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leelee20

Why Is gluten-free Food So Freaking Expensive?

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I never noticed how expensive healthy gluten-free food is until I actually started paying for it. I'm in college and it's a lot easier than I thought to avoid gluten. There's usually some variety of fish and rice and veggies (the vegan section is usually safe) at the dining hall. I dont eat red meat or dairy (I think I may be intolerant of dairy) and usually dont eat poultry, which makes the whole gluten allergy even more of a pain in the ass, but I'm a health freak and I would probably go vegan if it weren't for the celiac. But the thing is I can't afford to buy gluten-free bread, granola bars etc. AND wholefoods is literally a 5 minute walk, it's sooooo tempting that last night I caved and bought muffins :(. I also bought edamame and it was 3.99 for 9 fricken ounces...:(...that's like 4 servings.... I've already spent about $30 in groceries and I've been here a week. . .plus I can't eat at fast food places with all the new people i've met (I mean I go and either dont eat or eat and get sick). no college student has $10 to blow on good sushi, so it's not like I'm gonna be like "hey guys lets go to (insert wicked expensive sushi place)". everyone is broke. I dont understand why this stuff is so freaking expensive. Why does a salad cost more than a sandwich? Are rice and corn really that much more expensive to grow than wheat? I feel like these companies are screwing us. I blow so much freaking money on food. sorry for the rant. <_<

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My wallet feels your pain Sweetie B)

I used to be able to eat on 100-150 $ a month (I am single) and my monthly food bill is now about 400$

that is just wrong. Not to mention all the supplements I HAVE to take , special vitamins& stuff.

I can tell u how to make your own granola if you want.... it's inexpensive (I make it once a month and keep it in bags in the freezer)

pm me if you want the recipe. you have so many options too it's fun :)

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It's true that the price per gluten-free item usually costs more than the gluten-containing ones.

Perhaps you're even spending more on groceries than before... but that doesn't mean your spending more over all.

I spend more on groceries then before, but I'm not hungry as often (before I was starving, literally, 24/7 and always had to eat. I'd often order large pizzas and eat them by myself. btw, I weigh 163 lbs). And I don't eat out as often. And I'm sure I'll save thousands in medical bills now.

I'd say I was spending about $150 on groceries before. But I'd order pizza twice a week, that's $40 per week/160 a month. I'd eat out 3-4 times a week, that's $60 bucks or so/240 a month. Now I spend about 350-400 a month, almost all just on regular groceries. As you can see, I spend more on groceries now but less on food.

Planning your budget well really helps. I make sure that 400 a month on food if I need to.

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There are a few reasons, actually why gluten free food is more expensive.

One. Yes, corn is becoming expensive to grow. Now that there's been a push for ethanol, which is made from corn, more and more farmers are actually growing their corn, and are even being asked to do this by the government, for fuel and not for food. Corn prices are going up because of skyrocketing demand. Whereas, wheat has been hybridized to have higher gluten content, as well as shipped and grown all over the world for its prized protein content. It's quite a bit cheaper.

Two. Other gluten-free flour choices - the real pocket buster. There just aren't the same amount of crops dedicated to other gluten-free grains that there are for gluten grains. It's an unfortunate situation.

Three. Dedicated baking facilities - few and far between. With wheat flour being sooooo cheap, in order to be cost effective, it's easier to start up a regular baking/cooking facility than a gluten free one, whether that business be small or large. In fact, there's now a gluten free bakery in L.A. that had a blog talking about their experience trying to convert a regular bakery into a gluten free one. It was a huge process.

What we have to look forward to is that more and more people are getting diagnosed so that more gluten free choices are becoming available. As more choices are available, and entrepreneurs see that there is a profitable market that is relatively untapped, we will eventually see prices drop. There is also research being done for various drugs (vaccinations, oral therapy) that will at some point be available (maybe as soon as 5-7 years from now for the enzyme oral therapy which will help with cross contamination) so that the diet won't be quite as restrictive. In the meantime, we just have to spend a fortune!

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...I'm a health freak and I would probably go vegan if it weren't for the celiac.

It is possible to be vegan and avoid gluten. Not to volunteer advice when it isn't precisely being sought :rolleyes: If you do want to talk about this, you could start a thread on that topic. (Or search -- is has come up before). I also know some vegetarian gluten-free forums I could direct to you. If you want ...

