2 2
lyndao

Can Diphenhydramine Hydrocloride Or Benadryl Be A Possible Treatment?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Long story made short. Can benadryl,taken by capsule be a way to lessen anxiety, rashes etc.

I have done so well on the gluten-free diet after being so sick for so long. WHY?

Maybe I don't have Celiac disease, but only a sensitivity to gluten or a possible deficiency omega fatty acids, and other vitamin deficiencies. I just don't know why I am doing so well on a gluten free diet.

Has anyone done any research into diphenhydramine hydrochloride? or Benadry and its effects on people managing psychiatric symptoms, such as anxiety, depression.

Just know I have not been truly diagnosed at this point with any gluten sensitivity, but why does this diet work so well for people like me who have neurological symptoms of numbing, tingling, rashes, joint pain.

Oh, I want to mention I have NOT been taking benadryl for a while and ONLY took a small dose last night after being itchy. I DO NOT advocate taking diphenhydramine BUT instead; direct to you a link I found at www.wikipedi.org and find an article by Bruce G. Charlton: http://www.hedweb.com/bgcharlton/sdtm.html) Medical Hypotheses.

I do NOT want to mislead but to guide, so people can make up their own minds.

I choose not to eat out at restaurants at the present time. This forum is to help you educate yourself. This forum is to help you be effective self-managers of your disease.

Lynda Lube

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Long story short. I get blood tests tomorrow, if the panel was done right, I should test positive for celiac disease. I may have to get a endoscopy. My recovery on gluten-free diet since Sept 18/07 for a half a day. I started the diet after research into a rash, that reappeared. (I used to get this rash as a child)

Jump forward to last night, I went on the forum to see if Benadryl was safe to take, given I do NOT ingest anything until I know it does NOT have gluten. I took 2 25mg around 2:15am and got up in the morning, wandering WHY I am diminishing my symptoms so fast on this diet???

You see I have been taking benadryl for a least 2 years (one 25mg benadryl) at night cause I was always stuffed up. This is in my medical records in town about taking benadryl at night. My daughter also is always stuffed up, because of dust mite allergies.

Again, why are my symptoms diminishing so fast??

I went to wikipedia.org for the chemical properities of diphenhydramine hydrochloride, VERY interesting. I can't seem to find any other connections between taking DC and helping Celiac people. I will let everyone know about my blood tests, hopefully I can get them back tomorrow. If negative I will be surprised, but there are many other variables to consider.

Lynda Lube, diagnosed with MS/IBS been taking benadryl at night for a few years, low dose 25 mg at night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Long story short. I get blood tests tomorrow, if the panel was done right, I should test positive for celiac disease. I may have to get a endoscopy. My recovery on gluten-free diet since Sept 18/07 for a half a day. I started the diet after research into a rash, that reappeared. (I used to get this rash as a child)

Jump forward to last night, I went on the forum to see if Benadryl was safe to take, given I do NOT ingest anything until I know it does NOT have gluten. I took 2 25mg around 2:15am and got up in the morning, wandering WHY I am diminishing my symptoms so fast on this diet???

You see I have been taking benadryl for a least 2 years (one 25mg benadryl) at night cause I was always stuffed up. This is in my medical records in town about taking benadryl at night. My daughter also is always stuffed up, because of dust mite allergies.

Again, why are my symptoms diminishing so fast??

I went to wikipedia.org for the chemical properities of diphenhydramine hydrochloride, VERY interesting. I can't seem to find any other connections between taking DC and helping Celiac people. I will let everyone know about my blood tests, hopefully I can get them back tomorrow. If negative I will be surprised, but there are many other variables to consider.

Lynda Lube, diagnosed with MS/IBS been taking benadryl at night for a few years, low dose 25 mg at night.

