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Joni63

Glutino Pizza Crust And Tinkyada Pasta

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I've tried Glutino Pizza Crusts twice and didn't like the way they came out either time. The first time I 'toasted' the crust in the oven before adding toppings and it came out too hard and crispy. The second time I added the toppings first and then put it in the oven and it was too doughy.

Is it that hard to get this right or am I just being too picky?

I've had different breads and some are more heavy than others. I tend to like the lighter ones so maybe I need to find a lighter crust? Any suggestions for brands of pizza crusts that would be lighter?

Also, I can't get the pasta to come out right either. Either not done or done too much. I like my pasta al dente and can't seem to get it to come out like that.

I read all these threads about people trying pretzels and breads and pie crusts. I love to do that but am NOT even close to considering it when I can't even cook pasta or heat a pizza crust up right! LOL!

Baby steps....right?

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The only tinkyada I've had luck with 'al dente' with is the spaghetti. I don't normally go for al dente though, so I'm not much help there. For pizza crusts, my favorite is the Whole Foods Gluten-free Bakery crusts, they come out a tiny bit squishy in the middle, but that might have something to do with the inordinate amount of toppings my boyfriend heaps on there...... It will be hard for you to find a lighter pizza crust gluten-free, the nature of gluten-free flours doesn't stick together as well and is harder to make thinner doughs with.

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I've never tried the Glutino crusts--I either use Gluten Free Pantry French Bread dough or a recipe for pizza crust I have that uses cornstarch and potato starches (very easy)

For the Tinkada, I boil it a couple of minutes less than the shortest time called for in the directions on the bag. I start tasting it at that point, and drain it when it's barely done the way I like it. It is easy to overcook--you have to keep on it :D

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Thank you both.

I will try a different pizza crust or (cough, cough) attempt to make one myself. :P

I will time the pasta a couple minutes earlier next time. I don't like it mushy. <_<

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I've had a heck of a time with Tinkyada myself. I know there are folks who swear by it. Maybe it is a question of personal taste, the local water, or something. It seems to go from crunchy to mushy on me; sometimes it is both, depending on the shape. I can't get it al dente, even when I carefully follow directions, test constantly, etc.

Other gluten free pastas I don't have the same problem with. You may need to try something else. My favorite was Bionaturae (nicely al dente), but then I found I shouldn't have soy. Now I like Glutino or quinoa pasta (can't remember the brand name). I've tried some other ones by mail order and liked them, but this isn't too practical.

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I bake the premade crusts on a pizza pan with the holes in the bottom.

This is a recipie that I've been using lately. It makes a light crust that is doughy in a way that I like.

2 2/3 c brown rice flour(or white rice flour)

2 c. tapioca flour

1/2 c. dry milk powder(or Darifree)

4 tsp. xanthan gum

2 tsp. salt

4 tsp. unflavored gelatin powder

3 tsp. Italian seasoning

Combine all ingredients in an aritight container.

At this point you can put 1 1/3 c mix in quart or sandwich size plastic baggies labeled with the remaining ingredients and amounts to make small pizza. Then when you're ready for a pizza just grab a baggie and your pizza comes together quickly. It makes a pretty good sized small pizza. I think this made enough mix for 3 or 4 small pizza mix kits.

For 1 large pizza combine:

2 2/3 c. pizza mix

2 Tb yeast

2 tsp. olive oil

2 tsp. vinegar

1 tsp. sugar

1 1/3 c. warm water

for 1 small pizza:

1 1/3 c. pizza mix

1 Tb. yeast

1 tsp. olive oil

1 tsp. vinegar

1/2 tsp. sugar

2/3 c. warm water

Preheat oven to 425* Place dry ingredients in a mixer bowl and add wet ingredients. Mix 'till smooth. Add a small amount of water if it is too dry or a small amount of flour if it is too sticky. Pat out dough onto a pizza pan. Sprinkle with a little rice flour to prevent hands from sticking. Make edges a little thicker. Bake 10 min. Remove from oven, Spread crust with sauce and toppings. Bake 15 min. more.

