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imsohungry

Answers For Celiac Baking Newbies

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I had an idea. There are so many different threads to answer basic questions for someone baking who is new to the celiac/gluten free diet. The answers are all over the place. Let's start a thread where we can provide information we know. This isn't really a question/answer thread (ask if you need to though) and feel free to correct any incorrect information provided. I'll start....

1. Tapioca starch is the same as Tapioca flour

2. Potato starch is Not the same as Potato flour

3. xanthan gum can be used interchangeably with guar gum

Anyone else?

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Sweet rice flour is NOT rice flour with sugar added. (I was actually told that at a Wild Oats).

It is also called glutinous rice flour but that means sticky and not a bad gluten for Celiacs.

I have only found it asian markets.

Shop asian markets for some of your flours and starches - they are much cheaper - I paid 69 cents/pound for my rice flours there.

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Thanks for these tips...I am bumping this up again.

Jody

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I would add that Gluten-free doughs frequently look nothing like the gluten doughs you are used to, don't give in to the temptation to add something to make it 'look right'. Trust the people who gave you the recipe!

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Don't try to just substitute rice flour for wheat flour, and call it good (it won't be.) For gluten-free baked goods, you need to use a blend of gluten-free flours, such as:

1 1/2 c. sorghum flour

1 1/2 c. potato starch or cornstarch

1 c. tapioca flour

(Carol Fenster's Flour Blend)

There are premixed blends available for purchase, or you can mix up your own.

-Sarah

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Bumpity, bump, bump ;)

1. When a gluten free recipe calls for unflavored gelatin, you can find the product on the baking aisle near the Jello products.

It is very inexpensive, and I believe the Knox brand is gluten-free (someone correct me if I'm wrong).

Currently, I use the store-brand because I verified it was gluten-free.

2. It is very important not to "pack down" gluten-free flours in the measuring cups. These flours are naturally "thicker" and "heavier" than wheat flour.

-Julie :)

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Thank you!! After 2 years, I have finally healed enough to tolerate rice and corn and I have started making goodies. Mostly disastorous results, but eventually it will get better and with these tips, the learning curve will flatten out.

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Sweet rice flour is NOT rice flour with sugar added. (I was actually told that at a Wild Oats).

It is also called glutinous rice flour but that means sticky and not a bad gluten for Celiacs.

I have found that "Glutinous Rice Flour" and "Sweet Rice Flour" are different. The sweet rice flour is great for thickening gravies and sauces, but the glutinous flour becomes thick and yucky. It's usually used for making special Asian dishes that kind of resemble noodles.

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I was told by a person who works in a gluten free bakery to NOT overmix any homemade batters/bread mixes. She said to let the moisture absorb into the flours slowly and not to try and do it quickly like traditional baking.

I have not attempted any baking yet, but wonder if anyone has found this to be true?

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I was told by a person who works in a gluten free bakery to NOT overmix any homemade batters/bread mixes. She said to let the moisture absorb into the flours slowly and not to try and do it quickly like traditional baking.

I have not attempted any baking yet, but wonder if anyone has found this to be true?

Yes, it's true. If you over mix something it ruins the texture and makes baked goods kind of rubbery.

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I have found that "Glutinous Rice Flour" and "Sweet Rice Flour" are different. The sweet rice flour is great for thickening gravies and sauces, but the glutinous flour becomes thick and yucky. It's usually used for making special Asian dishes that kind of resemble noodles.

Ahhhh . . . that might explain what happened to my pancakes this morning :lol: . They tasted great but the batter was really gooey and they were not wanting to cook all the way through. That tip that I posted (which is apparently wrong), I found on the internet after an employee at wild oats told me to add sugar to my rice flour to make it sweet rice flour . . .yea, right <_< .

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I have had fabulous results over the past couple of months since we started and here's what I learned.

Annalise Roberts is AWESOME. You do need to use the expensive brown rice flour for the best results, but they're really worth it. I served a cake to a group of non celiacs last night and it was the best cake they'd ever eaten. Plus you only have to have 3 types of flour on hand (ie, 1 flour mix) to make all the sweets in her book.

Most gluten-free recipes don't say to sift, but I sift the dry ingredients together in a dedicated sifter. This rids the dry ingredients of any lumps they may be harboring.

If you can, invest in a heavy duty stand mixer. The batters are so thick and heavy, the lighter mixers have a hard time mixing them properly. They kind of climb up the beaters.

Always, ALWAYS use parchment paper for cakes and cookies. It makes a big difference in the texture and quality of the finished product.

If you chill cookie dough thoroughly before you cook it, you can use butter instead of shortening. (I hate the taste of anything made with shortening, so I wanted to reinvent the tollhouse type cookies with butter).

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Don't overlook old baking spices, powders etc. as potentially contaminated if you used to dip measuring spoons into multiple ingredients without washing them in between.

Yeah, especially if you're like me and have a habit of stirring with whatever's in your hand. (Bad habit....)

Also, I've found that gluten-free baking does not agree with non-stick pans. Even when I grease them to death, or if I don't grease them at all. My stuff always comes out of the pan much better if it's glass or that white pan I have (ceramic?)

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Sweet rice flour is NOT rice flour with sugar added. (I was actually told that at a Wild Oats).

It is also called glutinous rice flour but that means sticky and not a bad gluten for Celiacs.

I have only found it asian markets.

Shop asian markets for some of your flours and starches - they are much cheaper - I paid 69 cents/pound for my rice flours there.

That's true. These markets also have gram flour, which is chickpea flour.

The rice flour usually comes in fine and coarse. I use a little rice flour instead of cornstarch to thicken a stew gravy, sometimes.

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Great topic!

I've found that the flours all have their own flavors and cannot be interchanged without affecting the taste of the baked good. Sorgum flour tastes nutty to me. Ruined my chocolate chip cookies :(

I've also learned that most gluten-free recipes need to sit for a few minutes after mixing (don't over mix). Somehow sitting helps the lumps get absorbed...I think...

I have a very hard time following recipes exactly. I have learned the hard way to follow a recipe exactly the first time I make it, just so I know what to expect. Then the next time I make it, I vary the recipe to some degree.

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