I realize that things can be harder at college. My daughter calls herself "a vegetarian with vegan tendencies." I found myself eating fish on a cruise this summer because it was that or starve. So I can understand you can't always get the food you want. Or at the price you want. :(

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Healthy gluten-free food is actually pretty inexpensive. It's the pre-packaged junk replacement stuff that'll kill your wallet. I know it's hard in college though :(

I know, it's not so much gluten free food that's expensive, it's more the gluten free replacement stuff that I crave that I'm used to eating (not everyday but a few times a week): rice crust frozen pizza, whole foods banana bread, muffins, brownies etc etc. I just feel like I'm not getting enough carbs because all I eat is fish and vegetables and fruit. plus the replacement foods were the only fattening food I ate before I went to college, and I'm a little underweight so I could afford to eat them and they actually filled me up.

I used to eat like 5-6 small meals a day and now I can only go to the dining hall 10 times a week. so I just end up stealing tons of fruit. I feel like when you dont eat as many carbs you need to eat more often, maybe thats it, i dunno.

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It is possible to be vegan and avoid gluten. Not to volunteer advice when it isn't precisely being sought :rolleyes: If you do want to talk about this, you could start a thread on that topic. (Or search -- is has come up before). I also know some vegetarian gluten-free forums I could direct to you. If you want ...

I realize that things can be harder at college. My daughter calls herself "a vegetarian with vegan tendencies." I found myself eating fish on a cruise this summer because it was that or starve. So I can understand you can't always get the food you want. Or at the price you want. :(

I think when I'm supporting myself and have a kitchen (sometime in the distant future lol) I'll go vegan but it's too hard when you have no kitchen, and some of the more substantial vegan dishes at my shcool (like tofu-stuffed shells with marinara sauce) are not gluten-free. I know it's possible to go vegan and be gluten-free but as you said, sometimes the only options are eating animal products or going hungry. Plus my mother would nag me ;) But I would love a link to vegetarian gluten free forums, maybe I could find recipes to freeze and bring back to college the next time I go home.

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My wallet feels your pain Sweetie B)

I used to be able to eat on 100-150 $ a month (I am single) and my monthly food bill is now about 400$

that is just wrong. Not to mention all the supplements I HAVE to take , special vitamins& stuff.

I can tell u how to make your own granola if you want.... it's inexpensive (I make it once a month and keep it in bags in the freezer)

pm me if you want the recipe. you have so many options too it's fun :)

a recipe for granola would be awesome, I pay $6 a bag! (well, its a huge bag, lasts me like a week) at wholefoods for "bakery on main extreme fruit and nut granola" its amazing.

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Dear leelee20,

I am in college as well. I am getting ready to pursue my Bachelor's. If you have a can opener and a microwave, you will be in good shape. Another idea is when you go home to make up your food to last until you go home again. I live at home, and am stuck sharing a kitchen. However, after more than a year of being gluten-free, I am finally learning how to get more done with less effort. I also am on a tight budget due to medical bills and college costs.

In order to welcome you to the forum, I have a little present for you! I have a list that should really help. This is overwhelming. I went through this with myself a little more than a year ago. You spend most of your day cooking and cleaning obsessively. The rest you are on the phone with reps from companies trying to find out what is safe. I decided to save you the trouble!

1. There are a number of things in the regular grocery that are safe. Some things are labeled already. Wal-Mart's Great Value brand has numerous things you can eat.

2. For the love of God use Coupons on items you are allowed to eat. People can get them and print them out online even. Call some of the local stores and ask if they accept online coupons.

3. Check the ads online and in the newspaper. You would be surprised how many people do not do this.

4. Some items like rice flour and rice noodles are safe to buy at the Chinese or oriental market. The merchants are more than happy to help you if you cannot read the label.