There is currently no treatment for celiac disease, apart from the gluten free diet. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. Benadryl is an antihistamine. As celiac disease is not a hystamine reaction, I don't think it would have any effect. Believe me, if there were a pill that would help fix my celiac disease, I would know about it, and be first in line to go to Domino's Pizza. ;)

Good luck on your bloodwork tomorrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I merged the two topics together since they were similar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it doesn't work that way. benadryl is an antihistamine. basically, it blocks the receptors for histamine on our cells. (some allergy drugs partially prevent mast cells from breaking down and releasing histamine as well.)

celiac disease, however, doesn't have anything to do with the histamine release process (outside of general inflammation elsewhere in the body as a secondary affect). the primary mechanism is one of an IgA and/or IgG (depending on the person) immune response, prompting auto-immune molecule production, which is completely independent of the histamine production path.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


The reason you are doing so well so quickly is simply, that you have stopped eating the foods that were making you sick. The Benadryl has nothing whatsoever to do with it.

I was sick for fifty years, and severely ill with chronic, watery diarrhea, horrendous back pain and unbearable joint and muscle pains the last six or seven months before figuring out the gluten connection.

The day after I stopped eating gluten, the diarrhea stopped, just like that (I didn't have a single day without total blowouts twenty minutes after eating anything before that for six months). The second day the back pain started subsiding. Within two weeks I was off the codeine I had been taking for six years for severe fibromyalgia pain.

I also have lots of allergies and intolerances besides gluten intolerance. I was taking Benadryl at times for food reactions, and it was working for reactions other than gluten. It was completely ineffective when it came to a gluten reaction, because celiac disease is NOT caused by an allergy, but is an immune reaction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I double that - if you quit eating all the offending foods you should notice a huge difference. Your IBS & MS should be gone soon...

Just eat whole foods for a bit... The internal damage will take a while but you should see a steady incline in energy & a lessening in any pain or depression...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There is currently no treatment for celiac disease, apart from the gluten free diet. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. Benadryl is an antihistamine. As celiac disease is not a hystamine reaction, I don't think it would have any effect. Believe me, if there were a pill that would help fix my celiac disease, I would know about it, and be first in line to go to Domino's Pizza. ;)

Good luck on your bloodwork tomorrow.

your right. Benadryl has properties similar to many anit-depressants, so it helps with anxiety, depression. see Bruce G Charlton article called " Self-management of psychiatric symptoms using over-the-counter (OTC) psychopharmacology: The S-DTM therapeutic model of self-diagnosis, self-treatment, self-monitoring. He talks about the history of diphenhydramine and present day prescribed drugs that have similar pharmacological definition of an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). It also writes about St. John's wart, early-morning bright light therapy. The article talks about how people have more access to information due to the web, sharing on forums, people can now become better at self-monitoring,self-diagnosis, self-treatment. lynda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The reason you are doing so well so quickly is simply, that you have stopped eating the foods that were making you sick. The Benadryl has nothing whatsoever to do with it.

I was sick for fifty years, and severely ill with chronic, watery diarrhea, horrendous back pain and unbearable joint and muscle pains the last six or seven months before figuring out the gluten connection.

The day after I stopped eating gluten, the diarrhea stopped, just like that (I didn't have a single day without total blowouts twenty minutes after eating anything before that for six months). The second day the back pain started subsiding. Within two weeks I was off the codeine I had been taking for six years for severe fibromyalgia pain.

I also have lots of allergies and intolerances besides gluten intolerance. I was taking Benadryl at times for food reactions, and it was working for reactions other than gluten. It was completely ineffective when it came to a gluten reaction, because celiac disease is NOT caused by an allergy, but is an immune reaction.

