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I have wondered for awhile what my genes were, I told DH that from what I have seen of others here that I thought I was DQ1, I was right, twice. He was sure I would have a 'celiac' gene because I was so extremely sick at diagnosis. I thought since my neuro symptoms were present since childhood but GI only became a problem after kids were born that I was going to have 'gluten intolerance' genes.

After my bout with diverticulitis I have just not been the same so I decided to test for other sensitivities. My worst fears are realized with soy and casien showing up. I have recently challenged soy so this was no surprise but I did think I would be okay with dairy. Not much let to eat, wish I had that pizza yesterday.

Egg, Yeast, and Soy Food Sensitivity Stool Panel

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 6 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 6 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 11 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Cow's Milk Protein Sensitivity Stool Test

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 12 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Isn't dq1 different from dq9?

I think you're the first I've read with a dq9.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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Isn't dq1 different from dq9?

I think you're the first I've read with a dq9.

I think it is the subtype that is 9,9 at the very end, is that what you refer to? I don't understand what exactly subtype means unless it is a further narrowing in the genetic pool. Hopefully someone will post with more insight.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

Ravenwoodglass - I think you're a double DQ 3 (subtype 9), not DQ 1. My ds is a double 3 also (subtype 7.) He's 12 and his symptoms are only neurological at this point....no GI involvment. It sounds like the same pattern that you had (have.) I hear you about the no dairy, no soy....my dd and I are living that one right now, and it can be limiting. Thank goodness my dd is not a picky eater or I don't know what we'd do!!!

Rho

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Ravenwoodglass - I think you're a double DQ 3 (subtype 9), not DQ 1.

That is correct. I don't know why the subtypes of three are referred as the dq but that is what I've read of everyone's posts.

I have DQ7 (or 3 subtype 7) along with the DQ2. The subtype 8 of the DQ3 is referred to as DQ8 the celiac gene. Makes me wonder why the DQ8 has been considered a celiac gene and not the 7 or the 9. Isn't DQ2 the most common celiac gene that they've identified though.

The 7 is 0301; 8 is 0302; and the 9 is 0303.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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Thanks for the attempt to clarify. So I am a double DQ3, I take it this means both my parents contributed one DQ3 gene, am I right on that?


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Thanks for the attempt to clarify. So I am a double DQ3, I take it this means both my parents contributed one DQ3 gene, am I right on that?

Yep, you got one from each parent you all your children will have one copy. I'd probably refer to you as double DQ9 though since the subtypes are what are referred to with the three's anyway.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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Hi Ravenwoodglass,

In case you're feeling alone in gene land, here are my new results:

A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 10 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 7 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 893 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow

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Hi Ravenwoodglass,

In case you're feeling alone in gene land, here are my new results:

A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 10 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 7 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 893 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow

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