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saaa-wheat<3

The Ever Controversial Mcdonald's French Fry Thread

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Okay, so I go to their website to see if they have any info on their iced coffees (too vague to trust) and discovered this:

French Fries:

Potatoes, vegetable oil (partially hydrogenated soybean oil, natural beef flavor (wheat and milk derivatives)*, citric acid (preservative), dextrose, sodium acid pyrophosphate (maintain color), dimethylpolysiloxane (antifoaming agent)), salt. Prepared in vegetable oil ((may contain one of the following: Canola oil, corn oil, soybean oil, hydrogenated soybean oil, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, partially hydrogenated corn oil with TBHQ and citric acid added to preserve freshness), dimethylpolysiloxane added as an antifoaming agent). *CONTAINS: WHEAT AND MILK (Natural beef flavor contains hydrolyzed wheat and hydrolyzed milk as starting ingredients.)

It says that this list is updated as of todays date.

Now, I have seen threads saying that they are or are not, as well as their website postings indicating that they don't contain gluten, or rather, that they just omit from saying that there is.

Is the beef flavoring something new or did some sort of testing results come in that I don't know about?

I am devastated!!!

I know, I know, I can make my own, eat Cascadian or Ore Ida (but not the Crispy Crowns, which happen to by my favorite, however, Shaw's/Albertson's brand is gluten-free and they are better) But there's nothin' like satisfying a craving real quick on a lunch hour for real cheap money.... :rolleyes:

The thing is, I've never had a reaction to McD's FF. :unsure:

I am so curious to hear from those of you out there that have eaten McD's FF without incident lately...or, if someone can clue me in on what's been going on that I haven't heard about.

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Guest Doll

I eat McD's fries all of the time with no problem. And I am VERY sensitive to CC. I'm also in Canada. The US I believe uses different ingredients in their fries.

BUT "Hydrolyzed" Wheat means that the wheat proteins have been broken up into smaller chains or even individual amino acids in some cases, rendering in them harmless to Celiacs. Meaning that wheat startch or hydrolyzed wheat does not contain the sequences harmful to Celiacs, and would not cause a reaction in them. Basically, the structure has been broken down into something harmless as it is no longer wheat. If it is broken down into amino acids, these are simply structures ("bulding blocks") of life that the body builds up and breaks down in different combos all day long while maintaining itself.

Countires outside of North America consider wheat startch to be okay for Celiacs in general. North America says no, probably because of the idea that some hydrolysis (breaking down) may not be complete in all cases.

That said, from what I know, McD's HAS tested their fries, and they are fully hydrolyzed enough to be considered gluten free.

Hope this helps!

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The beef flavoring is nothing new. Actually that was found out about before the milk and wheat stuff. Vegetarians were outraged when they found out about the beef. I won't eat there ever again. Daughter and I have too many food allergies to trust them.

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I work at at wendys, and trust me, it's not just ingredients that people should worry about, but cross contamination, even if the product itself is seeming gluten free

For example, at my work, our fryer is split into three sections, with buttons that can change the cooking times from fries, nuggets, or etc. So many times, fries are cooked in the same oil that nuggets, or other chicken are.

I'm sure this is well known though.

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I have never had a reaction to McDonalds fries and I am relatively sensitive. I do, however, only eat them on rare occasion for fear of CC. My McD's has their french fry frier on the opposite side of the restaurant from the other fryers and they're very allergy aware. I'm lucky. I'm not sure I'd risk eating at any other McDonalds just because of CC risks.

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I allow my son to have the McDonald's french fries about once a month. I eat them about once a month also. Both of our antibodies are negative. We have never has a reaction to them. If we had a reaction or spike in our antibodies, I would not eat them anymore.

It is definitely a personal choice, and I understand why many people do not eat them. It was written about in Living Without last year, and they said that they were gluten-free. Here on Celiac.com the GIG said they are gluten-free. CC is aways a risk when we eat out, and we still have to do our due diligence when ordering (asking if there is there a dedicated fryer, etc).

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I eat them on occasion but it is not often. It is pretty much up to personal choice, some people will not eat them period, some will. It's a touchy subject since everyone is different.

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Guest j_mommy

I emailed them and this is their response.....

Thank you for contacting McDonald's with your questions concerning the recent reports about the presence of milk and wheat in our French fries and hash browns. First and foremost, please understand that we care about our customers and that is why McDonald's communicates nutrition information about its menu items on its website and in its restaurants. We also believe that those with a milk or wheat allergy should discuss this information with their health care provider.