Yes, I agree with you. I am doing so much better on my GFD within 2 weeks, no joint pain, no rashes, clearer thinking, no restless legs. Benadryl seems to help with depression and anxiety which are a part of living with symptoms recognized in Celiac. So, I guess there seems to be a connection between psychiatric symptoms, such as depression and taking benadryl. Benadryl is an example of an unofficial SSRI, which is an old antihistamine with a sedative action, and sold for treating coughs and allergies. Diphenhydramine the root molecule from which fluoxetine/prozac was orginally synthesized. According to Bruce G Charlton there are no clinical trials of diphenhydramine for anxiety, but it does fulfil pharmacological definition of an SSRI (selective seratonin reuptake inhibitor)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You need to be taking B12 for depression... A lot of us take B12...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


I was diagnosed in 2003 with Celiac Disease when I was 38 years old. I have from what the doctors say a severe case of Celiac Disease and I'm severely sensitive to gluten. From what they can see through the many tests done over the years, my small intestines have been severely damaged.

I have been on a gluten free diet for 4 1/2 years now. Checking all products I use that may have gluten in it such as toothpaste, mouth wash, ect.. Also checking on all of my medications I take with the manufactures to make sure they are gluten free too AND if there is any possibility of cross contamination with the other gluten containing products that they make in their plant. I found out that gluten can be used in many forms of medication (tablets, capsules, and elixors) and the only kind that doesn't have any gluten or chance of cross contamination are injectable medications.

I have been working with a pain specialist and a GI doctor who (luckily) know what I am going through and specialize in this field. I've been seeing them for a few months now and they have had me try different medications to see which works better. Last time I was in the hospital the previous doctors were seriously thinking of putting me on IV meds for at home since they worked everytime I've been in the hospital (and for the fact that they are 100% gluten free). But I didn't want to have a central line or pic line put in, let alone be constantly on IV meds. So my new doctors understand how I feel and we've been pretty much going through a "trial and error" period on the different medications and hopefully find something that will help me.

In the hospital although, Benadryl Inj. / 50mg has been one medication I have noticed that always has really helped me with my severe case of celiac. I noticed that when taking it at the same time with my other medications, I seemed to get relief faster and better, rather than not using it at all. Benadryl doesn't work by itself only with your other meds. So I did some research and found out on Benadryl's FAQ web page it states that the OTHER uses for it is as an antispasmatic as well as for a sleep aid, and nausia. Also it stated that even though it doesn't contain gluten there is a chance for cross contamination. Because of that chance, I can't take Benadryl in pill form. I also found out you can get a prescription for it in a pre-made injection pen of 50mg that comes in a package of ten (I guess kinda like an epi pen) and also it's available in vials (like insulin for a diabetic). This to me doesn't sound too bad if given with the right combination of my other medications (with them being appsolutely 100% gluten free pill form). So next time, I see my doctors this is our next thing we'll be trying. Hopefully this will work. It's seems better to take a shot of Benadryl now and then with a severe flare up than having to take all my medications by injections in a central/pic line.

I even have to worry about cross contamination at home with using house hold items such as utensils, plates/cups, pots and pans, etc.. So I have my own that I only use as well as my own pre-made gluten free groceries and even the common items such as butter, peanut butter, etc.. But this is because of how severe my case of Celiac is.

Yes, I know, it's been a "pain" staking ordeal in many ways! But if any of this leads to some type of relief and regain my life back (not to mention not having to go to the hospital anymore!) I think I'll try it.

I hope this has helped you in some way. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On www.glutenfreedrugs.com they only list Benedryl elixir as gluten free. Does anyone know about the pills or capsules? It seems like I've seen it posted that they couldn't guarantee the pills and capsules to be gluten free. It makes me wonder because I was taking them a year ago for itching and getting no relief. Benedryl had always been the one thing that worked years before that. It sure doesn't make sense to take a pill that could have gluten in it when your itching is DH.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe one of the Benedryls contains a dairy product. I think it was the strips or chewables. Really I just can't remember. Call and check if dairy is an issue for you.