In my experience this dough is very soft and sticks easily so I oil my hands and use the lightest dusting of flour to avoid adding too much flour and making the dough hard.

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hathor, that's exactly what happens to me. Once it was really hard in the middle and very soft on the edges. I haven't seen Bionaturae anywhere yet, do you buy that at a regular grocery store? I don't want to do mail order either.

missy's mom, I haven't stocked with any flours or gluten free items for 'from scratch' cooking yet.

Can the powder milk be replaced with regular or soy milk? And where do you find unflavored gelatin, would it be in the regular gelatin isle with the box mixes?

I'm so paranoid to bake things from scratch. I just told my mom the other day "I just don't enjoy baking, I don't mind cooking dinners/meals/soups but baking is another story". I'm one to stress over a cupcake box mix and never could get the correct amount of batter in the pan so it would rise to the normal looking cupcake size, lol.

Can you buy pans with holes for small size pizzas?

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Bi-Aglut (sp?) pasta is really good. Many people say that it behaves like the real thing. For pizza crusts we like the Kinnikinnick crusts. I usually let them thaw for about 10-15 minutes and then place them in the oven for a few minutes on a pan rubbed with a bit of olive oil. Then I remove the crust, add my toppings and bake for a couple more minutes. This makes the crust crunchy and less flaky. My son loves pizza made this way. I hope this helps.

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Another good tip is to remember to rinse the pasta with some cool water. Otherwise it continues to cook even after drained. (I never knew this until someone pointed it out to me).

-Jessica :rolleyes:

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hathor, that's exactly what happens to me. Once it was really hard in the middle and very soft on the edges. I haven't seen Bionaturae anywhere yet, do you buy that at a regular grocery store? I don't want to do mail order either.

I've seen Bionaturae at Whole Foods & several other food coop/health food type places. I haven't seen it at a regular grocery store that I can recall. If you find it, be sure to check the label. They also make wheat pasta.

I do rinse my Tinkyada -- doesn't seem to make any difference. Glutino has the same ingredients, I don't rinse that, and it ends up fine. I think people just have different tastes.

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I've seen Bionaturae at Whole Foods & several other food coop/health food type places. I haven't seen it at a regular grocery store that I can recall. If you find it, be sure to check the label. They also make wheat pasta.

I do rinse my Tinkyada -- doesn't seem to make any difference. Glutino has the same ingredients, I don't rinse that, and it ends up fine. I think people just have different tastes.

Really? I thought Glutino had corn in it... I better look again next time I'm there.

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I think the best pasta is BiAglut imported from Italy. It is made by Heinz. I too start checking it in about five mnutes & take it out when its the way I like it. Once it starts to boils heavy I do turn the fire down so it boils softly..... I also heat it up with no problems.

For pizza shells already made I buy Foods By George shells. I do prebake all the shells for about five minutes before adding any toppings. this seems to help them from being soggy on the middle. Go easy on the sauce too helps....Pizza stones I think also make then turn out better.

Jules Pizza in Doylestown, Pa now sells their dough As well as Everybody Eats, Joan's gfgreatbakes, whole foods....

I am not a fan of Kinnickinnick shells to me they taste like a bisquick dough (way to sweet) & not the traditional Italian crust. I want the real deal crust....

mamaw

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missy's mom, I haven't stocked with any flours or gluten free items for 'from scratch' cooking yet.

Can the powder milk be replaced with regular or soy milk? And where do you find unflavored gelatin, would it be in the regular gelatin isle with the box mixes?

Can you buy pans with holes for small size pizzas?

If you want to ease into it you can mix the mix one day, set it aside and another day assemble your baggies and then another day try mixing and baking one. Less stress that way. ;) That's what I did the first time.

Yes, that's where the unflavor gelatin usually is.

It might work to use warm milk instead of the water and then omit the powder.