Now, here is my list of great things to get you started:

Condiments:

Smart Balance Margarine*

Crisco Shortening

Crisco Oil

Pompeiian Olive Oil

Great Value soy sauce

Heinz Ketchup

Lea & Perrins Worchestershire Sauce (all Lea & Perrins Products are safe)

Sweet Baby Ray's Barbecue Sauce

Kraft French Fat-Free Salad Dressing

Kraft Thousand Island Fat-Free Salad Dressing

Pace Picante Sauce

Ortega Salsa

All Classico Red and *White sauces

All Jif Peanut Butters including Smooth Sensations

Welch's Grape Jelly

Cool Whip*

Philadelphia Cream Cheese*

Miracle Whip

Daisy Sour Cream (fat-free, low-fat, regular)*

Snack Foods:

Utz Potato Chips (Found at Sam

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I know, it's not so much gluten free food that's expensive, it's more the gluten free replacement stuff that I crave that I'm used to eating (not everyday but a few times a week): rice crust frozen pizza, whole foods banana bread, muffins, brownies etc etc. I just feel like I'm not getting enough carbs because all I eat is fish and vegetables and fruit. plus the replacement foods were the only fattening food I ate before I went to college, and I'm a little underweight so I could afford to eat them and they actually filled me up.

I used to eat like 5-6 small meals a day and now I can only go to the dining hall 10 times a week. so I just end up stealing tons of fruit. I feel like when you dont eat as many carbs you need to eat more often, maybe thats it, i dunno.

A lot of the time for a meal I'll chop up a bunch of veggies, add a can of garbanzo beans, olive oil (that's the key) and salt...it's super cheap and filling. If you live near a trader joes you can get inexpensive packages of nuts and seeds. They have the "processed in a shared facility" warning but I've never reacted. If you're living on fruit maybe you can at least add a bit of nut butter...not expensive and also filling...

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I keep bags and cans of garbanzo's (I love HUMMUS and it's so easy to make)

Sorry everyone for the distraction, I have been studying for my Reiki Master certification B)

I love granola. Ever since I was a kid. And it's so easy to make. You can be basic or fancy it up.

I love cranberry|vanilla|almond

I love maple|pecan (I add a c. of ground flax to this)

I have a blend I call "good morning sunshine" and all the ingrdients were something "sunny" and happy lol (I know I am such a dork) it's got dried apricots, sunflower seeds, honey, dried pineapple, and those pertrified banana slices you get in the bulk foods and candied ginger (if you can afford it, or a 1/4 tsp ginger powder)

I just made some with apricots|pistachios turned out yum

you use the fruits you love, I was just showing you how creative you can be.

Basic Granola

8 c old fashioned oats (gluten safe)

1 c sweetener of your choice (honey or maple syrup) honey IS sweeter

2 tb vanilla

1 1/2 c nuts|seeds

2 c dried fruits

1/4 ts cinnamon

nutmeg or ginger, whatever seems to compliment your fruits and your palate ;)

Preheat your oven to325F

Prepare 2 cookie sheets (I like to line mine with foil)

Chop up your fruits, set aside.

In a humongous bowl (I use my spaghetti pot lol) measure out 8 cups of oats, nuts, sweetener, spices, vanilla and mix well with a wooden spoon. You don't add the fruit until the granola is out of the oven and semi-cooled. Pour oat mixture evenly onto the 2 cookie sheets. Put in oven and set timer to 45 minutes.

You are going to check the granola every 15 minutes, and stir if needed. At 30 minutes switch the trays in the oven to keep the browning even.

When the timer goes off, take the trays out and put them on the top of the stove to cool you let it cool about 30 minutes and you can put your fruit on it.

Wait until the moisture is no longer emitting from the granola before you try and store it or stir it.

I keep mine in the freezer to ensure freshness, in ziplock bags (big ones lol) and whenever I want a bowl I just scoop it out. It's SOOOOOO good with soymilk! :lol:

hope you guys have fun :)

lovelove

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I think when I'm supporting myself and have a kitchen (sometime in the distant future lol) I'll go vegan but it's too hard when you have no kitchen, and some of the more substantial vegan dishes at my shcool (like tofu-stuffed shells with marinara sauce) are not gluten-free. I know it's possible to go vegan and be gluten-free but as you said, sometimes the only options are eating animal products or going hungry. Plus my mother would nag me ;) But I would love a link to vegetarian gluten free forums, maybe I could find recipes to freeze and bring back to college the next time I go home.

