heating it either.

My gluten loving fiance even prefers Mrs. Leepers pasta over regular gluten pasta and will often take it to work to re-heat the next day. After the third time making Tinkyada's, he begged me to find another pasta!

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I use Mrs Leepers alphabet pasta for soups and it is nice. I also use Glutano Noodles for Soup, yum! They are called Targalet or something. I am not sure of the name at the moment.

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My vote goes to BiAglut but it hasn't been available until recently again. They had to redo their labeling to permit it into the U.S. In the next month we all should see it again. They do not have all the shapes such as jumbo shells so I use Tinkyada for that but BiAglut all the way for us. That is if you want the taste of the real deal stuff.....

I think Dietary specialities now has it in stock.

mamaw

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I use Mrs Leepers alphabet pasta for soups and it is nice.

I also use these in soup! They really hold their shape.

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Oddly enough...my favorite noodles are white rice noodles by Ener-G. I actually dislike most of what Ener-G sells. I guess I like these noodles simply because you can't taste them when you poor the sauce over them. Sounds like strange logic, but I got tired of purchasing other noodles only to find that they changed the taste of my spaghetti.

I do, however, enjoy Mrs. Leepers in some of my dinners.

Just my thought. -Julie :)

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my favorite pasta brand is tinkyada, it's absolutely wonderful and my husband and kids love it too.

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I too will add another vote for Tinkyada (brown rice) noodles. I have also searched for less expensive alternatives and found that cornstarch noodles work better than plain white rice noodles (found in most Asian markets but on more and more grocery shelves in the Oriental section). Seems the cornstarch noodles take on the flavors better whereas plain rice noodles are more bland. I am using them mostly for spaghetti. ;)

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I too will add another vote for Tinkyada (brown rice) noodles. I have also searched for less expensive alternatives and found that cornstarch noodles work better than plain white rice noodles (found in most Asian markets but on more and more grocery shelves in the Oriental section). Seems the cornstarch noodles take on the flavors better whereas plain rice noodles are more bland. I am using them mostly for spaghetti. ;)

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