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DawnS

Fantastic Flavor - Bad Consistency

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I'm craving a tomato sandwich, so I finally decided to try to bake bread. The flavor was great, but it didn't rise right which made it really heavy and not very tall and a little gooey)

I used a combination of several different gluten free flours (quinoa, almond meal, amaranth, milllet, tapioca starch, chickpea) for a total of 3 cups. And 3 tsp of guar gum to replace the gluten.

The link I found somewhere on this message board said not to knead it, just to mix it together. And also not to let rise more than about 20 minutes. The original glutened recipe said to knead for 10 minutes and let rise until doubled. Then put in the pan and let rise some more. But I followed the gluten-free site's advice.

Another thing that may have affected is that I used agave nectar instead of white sugar. The yeast seemed to proof ok with it though.

So, any experts have an idea? Let it rise longer? use regular sugar? Mix it longer? Give up ;-)?

It tastes SO good after not having bread in months that I really want to try it again!

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sandwich breads are a little more difficult to reproduce than other gluten free bread products. did you use a regular wheat recipe and convert it, or did you use a gluten free bread recipe? i think you might have better luck making bread if you use a recipe that was specifically created for gluten free flours.

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Have you tried Lorka150's recipe? It's at recipezaar.com . Search for Gluten Free Flax Bread.

MY FAVORITE. Tastes like whole wheat to me. I make it with a mixture of brown rice and sorghum and then use all the other "flours" she recommends. Even my KIDS who aren't gluten free BEG for this bread! :D

I'm the only gluten-free one in my house, so after about 2 days, anything that's left gets turned into bread crumbs.

:)

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hm, not sure about the bread. i had a rough time when i first started cooking gluten-free, but then i made a friend on this forum, GFBetsy. She also lives by me, and we ended up meeting at the gluten-free support group here. She invited me over a few times, and helped me with a few recipes. since then, i've had less problems baking! i mostly attribute that to the recipes i use. go to her site, www.eatingglutenfree.com - not a bad recipe on there!

by the way, what is in a tomato sandwich?

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Most of the recipes that I have seen or tried said to let it rise to the top of the bread pan. Also, one of the problems with the gooey center is too much liquid in the recipe. Cut back on the water or milk. I'm definitely not an expert, but I have started making progress with the dense/gooey problem by cutting back a little on the fluid. It also helps with the sinking in problem while it's cooling. One of the other suggestions that I tried was when there is 10 minutes left, to reduce the heat by 25 degrees and cook for an additional 20 minutes.

Also, I'm using the gluten free flax bread recipe that kbabe suggested previously. It is by far the best that I have tried. My daughter will even eat it if it's not toasted.

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by the way, what is in a tomato sandwich?

It's really just two pieces of bread (I like mine toasted but some people like them soft), a BIG slice of tomato, a little salt and ideally some mayo. I'm also sensitive to eggs and soy so I haven't found a good mayo replacement. The last one I tried to make didn't thicken.

Here in NC people that raise their own tomatos get overrun and give them to anybody that will take them. I grew up on tomato sandwiches and somebody gave us 2 bags of tomatos on Sunday...yum yum!

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Daughter and I are allergic to eggs too. We find coconut oil is good on bread and toast. Not exactly the same as mayo but works for most things.

We've been buying falafel patties at our local Central Market. Nothing in them that we're allergic to. We also buy tomato slices and make sandwiches using the tomatoes on the outside and the falafel on the inside.

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Thanks to everybody for the tips...I'll keep trying.

It was a traditional recipe as a lot of gluten-free recipes that I've found call for rice/potato flours. I'm sensitive to potato and mildly sensitive to rice, so I try to keep my rice intake to yummy saffron rice or spanish rice w/black beans (well, and the occasional cookie!). I'll definitely check for the flax bread recipe 'cause I love whole wheat bread too. I'm the only one gluten free in my family too, but if I come up with something good, they'll help me eat it.

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We've been buying falafel patties at our local Central Market. Nothing in them that we're allergic to. We also buy tomato slices and make sandwiches using the tomatoes on the outside and the falafel on the inside.

Yum...that sounds good. I've made a big batch of homemade falafel (no garlic for me and most premade has that) and got bored with them before they were gone. Of course, I guess I could just make a smaller batch :D But that sounds like a great thing to do with it.