NoGluGirl already mentioned vegiac.com, which caters (ha ha) to both vegetarians and vegans. There is a gluten-free issues forum at www.drmcdougall.com (the McDougall diet is pretty much vegan, except there is no restriction on honey). There are two Yahoo groups for the gluten-free, one for vegetarians and one for vegans. The vegan one has a large number of recipes in the files.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/vegetariangf/

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Vegan-and-Gluten-Free/

www.fatfreevegan.com has a gluten-free section. If you go to www.recipezaar.com you can search for gluten-free and vegan. I find that a number of countries have vegan dishes. Once I have the names I can find recipes online. For instance, I really like Ethiopian and last night made some spicy collards. I haven't found a source online for 100% teff injera unfortunately; we ate the stuff instead with hemp tortillas. I make a lot of Thai veggie stirfries now, and put them over 100% buckwheat soba noodles or brown rice. (For the sauce, I use light coconut milk and add a heaping spoonful of red or green Thai chili paste, then thicken with arrowroot). There are many Indian dishes that are possibilities.

Of course, general vegetarian or vegan cookbooks or web sites have recipes that are gluten-free or can be converted (use of gluten-free pasta, substituting quinoa or kasha for bulgur or couscous, thickening with cornstarch or arrowroot instead of wheat flour, etc.) One of my favorites is a baked risotto that is really simple. All you need is arborio rice and veggie broth, then you stir whatever veggies and seasonings you want into it at the end. I only know of book with recipes that are all vegan and gluten-free, and that is "Food Allergy Survival Guide." It avoids other common allergens as well, like soy. It also has information about nutrition and menu planning. (The recipes are a little fatty for my preference, but that can be adjusted).

Of course, all these wonderful recipes don't help you now without a kitchen. If I were you, I would get a big bag of potatoes first thing. Surely you have access to a microwave? You can get the carbs you want that way and I find potatoes very satisfying. You can dress them up all different ways for variety -- with salsa, canned beans, refried beans or bean dip, hummus, soy "sour cream" or cheese, veggie chili or lentil soup (you can find this in cans or in cups to which you add boiling water), or seasonings like Mrs. Dash, Old Bay Seasoning, or whatever you like. Sweet potatoes work as well. Still assuming I was you, I would get some bags of rice, popcorn, or corn cakes, and some peanut butter and hummus. (I am assuming access to refridgeration for the last one; I once ate some fuzzy hummus because I wasn't paying attention and got realllllly sick ...) Also with a fridge, you could keep some corn tortillas (or the Food for Life brown rice ones if you can find them inexpensively) and dress them up with beans & salsa (or hummus) and whatever veggies you might have.

I would then hit the dining hall for what I could find in the way of plain veggies (bringing my own seasoning), salad (either my own dressing or using vinegar), rice and fruit.

Let's see what else would I buy? Probably not TJ's nuts because I HAVE reacted to them :D But really having nuts and dried fruit around would be nice. I can't remember how expensive Lara Bars or Glutino breakfast bars are, but I really like them, so I would splurge if necessary. And, being a college student, I would have microwavable popcorn.

If any other ideas occur to me, I'll post again.

As far as going out, yes, that is tough. I hope other college students can help you out there. Is there a Middle Eastern place around campus? They frequently ARE cheap and you can get hummus, baba ghanouj, or falafel (assuming the latter isn't made with wheat). If you explain your situation (perhaps call in advance) you might get them to give you a plate of veggies for the first two dips rather than the usual pita bread. (Just don't let anybody else dip pita into the stuff ...) If there is Mexican, you might be able to find something acceptable with corn tortillas and beans. Is there a Maggiano's around? They have gluten-free pasta (the chef will even come to the table and figure out what to make for you), make huge servings (so you can have leftovers), and seem to attract lots of college students, a least the ones I've been to. You might have to spend some time in a free afternoon going around the area or calling and seeing what restaurants have or are willing to do for you.

If all else fails, you can take your own food B)

Is there a celiac support group in your school's area? Google and see if you haven't already. They would know about restaurants. But here is one guide; perhaps there is something from this list around you:

http://www.glutenfreekitchen.org/GlutenFre..._Eating_Out.htm

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Dear sickchick,

Congratulations on going for your Reiki certification! :) I have always been interested in it. I would like to learn Q'i Gong. I think it is similar to Reiki, but it is of Chinese origin. It is all so fascinating!

Thank you for the granola recipe! I do not know if I should ever do oats again. They did not set well at all. Some Celiacs tolerate them, some do not. It varies from person to person. All of the suggestions sound delicious!

Dear hathor,

All of that food sounds so good! :) You have given me some ideas! I am working on a cookbook. It is a collaboration with another member on here. Some of his creations make my mouth water! The combinations can be quite unusual, but delicious! One of his ideas is Coconut Peach Custard Pie that is dairy and gluten-free.