As it specifically relates to our French fries and hash browns, based upon input from our suppliers, we have historically reported that our French fries and hash browns in the U.S. were allergen-free.

In conjunction with the new Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, our suppliers informed us for the first time that hydrolyzed milk and hydrolyzed wheat are ingredients in the natural flavoring used in the frying oil for the French fries and hash browns. Based on this new information, we updated nutrition disclosures on these products on our website. We want to take this opportunity to expand on the information we provided on our website, and to outline the steps we have taken to further clarify the situation. We sincerely regret any confusion that may have occurred.

This is what we can tell you. The frying oil used to prepare our French fries and hash browns contains a natural flavoring. One ingredient in the natural flavoring is hydrolyzed milk and another is hydrolyzed wheat. We have reached out to the scientific community for definitive answers concerning these starting ingredients.

As it relates to the hydrolyzed milk, initial testing was conducted on the French fries and hash browns using a Neogen Veratox test at a 2.5 parts per million level of sensitivity. The Neogen Veratox test found no detectable intact milk proteins. As it relates to the hydrolyzed wheat, initial testing was conducted on the French fries and hash browns using a RIDASCREEN Gliadin ELISA test at a 3 parts per million level of sensitivity. The RIDASCREEN Gliadin ELISA test found no detectable intact gluten proteins. Because partially broken down milk or wheat proteins may be present, and they also may be clinically significant for an individual with a milk or wheat allergy, these tests are not definitive.

Consequently, we decided that additional allergen testing be done on these ingredients using the Radioallergosorbent Inhibition Test (RAST). The RAST test found virtually no wheat-allergic residues in the hydrolyzed wheat ingredient. The RAST test found some milk-allergic residues in the hydrolyzed milk ingredient. It should also be noted that the hydrolyzed milk and hydrolyzed wheat ingredients are only a portion of the natural flavoring and that the natural flavoring itself represents a small amount of the frying oil.

That said, for people with a milk or wheat allergy, this new and important information should be discussed with a health care provider.

We appreciate the valuable perspectives we have received on this important topic. We hope that you find this information helpful and we thank you again for your patronage and the trust you have placed in McDonald's.

Sincerely,

Catherine E. Adams Ph.D, R.D.

Corporate Vice President Worldwide Quality Systems, Food Safety and Nutrition

McDonald's Corporation

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DS and I both eat McD's fries on occasion, him more than I. I am very sensitive and they have never made me sick. DS just had his 1 yr gluten-free blood work done and it was all negative.

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I actually went into a McDonald's for the first time in months a couple of weeks ago. It was in the morning and I was checking to see what I might eat for breakfast. I had taken a couple of gluten-free waffles in the car to have with a cup of coffee. When I got there I walked inside to see what info they had relating to gluten-free. I looked at the chart and nothing was said about ingredients in their meals. The manager was kind enough to get the actual packaging for the egg and hash browns. I saw the wheat/dairy listing on the potatoes. The egg product listing looked ok. I also found out that you can buy individual items like the scrambled eggs and sausage. I passed on the potatoes but got a single order of eggs and sausage. I'm pretty sure the person cooking the eggs did not clean the spatula or grill but decided to see what would happen so I ate both items. Nothing happened. Next time after reading some of the previous posts on this thread I will also get the hash browns. More and more I am really interested in the validity or sensitivity of the "ppm" in products. Also I am interested in the testing of things like hot oil and it's ability to retain or break down the effects of gluten. Like the medical profession I'm sure there is a lot to learn in the food/beverage industry about level of exposure and it's effect on different individuals.

I have eaten McDonald's fries a couple of times since being gluten-free and have had no obvious reaction.

Tom

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I think that everyone has to go with their own comfort level on this.

Either cc or the french fries made my dd very sick. So, we do not eat there.

Sometimes we will eat at Wendy's. She has not had a problem there.

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we, we went on holidays to british columbia and as you can imagine traveling with 4 little kids means lots of stops to mcd's playlands so i thought that i would give it a go and had a 1/4 pounder with no bun and ff's and i was fine, now im also very sensitive to soy, so the burgers are reall beef, much to my amazment. so i have a little faith now in mcd's i had a bad experience earlier this year in the city and i think it was cc their more than anything. so i now get to feel like a bit of a reall person again when we go to mcd's w/ the family.

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I don't react when I eat them, but I don't eat them a lot. I just wait until I get a craving.