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dawn, my husband loves tomatoe sandwiches! have you seen bette hagman's book "the gluten free gourmet bakes bread"? it has a lot of recipes in it that allow for various intolerances. she gives directions for what to substitute for different allergies.

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Dawn - since you can't have rice or potato flour, you might be interested in this bread reciipe. Reminds you a lot of whole wheat, is light in texture and it is so yummy. (I have some cooling on the counter right now and can't wait until its cool enough to slice)

The name of it is Sesame Bean Bread, which I didn't think sounded that great; but when Betty Hagman said it was one of her favorites, I thought if she likes it then I have to try it. I've tried a ton of different recipes and always keep coming back to this one.

Dry Ingredients

3 1/4 Cups gluten-free Flour (equal parks of tapioca flour, corn starch and bean flour)

2 1/2 t Xanthan Gum

1 t Salt

1 t Gelatin

1 t Egg Replacer

3 T Sugar 2 T Sesame Seeds

1 T Yeast

Wet Ingredients

3 Eggs

1t Vinegar

1/4 cup melted butter

1 1/2 C water

Mix all dry ingredients in the bowl of stand mixer, add wet ingredients and beat for 3 minutes. Spoon into pan and let rise to top of pan. (I use fast rise yeast and put in 200 degree oven turned off to rise and it usualy takes about 35 minutes)

Bake in 350 degree oven about 50 minutes, covering with foil after first 10 minutes.

Try it, you'll like it.

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dawn, my husband loves tomatoe sandwiches! have you seen bette hagman's book "the gluten free gourmet bakes bread"? it has a lot of recipes in it that allow for various intolerances. she gives directions for what to substitute for different allergies.

I've heard of it, but not seen it. I've been frustrated with most of the books I've seen that are gluten-free because they don't take into account the other intolerances and end up being just as hard as traditional books. But if she give substitution directions...that's a different story. Thanks. I'll look through it at the book store or library.

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Dawn - since you can't have rice or potato flour, you might be interested in this bread reciipe. Reminds you a lot of whole wheat, is light in texture and it is so yummy. (I have some cooling on the counter right now and can't wait until its cool enough to slice)

The name of it is Sesame Bean Bread, which I didn't think sounded that great; but when Betty Hagman said it was one of her favorites, I thought if she likes it then I have to try it. I've tried a ton of different recipes and always keep coming back to this one.

Dry Ingredients

3 1/4 Cups gluten-free Flour (equal parks of tapioca flour, corn starch and bean flour)

2 1/2 t Xanthan Gum

1 t Salt

1 t Gelatin

1 t Egg Replacer

3 T Sugar 2 T Sesame Seeds

1 T Yeast

Wet Ingredients

3 Eggs

1t Vinegar

1/4 cup melted butter

1 1/2 C water

Mix all dry ingredients in the bowl of stand mixer, add wet ingredients and beat for 3 minutes. Spoon into pan and let rise to top of pan. (I use fast rise yeast and put in 200 degree oven turned off to rise and it usualy takes about 35 minutes)

Bake in 350 degree oven about 50 minutes, covering with foil after first 10 minutes.

Try it, you'll like it.

Sounds like it tastes pretty good :-) I'll have to check out the book for subs because there are still a few ingredients I don't use. Thanks for the suggestion (and for taking the time to type all that out!)

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I don't think that it's very easy to convert gluten breads to gluten free, unless maybe it's something like cornbread. I too use the gluten free flax bread on the recipezaar site. I could never get bread to turn out right until I got a bread machine. The bread would always not rise enough and then sink in on the sides. I had to send my son to daycare with 3 inch tall bread. :huh: One thing that I found was that I needed to add extra yeast. In the recipe I mentioned above calls for 2 tsp yeast, but I add 3 tsp. It also calls for 2 TBSP honey, but I use 3 TBSP sugar instead. I also substitute almond meal/flour for the flax, but that's just personal preference. Another thing is that if you use too many heavy flours your bread may have a hard time rising. I really like amaranth flour too, but you should maybe try mixing it with a bit of rice or sorghum flour to lighten it up a bit.

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I'm also sensitive to eggs and soy so I haven't found a good mayo replacement.

I avoid eggs and soy, also. AndreaB posted several yummy recipes for cheeses and mayo made with cashews. They are all good. I make the cashew mayo all the time - I could eat it with a spoon it's so good.