I've only seen the large size pizza pans with holes. If you use them with fresh dough you have to be careful about pressing it down too hard, and oiling the pan enough or the dough will stick in the holes. I use a regular baking sheet for the pizza recipie.

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Really? I thought Glutino had corn in it... I better look again next time I'm there.

The Glutino pasta I have is made with ground brown rice, rice bran & water. For some reason, the Glutino web site just calls them brown rice pastas and doesn't show the ingredients (leastways, I can't find where they do ...) But here is someone showing the ingredients:

http://www.glutensmart.com/gpasta.html

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The Glutino pasta I have is made with ground brown rice, rice bran & water. For some reason, the Glutino web site just calls them brown rice pastas and doesn't show the ingredients (leastways, I can't find where they do ...) But here is someone showing the ingredients:

http://www.glutensmart.com/gpasta.html

Oh, bugger, I was looking at Glutano. I think one of them should sue the other so we don't get confused anymore.....

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For pizza crust I really like Namaste. You just add a few ingredients and it is ready. It has never been gooy inside, and my husband LOADS it with toppings!

They also make a killer brownie mix that is to die for. I have not tried the other products, but so far I have not been dissappointed.

I am not much help on the pasta, I have trouble too.

Kat.

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I used to have problems with Tinkyada as well. I now can get it to turn out really well, just like semolina pasta.

I boil the water, add the pasta, stir until its boiling again, cover, remove from heat, stir every 4 minutes, test frequently after 12 minutes cooking time. When you drain it, rinse with cold water thoroughly so that all pasta is cold, even the stuff at the bottom of the colander.

This has worked really well for me. The key is stirring it periodically while its cooking and then rinsing thoroughly with COLD water.

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I made some spinach Tinkyada a couple days ago and managed to get it to be al dente. The key for me was to NOT bring the water to a rolling boil. It was only simmering when I added the pasta, but I was running late (the sauce was ready ... I had forgotten to turn on the water for the pasta.) I thought "what the heck, I'll experiment." So I reduced the heat so it would simmer the entire time & never come to a rolling boil. I also checked frequently and rinsed with cold water (but I already did that before when I got an immediate transition from crunchy to mushy).

We had previously tried the energy efficient method shown on the package but ended up with the same mush.

My family couldn't even believe this was Tinkyada pasta they were having :D The difference was that noticeable.

I guess my next task is to try this technique with a regular Tinkyada pasta.

I don't mind the simmer method if it is going to work. It takes a big pot of water so long to come to a truly rolling boil. But my husband is such a stickler for waiting and not going with a few little bubbles.

I wonder now if people's varying experiences with Tinkyada depends on how they define "boiling" :lol:

It is strange that I can get al dente pasta with rolling boils for other pasta brands, though ... Oh well B)

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Oh darn! I just came from shopping and think I saw the Namaste products in the store. I'll probably go back in a month to get more supplies and I'll check it out if it's not real expensive.

So many things are so overpriced. My mom bought me a Tastefully Gluten Free Baking mix and it has a recipe for pizza crust. I also bought a Brown Rice Baking mix from Fearn, very cheap and think I might use it for pancakes. Anyone try any of these brands?

I think both of your methods work because this pasta must have to cook slower. Whether it is a slower boil or just soaking in hot water. It must just cook too fast at higher temperatures. I will experiment next time and definately cook it at a lower temp. Thanks for the tips!

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I mentioned this crust on another thread. It was almost like regular pizza.Recipe Finder

Recipe Finder

All-Purpose Nearly Normal Gluten-Free Pizza

The Washington Post, August 8, 2007

Course: Main Course

Summary:

The basic flour mix takes 10 minutes to put together. This recipe will make more of the mix than you need to make the pizza. Store the extra in the refrigerator or a cool place.

This deep-dish-style pizza takes about an hour and 45 minutes, start to finish, including making the basic flour mix.