I have never reacted to McD's fries, but i only eat them like once a month.

I only eat them when i get a craving, which happens for me to be once a month too :rolleyes: As long as i can have these and Reese's PB cups at these times, I'm all set :D

I emailed them and this is their response.....

Thank you for contacting McDonald's with your questions concerning the recent reports about the presence of milk and wheat in our French fries and hash browns. First and foremost, please understand that we care about our customers and that is why McDonald's communicates nutrition information about its menu items on its website and in its restaurants. We also believe that those with a milk or wheat allergy should discuss this information with their health care provider.

As it specifically relates to our French fries and hash browns, based upon input from our suppliers, we have historically reported that our French fries and hash browns in the U.S. were allergen-free.

In conjunction with the new Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, our suppliers informed us for the first time that hydrolyzed milk and hydrolyzed wheat are ingredients in the natural flavoring used in the frying oil for the French fries and hash browns. Based on this new information, we updated nutrition disclosures on these products on our website. We want to take this opportunity to expand on the information we provided on our website, and to outline the steps we have taken to further clarify the situation. We sincerely regret any confusion that may have occurred.

This is what we can tell you. The frying oil used to prepare our French fries and hash browns contains a natural flavoring. One ingredient in the natural flavoring is hydrolyzed milk and another is hydrolyzed wheat. We have reached out to the scientific community for definitive answers concerning these starting ingredients.

As it relates to the hydrolyzed milk, initial testing was conducted on the French fries and hash browns using a Neogen Veratox test at a 2.5 parts per million level of sensitivity. The Neogen Veratox test found no detectable intact milk proteins. As it relates to the hydrolyzed wheat, initial testing was conducted on the French fries and hash browns using a RIDASCREEN Gliadin ELISA test at a 3 parts per million level of sensitivity. The RIDASCREEN Gliadin ELISA test found no detectable intact gluten proteins. Because partially broken down milk or wheat proteins may be present, and they also may be clinically significant for an individual with a milk or wheat allergy, these tests are not definitive.

Consequently, we decided that additional allergen testing be done on these ingredients using the Radioallergosorbent Inhibition Test (RAST). The RAST test found virtually no wheat-allergic residues in the hydrolyzed wheat ingredient. The RAST test found some milk-allergic residues in the hydrolyzed milk ingredient. It should also be noted that the hydrolyzed milk and hydrolyzed wheat ingredients are only a portion of the natural flavoring and that the natural flavoring itself represents a small amount of the frying oil.

That said, for people with a milk or wheat allergy, this new and important information should be discussed with a health care provider.

We appreciate the valuable perspectives we have received on this important topic. We hope that you find this information helpful and we thank you again for your patronage and the trust you have placed in McDonald's.

Sincerely,

Catherine E. Adams Ph.D, R.D.

Corporate Vice President Worldwide Quality Systems, Food Safety and Nutrition

McDonald's Corporation

Thanks for getting the low down. I was so hoping it was the case of little ppm and not the fact that this was something new that they changed on us! Our local McD's don't fry near the nuggets and I have been lucky never to have been cc'd.

I actually went into a McDonald's for the first time in months a couple of weeks ago. It was in the morning and I was checking to see what I might eat for breakfast. I had taken a couple of gluten-free waffles in the car to have with a cup of coffee. When I got there I walked inside to see what info they had relating to gluten-free. I looked at the chart and nothing was said about ingredients in their meals. The manager was kind enough to get the actual packaging for the egg and hash browns. I saw the wheat/dairy listing on the potatoes. The egg product listing looked ok. I also found out that you can buy individual items like the scrambled eggs and sausage. I passed on the potatoes but got a single order of eggs and sausage. I'm pretty sure the person cooking the eggs did not clean the spatula or grill but decided to see what would happen so I ate both items. Nothing happened. Next time after reading some of the previous posts on this thread I will also get the hash browns. More and more I am really interested in the validity or sensitivity of the "ppm" in products. Also I am interested in the testing of things like hot oil and it's ability to retain or break down the effects of gluten. Like the medical profession I'm sure there is a lot to learn in the food/beverage industry about level of exposure and it's effect on different individuals.

I have eaten McDonald's fries a couple of times since being gluten-free and have had no obvious reaction.

Tom

Truth be told...i have also tried the egg and cheese part of the mcmuffin...using the hash browns as a "bun" :P

Thanks everyone, for your responses. I just love it here! :)

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