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Susan_in_NC

Chebe Bread

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I feel like saying "you all don't know how helpful this forum has been" but, then reading through posts, I think you have all been where I am now at one point or another.

First off, THANKS!

Second, read a lot about this bread. Is it a recipe or brand? Where do I find it? Have looked at EarthFare, Whole Foods, WalMart, Kroger and Harris Teeter. (Interesting which brands each seperate store carries). EarthFare and Harris Teeter carry some Glutino brands but so far have not come across the pretzels, may have to request they stock them!

Have a few of Bob's mixes, will be trying this week -- find them everywhere. Namanste brownie mix was at EarthFare, and will make those tomorrow to take on vacation with me.

Which leads to my other question. I'm going to an area that seems to have limited options for gluten free meals, including the whitewater rafting trip. So, I will pack my own food for that and ask the guides to keep it in the dry sack but wrapped seperately from other foods (I'll prepackage to insure this). Any suggestions for what would travel best? I'm thinking fruit and cheese right now and a few brownines. Simple and easy to find. In the past, when rafting I was never starving when we stopped for lunch, more likely I'll want a heavy snack at the end of the trip and that I can have waiting in my personal cooler. Still, suggestions will be welcome. BUT, still haven't learned to be a fan of rice cakes. The term cardboard comes to mind!

Thanks,

Susan

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Chebe is one product I'd buy and make even if I were cured of Celiac tomorrow. It's a good travel bread because it doesn't have to be heated to taste good, will stay good off refrigeration for at least 2-3 days (I've gone 4 but they are slightly stale) and it can handle some bouncing around without crumbling. I buy the original Chebe mix (red package) from a local store, mainly to support the store. They have a dairy free mix also.

But you can buy it online from the company here: http://www.chebe.com/order.htm

My favorite standard is to prepare a red package of original mix with a 5 or 6 oz of parmesan (instead of the 4 oz called for on the package) and using the baking powder suggested. We use Benecol instead of butter and since we don't usually measure it, probably use closer to 3 tbsp than the 2 tbsp called for in the package. This produces a cheesy, chewy deli roll that is very similar to Schlotsky's bread (green chilis are good in it too). You can vary the results dramatically depending on what you add. I've made powdered sugar donuts, mock-rye bread rolls and breakfast pastries Ask if you want my recipes and check the recipes tab on their website.

PREP TIPS: Always measure the water carefully. Chebe dough, when you get the water content right, isn't that sticky and doesn't leave any dry mix in the bowl (I use my KitchenAid mixer). When you get too much water, it becomes very sticky and hard to handle but it still bakes up good. When mixed and in the form of one big dough ball, I spray the inside of a quart ziplock with butter flavored PAM and put the dough ball in the ziploc to pat it out to a consistent thickness (about 3/4 inch). Then, I cut the bag off on three sides (leaving a plastic work area) and use my pizza cutter to cut the dough into 16-20 squares. Roll each square into a ball and bake on parchment paper.

The biggest problem people seem to have with Chebe is they apply what they are told for other gluten-free bread and put it in an airtight container immediately after baking. If you do that with Chebe it goes gummy. After it comes out of the oven, wrap it in a cotton tea towel and leave it sitting in a basket or colander for 12-24 hours to breathe.

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Karen,

Thank you for the explaination and the very helpful directions. I'll certainly do the recipe search and use the link you included. At least now I know what to be looking for, even to the color of the box!

Susan

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----snip----

Which leads to my other question. I'm going to an area that seems to have limited options for gluten free meals, including the whitewater rafting trip. So, I will pack my own food for that and ask the guides to keep it in the dry sack but wrapped seperately from other foods (I'll prepackage to insure this). Any suggestions for what would travel best? I'm thinking fruit and cheese right now and a few brownines. Simple and easy to find. In the past, when rafting I was never starving when we stopped for lunch, more likely I'll want a heavy snack at the end of the trip and that I can have waiting in my personal cooler. Still, suggestions will be welcome. BUT, still haven't learned to be a fan of rice cakes. The term cardboard comes to mind!

Thanks,

Susan

I'd also take Lara bars and JIF PB to go paks. Nut Thins go great with peanut butter but they are kind of fragile for travel. Apples slices and PB are a great combo. Mi-Del ginger snaps are good with PB too. Make sure your food stash is tied in well --if the group food falls out and floats downriver, there are probably alternates for everyone else.

For around the campfire that night, I'd take a can of Hormel chili with beans or Dinty Moore stew and maybe corn tortillas or Fritos Scoops (but don't forget a can opener). If you want something lighter, maybe a Thai Kitchen noodle cart or soup bowl meal?

BTW, I still hate rice cakes. They taste like you're eating a styrofoam cooler. The thinner chip size ones are okay but I don't buy them.

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Hi Susan!

This all sounds very familiar. I went on a rafting trip the week of the 4th and here's what I brought for my lunch that day:

Dried Mango Slices (from Trader' Joe's)

Cinnamon Almonds (from Trader Joe's)

Chicken Sandwich w/mustard (made from Pamela's Bread Mix)

Choco Loco Bar (from Enjoy Life)

They all traveled well in a large Ziploc bag, and the rafting company was very accomodating. It was a chilly day and I needed the calories, so I'm glad I brought a large amount of food.

Have fun!!!

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