Makes one 12-inch pizza

Ingredients:

For the basic flour mix

1 cup white rice flour

1 cup potato starch (not potato flour)

1 cup cornstarch, plus more for dusting (optional)

1/2 cup corn flour

1/2 cup tapioca flour or tapioca starch

4 teaspoons xanthan gum

For the pizza

3 tablespoons milk powder

1/4 teaspoon dried oregano

1 to 2 pinch garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast (1 envelope)

2 large egg whites, slightly beaten

2 tablespoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon cider vinegar

3/4 cup warm water (at least 100 degrees), or as needed

Cornmeal, for dusting

1 large egg white, slightly beaten

3/4 to 1 cup store-bought or homemade pizza sauce or tomato puree

3 cups freshly grated cheese, such as mozzarella or Parmigiano-Reggiano; or ricotta or sliced provolone

1/2 cup assorted toppings, such as chopped herbs or olives, artichoke hearts or roasted peppers

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Have ready a lightly greased 12-inch pizza pan, or use a pizza baking stone.

For the basic flour mix: Combine the ingredients in a container with a tight-fitting lid. Measure out 1 1/2 cups and set aside; cover and store the remaining flour mix in the refrigerator or in a cool place for another use.

For the pizza: In the large bowl of a stand mixer, combine the milk powder, dried oregano, garlic powder to taste, salt and yeast. In a large measuring cup, combine the egg whites, olive oil, vinegar and some of the warm water. Add the wet mixture to the dry ingredients. Using the stand mixer or a hand-held mixer on low speed, add the basic flour mix and beat until combined. Add the remaining warm water as needed to achieve a firm dough that can still be spread. Increase the speed to high and beat for about 3 minutes.

Sprinkle cornmeal on the pizza pan or baking stone; dust your hands with cornstarch, if desired, to reduce the stickiness in handling the dough. Use a flat spoon to spread the dough into a 12-inch circle, creating a raised edge to contain the pizza topping. Let the dough rest for about 10 minutes, then brush the edges with the beaten egg white. Bake for about 15 minutes, then remove from the oven to spread the center with pizza sauce and cover with toppings. Bake for 20 minutes, or until the cheese is bubbly. Serve hot.

Recipe Source:

From Jules E.D. Shepard's "Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating" (BookSurge, 2007).

Tested by Kim O'Donnel for The Washington Post.

E-mail the Food Section with recipe questions.Print This Recipe

E-mail This Recipe

Nutrition Facts

Serving size: Per slice without toppings (based on 10)

Calories: 381

% Daily Values*

Total Fat: 10g 15

Saturated Fat: 4g 20

Cholesterol: 19mg 6

Sodium: 256mg 11

Total Carbohydrates: 55g 18

Dietary Fiber: 3g 12

Protein: 14g

*Percent Daily Value based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Total Fat: Less than 65g

Saturated Fat: Less than 20g

Cholesterol: Less than 300mg

Sodium: Less than 2,400mg

Total Carbohydrates: 300g

Dietary Fiber: 25g

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I used to have problems with Tinkyada as well. I now can get it to turn out really well, just like semolina pasta.

I boil the water, add the pasta, stir until its boiling again, cover, remove from heat, stir every 4 minutes, test frequently after 12 minutes cooking time. When you drain it, rinse with cold water thoroughly so that all pasta is cold, even the stuff at the bottom of the colander.

This has worked really well for me. The key is stirring it periodically while its cooking and then rinsing thoroughly with COLD water.

I echo this method. Tinkyada turns out perfect every time. Before I started using this method about a year ago, I always had mush or under done pasta. (I don't think to stir it every 4 minutes, but definitely a couple of times during the cooking. Guhlia's timing for stiring is probably best. I'll try that.)

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I have had a lot of problems in the beginning making pasta with many brands, then found Tinkyada pasta with not much success at first but at least it tasted like pasta. Then started using the quick and energy-saving cooking method and cut the time by one minute. My pasta usually works every time if I rinse it right away. Tinkyada is the only brand that my sister and I use in our households.

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