Dairy Free And Egg Free And Soy Free (except For A Couple), Cheese, mayonnaise, ranch dressing and butter

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I've just posted my yeast bread recipe. It makes small, 5" rounds that are like a pocket bread. No eggs, no soy, etc.

Yeast bread: Pocket Bread/flat bread or buns

I've about given up on loaf breads without egg. They just don't work well and are usually too wet and gummy on the inside. But these are great. You can use two rounds as sandwich bread, or open up the pockets and stuff. With they mayo recipe above, I've been able to have chicken salad sandwiches again (ahh, heavenly!). The pockets hold up well with wet ingredients, such as sloppy Joe filling.

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I avoid eggs and soy, also. AndreaB posted several yummy recipes for cheeses and mayo made with cashews. They are all good. I make the cashew mayo all the time - I could eat it with a spoon it's so good.

Dairy Free And Egg Free And Soy Free (except For A Couple), Cheese, mayonnaise, ranch dressing and butter

I saw those a while back, but alas...no cashews either! Do you think almonds would work? I did see a recipe somewhere the other day for an almond "cream cheese" that I think I'm going to try.

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I don't think that it's very easy to convert gluten breads to gluten free, unless maybe it's something like cornbread. I too use the gluten free flax bread on the recipezaar site. I could never get bread to turn out right until I got a bread machine. The bread would always not rise enough and then sink in on the sides. I had to send my son to daycare with 3 inch tall bread. :huh: One thing that I found was that I needed to add extra yeast. In the recipe I mentioned above calls for 2 tsp yeast, but I add 3 tsp. It also calls for 2 TBSP honey, but I use 3 TBSP sugar instead. I also substitute almond meal/flour for the flax, but that's just personal preference. Another thing is that if you use too many heavy flours your bread may have a hard time rising. I really like amaranth flour too, but you should maybe try mixing it with a bit of rice or sorghum flour to lighten it up a bit.

I was afraid to try the flax bread in the bread machine--does that work well with the almond meal, the 3 t yeast and the 3 T sugar? Do you do any other adjustments to that recipe?

Last time I tried a gluten-free recipe in the bread machine, it over-rose, and I never was able to get the burned smell out of the machine. :( So I've been baking everything in the oven now, but I would so love to get back to the bread machine!

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I don't think that it's very easy to convert gluten breads to gluten free, unless maybe it's something like cornbread. I too use the gluten free flax bread on the recipezaar site. I could never get bread to turn out right until I got a bread machine. The bread would always not rise enough and then sink in on the sides. I had to send my son to daycare with 3 inch tall bread. :huh: One thing that I found was that I needed to add extra yeast. In the recipe I mentioned above calls for 2 tsp yeast, but I add 3 tsp. It also calls for 2 TBSP honey, but I use 3 TBSP sugar instead. I also substitute almond meal/flour for the flax, but that's just personal preference. Another thing is that if you use too many heavy flours your bread may have a hard time rising. I really like amaranth flour too, but you should maybe try mixing it with a bit of rice or sorghum flour to lighten it up a bit.

I thought I'd replied to this already, but I don't see it...so if it shows up twice...sorry!

I will definitely try replacing the amaranth with sorghum and save the amaranth for flat bread. And the tip on the increase of yeast and sugar sounds fantastic.

I have a question about the bread machine though. I've decided I'm going to get one. I'm the only one in my household that's gluten free. I've seen that some people have mentioned a "dedicated" bread machine. But I share all other kitchen utensils and pots/pans. I just clean them really well before I use them if they've touched something I'm sensitive to. I haven't seemed to have any big problems following this pattern. If I wash the pan from the bread machine and clean out the machine would it be ok to share with gluten-bread baking? Or is there something different about baking bread that would make this more "dangerous" than regular cooking.

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I saw those a while back, but alas...no cashews either! Do you think almonds would work?

I expect almonds would work - the flavor would be a bit different but probably just as good. You probably should use blanched almonds.

I did see a recipe somewhere the other day for an almond "cream cheese" that I think I'm going to try.

Oh yes - PLEASE post the recipe if you find you like it.

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I expect almonds would work - the flavor would be a bit different but probably just as good. You probably should use blanched almonds.

Oh yes - PLEASE post the recipe if you find you like it.

http://www.livingtreecommunity.com/recipes.asp#26

Here's the link. It's called Habib's Raw Nut Cheese. The semester started today so I don't know whether I'll get to start it tonight or wait til the weekend. But if I get to it before you, I'll let you know how it goes.

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