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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GluGirl, I am so sorry yo can't tolerate oats. I wonder if you could substitute for quinoa flakes? Does your body tolerate those? (That's funny cause I can't do quinoa lol!) :lol: I used to do QiGong too I wanted to study Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine for a long time. I opted for Reiki because of the spiritual focus. I have love of both :)

Let me know if you guys publish the cookbook I'll buy it!

lovelove

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THANKS NO GLU GIRL :) !! This is a really big help to me too as we are only on Week 1 of the gluten free diet. My 13 year old daughter just got dx with Celiac but I am trying to go gluten free (or at least gluten lightly) with her. I am having bread withdrawal. I'm sure that it will get better though.

I really do appreciate the list because it has been overwhelming to say the least. So thank you.

Virgie

son 17 UC/EE dx 12/04 daughter 13 Celiac Disease dx 9/4/07

Dear leelee20,

I am in college as well. I am getting ready to pursue my Bachelor's. If you have a can opener and a microwave, you will be in good shape. Another idea is when you go home to make up your food to last until you go home again. I live at home, and am stuck sharing a kitchen. However, after more than a year of being gluten-free, I am finally learning how to get more done with less effort. I also am on a tight budget due to medical bills and college costs.

In order to welcome you to the forum, I have a little present for you! I have a list that should really help. This is overwhelming. I went through this with myself a little more than a year ago. You spend most of your day cooking and cleaning obsessively. The rest you are on the phone with reps from companies trying to find out what is safe. I decided to save you the trouble!

1. There are a number of things in the regular grocery that are safe. Some things are labeled already. Wal-Mart's Great Value brand has numerous things you can eat.

2. For the love of God use Coupons on items you are allowed to eat. People can get them and print them out online even. Call some of the local stores and ask if they accept online coupons.

3. Check the ads online and in the newspaper. You would be surprised how many people do not do this.

4. Some items like rice flour and rice noodles are safe to buy at the Chinese or oriental market. The merchants are more than happy to help you if you cannot read the label.

Now, here is my list of great things to get you started:

Condiments:

Smart Balance Margarine*

Crisco Shortening

Crisco Oil

Pompeiian Olive Oil

Great Value soy sauce

Heinz Ketchup

Lea & Perrins Worchestershire Sauce (all Lea & Perrins Products are safe)

Sweet Baby Ray's Barbecue Sauce

Kraft French Fat-Free Salad Dressing

Kraft Thousand Island Fat-Free Salad Dressing

Pace Picante Sauce

Ortega Salsa

All Classico Red and *White sauces

All Jif Peanut Butters including Smooth Sensations

Welch's Grape Jelly

Cool Whip*

Philadelphia Cream Cheese*

Miracle Whip

Daisy Sour Cream (fat-free, low-fat, regular)*

Snack Foods:

Utz Potato Chips (Found at Sam

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I dont understand why this stuff is so freaking expensive.

I was in our overly expensive health food store this morning....and I asked them the question - why does everything gluten free cost so much?

There response was " because they have to put more of the good stuff in, without all the added fillers and other junk. "

sickchick - do you have a good hummus receipe that you would share with us? Thanks for the granola receipe.

Thanks everyone for the lists, it is appreciated, I forget and when I see them again, I get to add more things to our everyday meals and snacks.

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:) Happy Friday everyone!!

Lemon, Sesame, and Garlic Hummus

(I call it "Yummus") hehehe

Makes about 3 1/2 cups

For anyone who doesn't like to eat meat every day, legumes are a great source of plant protein. Serve this hummus with rice crackers or fresh veggie slices for a healthy snack.

1-3 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons white sesame seeds, toasted

2 tablespoons tahini

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 1 (15-ounce) can garbanzo beans, drained, liquid reserved

1 tablespoon orange peel, minced

Salt and white pepper to taste

1 1/2 tablespoons lemon peel, minced

In a blender or food processor, combine garlic, olive oil, sesame seeds, tahini, lemon juice, and garbanzo beans (reserve about a tablespoon of beans for garnish). Blend, adding reserved garbanzo-bean liquid if needed until hummus reaches desired consistency. Season with salt and pepper.

