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georgie

Are Masseur Oils gluten-free Safe ?

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I had an appt this week for a chiropractor and masseur. Oil was used and now - 3 days later - I feel ill as though I have been glutened. I was struggling to find a reason and then thought of this oil that was used. Could that be the cause ??

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I had an appt this week for a chiropractor and masseur. Oil was used and now - 3 days later - I feel ill as though I have been glutened. I was struggling to find a reason and then thought of this oil that was used. Could that be the cause ??

Hi Georgie,

I am a licensed massage therapist (masseuse) in the United States. To my knowledge, the lotions, creams, oils used in professional massage therapy do not contain gluten. However, those with nut allergies must be aware that some of the creams, etc. do contain various nut oils. I am not familiar with what is commonly used in Australia.

I doubt you were "glutened" in that sense; the sense that new gluten was introduced to your system. What is important to be aware of is that massage stimulates the lymphatic system, which is part of your immune defense, as well as stimulating the general blood circulation. It also initiates toxins out of your muscles and possibly your organs through the general cleansing nature of the body when things get stirred up, as in during a massage. It is quite likely that your feeling of being "glutened" is due to the upsurge of old, stagnant toxins that had been lodged in your system. Furthermore, it is not an unusual event for someone, with a food intolerance/allergy or not, to feel ill after a massage or chiro treatment. This happens sometimes and is part of the reason behind the suggestion to drink plenty of water after being massaged. I have personally known some people to experience diarrhea and flu-like symptoms after a massage. This is merely due to the toxin-removal nature of every form of massage therapy, no matter how mild the massage may have seemed (if, in fact, it was light). In fact, a form of massage known as lymphatic drainage uses a very, very light degree of pressure to activate the lymphatic system. Personally, I have had this type of massage performed on me and, while receiving it, thought it was probably doing very little, due to the light pressure, but I was so sick I could not work that evening! A kind of cleansing/healing had been initiated!

And, this is important, I suggest you contact the practitioners who worked with you with your concerns, as they will be able to more succintly advise you. They will know what products they have used (to know the true answer regarding product info) and, will probably confirm some of the natural reactions to massage I have mentioned. Feeling unwell after a massage can be a 'normal' reaction. It certainly does not mean it will always happen. Like everything else, it depends on many factors, like the condition of the client at the time of the massage, etc.

I hope I have eased your mind and I hope you are feeling well.

Again, contact your masseuse! Yours is a totally reasonable question to ask him.

Take care,

Heidi

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Georgie,

I questioned this as well. After a massage I had a full on gluten reaction. I went so far as to write the company from which my massage practitioner buys her oils, but I never got a response. I've gotten massages from her many times and only once did I have that reaction and she always uses the same oil.

Her explanation was that maybe the massage released some trapped toxins. I wonder if she had gluten on her hands and accidentally worked it into my body. I guess there's no way of knowing for sure. But I'm not going to dwell on it.

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Im also a Licensed Massage Therapist in Florida for 5 years. I was using Biotone NutriNaturals lotion for my sessions. I never even bothered to look at the ingredients until I was diagnosed a few months ago. Sure enough it contains wheat germ oil. Obviously I stopped using it immediately.

My wife retails skin care products and tells me that wheat is a common ingredient used. It is high in vitamins and has antiaging properties, so its great for non-celiacs.

I know you need to ingest gluten to get a reaction. But some of these oils are so sticky, they seem to stay on my hands after several washes. Then I touch my food, or my face, etc... I think its best to avoid skin/body care products for this reason. Always ask your therapist what they are using or take your own lotion with you to a session.

And yes its true that massage stimulates many systems in the body. It can release toxins to be eliminated and therefore sometimes people feel sore or 'down' afterwards. We were taught to encourage clients to drink plenty of fluid before/after a massage to help with this effect. Overall it depends on the person how the body will react, but ultimately massage has many positive effects for the body and mind.

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Im also a Licensed Massage Therapist in Florida for 5 years. I was using Biotone NutriNaturals lotion for my sessions. I never even bothered to look at the ingredients until I was diagnosed a few months ago. Sure enough it contains wheat germ oil. Obviously I stopped using it immediately.

My wife retails skin care products and tells me that wheat is a common ingredient used. It is high in vitamins and has antiaging properties, so its great for non-celiacs.

I know you need to ingest gluten to get a reaction. But some of these oils are so sticky, they seem to stay on my hands after several washes. Then I touch my food, or my face, etc... I think its best to avoid skin/body care products for this reason. Always ask your therapist what they are using or take your own lotion with you to a session.

And yes its true that massage stimulates many systems in the body. It can release toxins to be eliminated and therefore sometimes people feel sore or 'down' afterwards. We were taught to encourage clients to drink plenty of fluid before/after a massage to help with this effect. Overall it depends on the person how the body will react, but ultimately massage has many positive effects for the body and mind.

Wow! Wheat germ oil! Thanks for finding this. At my spa we use Amber products. Do you know if they are gluten-free? I wrote to the company but have had no response yet. I think Jojoba oil is a good rec. for anyone concerned; it is thought to be the least allergenic.

Take care,

Heidi

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Wow! Wheat germ oil! Thanks for finding this. At my spa we use Amber products. Do you know if they are gluten-free? I wrote to the company but have had no response yet. I think Jojoba oil is a good rec. for anyone concerned; it is thought to be the least allergenic.

Take care,

Heidi

I think Amber products are ok. Im sure they confirmed them. Amber usually lists the all the ingredients on their product container in any case. I also agree that using strait oils is also a good way to avoid allergens for clients. Both Amber, Biotone and several other companies sell unscented hypoallergenic lotion/oil/cream bases to be customized with essential oils to create a signature line for clients.

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