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hathor

Buffalo Milk Mozzarella

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I know I can handle goat's & sheep milk cheese (at least small quantities of them ... a little fortunately goes a long way). I've seen other casein-intolerants say the same thing. (Naturally, reactions are individual.) I haven't seen anyone mention buffalo milk cheese, though.

Anyone have any experience with this or have read something on the subject? Maybe someone else has been a guinea pig on this. I would hate to set myself up for anything like what I go through with casein :(

I only tried these other cheeses after six months of healing BTW I think you would want to avoid them during healing; if you have a leaky gut you might create antibodies to these proteins too.

I'm not being a pure little vegan I know. But I only followed the diet because of how it made me feel, not for ideological reasons. For instance, I eat honey and occasionally have animal foods. Just throwing this in here to preclude anyone saying, "Uh, you say you don't eat animal products ... what do you think cheese is made from." :lol: It is just that I can't have soy cheese anymore and I'm told that the casein-free rice cheese tastes like wax. I can't have "uncheese" concoctions made with nutritional yeast, either.

OK, I'll stop whining. I just thought it might be nice to occasionally have a little real mozzarella. I remember going to Italy some years ago & a waiter telling me I could eat the stuff -- "This isn't cheese; it is fresh mozzarella."


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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I know I can handle goat's & sheep milk cheese (at least small quantities of them ... a little fortunately goes a long way). I've seen other casein-intolerants say the same thing. (Naturally, reactions are individual.) I haven't seen anyone mention buffalo milk cheese, though.

Anyone have any experience with this or have read something on the subject? Maybe someone else has been a guinea pig on this. I would hate to set myself up for anything like what I go through with casein :(

I only tried these other cheeses after six months of healing BTW I think you would want to avoid them during healing; if you have a leaky gut you might create antibodies to these proteins too.

I'm not being a pure little vegan I know. But I only followed the diet because of how it made me feel, not for ideological reasons. For instance, I eat honey and occasionally have animal foods. Just throwing this in here to preclude anyone saying, "Uh, you say you don't eat animal products ... what do you think cheese is made from." :lol: It is just that I can't have soy cheese anymore and I'm told that the casein-free rice cheese tastes like wax. I can't have "uncheese" concoctions made with nutritional yeast, either.

OK, I'll stop whining. I just thought it might be nice to occasionally have a little real mozzarella. I remember going to Italy some years ago & a waiter telling me I could eat the stuff -- "This isn't cheese; it is fresh mozzarella."

Hathor

I have tried the buffalo yogurt and Mozzerella. I had a little difficulty with them. I also have a cholesterol problem and in some of the yogurt there are 6 grams of saturated fat because they use the whole milk. I may try it again. I did like the Mozzerella. :)

I have tried goat yogurt and that seems to be ok. I cannot touch dairy at all.

Susan


Dairy/Cesain free Oct. 2005

Gluten free June 2006

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Buffalo milk and cow milk are very similar.

Goat milk has simpler proteins and are often tolerated better among people with dairy issues.

Cow's milk provides 67kcl and buffalo milk provides 117kcl of energy per 100 ml. The protein content of cows and buffalo milk is about 3.2gm and 4.25gm per 100ml respectively. The milk proteins mainly consist of casein (about 80%) and whey (about 20 %).

Also, remember that since each mammal has protein and sugar variants in their milk, it's possible to be allergic to the milk of only one, or one set of, mammals.

Unlike cow's milk, goat's milk does not contain agglutinin. As a result,

the fat globules in goat's milk do not cluster together, making them

easier to digest. Like cow's milk, goat's milk is low in essential fatty

acids, because goats also have EFA-destroying bacteria in their ruminant

stomachs. Yet, goat milk is reported to contain more of the essential

fatty acids linoleic and arachnodonic acids, in addition to a higher

proportion of short-chain and medium-chain fatty acids. These are easier

for intestinal enzymes to digest. Different protein. Goat milk protein

forms a softer curd (the term given to the protein clumps that are formed

by the action of your stomach acid on the protein), which makes the

protein more easily and rapidly digestible.

So.. the upshot is, all milk has lots of casein in it.. otherwise it

wouldn't BE milk... but there are different types of casein and for

someone who has a casein sensitivity, goat milk may provide an alternative

to which they don't react.

http://www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info/kn...sensitivity.htm

Sandy


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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Thanks everyone. Maybe I will try a little bit of buffalo mozzarella next time I see it ... if I have the time to deal with any adverse reaction. But I probably shouldn't go out of my way to find the stuff.

Nice thing about goat's cheese is that a little goes a long way in flavoring things. A couple times I've made gluten-free pasta, with some asparagus & garlic sauteed in a bit of olive oil ... sprinkle on a little bit of goat cheese crumbles ... heavenly.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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