Transfer the mixture to a medium serving bowl. Garnish in the middle with reserved garbanzo beans. Sprinkle orange and lemon peel around the beans. Chill in the refrigerator, tightly covered, until ready to serve.

Per serving: Per 1/4 cup: 75 calories; 2 g protein; 4 g fat; 8 g carb; 2 g fiber.

Sometimes I like to make it with black beans and garlic and cilantro and scoop it up with lowfat corn tortilla chips...

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Dear sickchick,

I am sorry I cannot do oats either! :lol: I have not tried quinoa yet. I hope I tolerate it. I will keep it in mind as a replacement. One thing I miss oatmeal most for is granola, but I also miss no-bake cookies. :( Maybe if I can tolerate the quinoa, I can make them with that.

Thank you for the yummus recipe! :D It sounds good. I love stuff with a lot of flavor. Boring is not in my tastebud's vocabulary! As far as the cookbook goes, I will let you know whenever it is ready for publication. Also, I am going to do a cooking show for Celiacs called "Tastebud Adventures with NoGluGirl" that will be on YouTube for easy access. I will let you know about it as well when it is time.

Dear Virgie,

You are so welcome! I know this is tough. You have to get new pans, new utensils, new everything! :blink: It really is daunting. However, with organization, it is possible. Having to worry about everything from soaps to toothpastes is awful, but this list helps people get a good, safe start.

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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One. Yes, corn is becoming expensive to grow. Now that there's been a push for ethanol, which is made from corn, more and more farmers are actually growing their corn, and are even being asked to do this by the government, for fuel and not for food. Corn prices are going up because of skyrocketing demand. Whereas, wheat has been hybridized to have higher gluten content, as well as shipped and grown all over the world for its prized protein content. It's quite a bit cheaper.

Two. Other gluten-free flour choices - the real pocket buster. There just aren't the same amount of crops dedicated to other gluten-free grains that there are for gluten grains. It's an unfortunate situation.

Three. Dedicated baking facilities - few and far between. With wheat flour being sooooo cheap, in order to be cost effective, it's easier to start up a regular baking/cooking facility than a gluten free one, whether that business be small or large. In fact, there's now a gluten free bakery in L.A. that had a blog talking about their experience trying to convert a regular bakery into a gluten free one. It was a huge process.

This is a good list. I would also add that since the size of the market into the equation. Manufacturers are unable to take advanage of "economies of scale" like they would if they were producing a higher volume.

Also, they charge higher prices because they can.

It is hard when one does not have access to a kitchen to cook from scratch. I have been able to keep our grocery bill almost the same as it was pre-celiac disease, but it is because I buy almost no prepared gluten-free food. Would you be allowed to get a crock pot or hotplate to cook more meals for yourself?

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Dear cruelshoes,

It is true. Supply and demand dictates the prices quite frequently. There is not near as many Celiacs as non-Celiacs.

Items that are not mass produced are more expensive, because the cost more per unit to make. Specialty foods are always high priced due to this.

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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This is a good list. I would also add that since the size of the market into the equation. Manufacturers are unable to take advanage of "economies of scale" like they would if they were producing a higher volume.

Also, they charge higher prices because they can.

It is hard when one does not have access to a kitchen to cook from scratch. I have been able to keep our grocery bill almost the same as it was pre-celiac disease, but it is because I buy almost no prepared gluten-free food. Would you be allowed to get a crock pot or hotplate to cook more meals for yourself?

There was a spot on the news tonight about food prices going up....and up and up. They said things that have been the same price for several years now are about to explode in price. Wheat is going up - glad that I don't eat that now, lol

Thanks for the hummus receipe! I too will have to replace quinoa with the oats with the granola receipe, I have eaten that before. I think quinoa is one of the oldest grains on earth...It has been around a long, long time. I wish I could remember the story about it... not remembering is still a problem for me with the celiac, I hope within time that will go away.

The people on this board are so helpful, I love coming on here...what a blessing to be able to come to the chat and learn more and more everyday.

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Thanks for the hummus recipe. I like to have different kinds. One of my favorite lunches is to put hummus on a brown rice tortilla, then add in whatever vegetables I have around.

There was an article in the morning paper about wheat prices going up. Oh, cry me a river ... Sorry, I have to go to the grocery store today and I'm still getting used to the sticker shock.

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No Glu Girl I lovelove the title (for the book)...

BRILLIANT! :D

Glad I could be helpful guys xo

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