Over the years I have noticed that if I take a Benedryl or now Zyrtec, when I have eaten out or had a gluten reaction start, the reaction is not as bad. I still have a reaction, it is just milder and shorter. I also take Motrin for reactions. The reasoning is I am fairly certain that I have a wheat allergy on top of biopsy proven Celiacs. I know my allergic reactions for other things make me swell and itch and feel miserable. I assume when I have been glutened that my intestines are inflammed and causing pain (Motrin helps these) and the Zyrtec just helps calm any allergic reaction that I am having. I still get sick from the gluten, but at least it becomes livable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On www.glutenfreedrugs.com they only list Benedryl elixir as gluten free. Does anyone know about the pills or capsules? It seems like I've seen it posted that they couldn't guarantee the pills and capsules to be gluten free. It makes me wonder because I was taking them a year ago for itching and getting no relief. Benedryl had always been the one thing that worked years before that. It sure doesn't make sense to take a pill that could have gluten in it when your itching is DH.

I found out some more info on Benadryl and just wanted to post it for everyone who is interested. One web page you can go to is Benadryl FAQ web page --- <<CLICK HERE>> that might be able to help you with the various questions you have or another one I found is Benadryl Manufactured by Pfizer Canada --- <<CLICK HERE>>. I just saw my GI doctor yesterday and he told me that I might have something else also with the Celiac Disease that just happens to react to treatment from Benadryl - so it makes sense why in my case it has been helping me. But only when I have received it in my IV when hospitalized because it's 100% gluten free in shot form only. So now I will be giving myself shots of Benadryl at home when needed because my GI doctor said it would greatly benefit me. He said it's common for some people who were diagnosed with Celiac Disease to also be diagnosed with this other thing too (sorry I can't remember what the name of it is but will post it later). I copied and pasted some of the information from the second web page below.

Benadryl

Diphenhydramine HCl

Benadryl - Benadryl Side Effects - Benadryl Information

Indications: Antihistamine, antiemetic and antispasmodic. Allergic diseases such as hay fever, allergic rhinitis, urticaria, angioedema, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, gastrointestinal allergy, pruritus, physical allergies, reactions to injection of contrast media, reactions to therapeutic preparations and allergic transfusion reactions; also postoperative nausea and vomiting, motion sickness, and quieting emotionally disturbed children.

Supplied: Caplets: Each, pink, film-coated caplet, imprinted Benadryl on both sides contains: diphenhydramine HCl 25 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: celluloses, dicalcium phosphate, D&C Red No. 27, PEG, polysorbate, starch, stearic acid, titanium dioxide, wax and zinc stearate. Energy: 0.5 kJ (0.12 kcal). Gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Unit packages of 12 and 24. Bottles of 50 and 100.

Capsules: Each white capsule with pink cap contains: diphenhydramine HCl 50 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose, talc; capsule shell: FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Red No. 3, gelatin, silicon dioxide, sodium lauryl sulfate and titanium dioxide. Energy: 2 kJ (0.47 kcal). Gluten-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Bottles of 100.

Extra Strength Nightime Caplets: Each white film-coated caplet, embossed B on one side and 50 on the other side contains: diphenhydramine HCl 50 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: calcium phosphate, cellulose, crospovidone, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycol, starch, stearic acid, titanium dioxide and wax. Gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Unit packages of 12. Child resistant package.

Cream: Each g of white emulsion for topical use contains: diphenhydramine 2% w/w. Nonmedicinal ingredients: cetyl alcohol, paraben, PEG, propylene glycol and water. Tubes of 30 g.

Elixir: Each 5 mL of red elixir contains: diphenhydramine HCl 12.5 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: alcohol, FD&C Red No. 2, flavoring agents, sugar and water. Energy: 42.7 kJ (10.2 kcal)/5 mL. Gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Plastic bottles of 100 mL.

Children's Liquid: Each 5 mL of colorless, bubble-gum flavored liquid contains: diphenhydramine HCl 6.25 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: artificial bubble gum flavor, carboxymethylcellulose, citric acid, glycerin, saccharin, sodium benzoate, sodium citrate, sorbitol, vanilla flavor and water. Energy: 43.68 kJ (10.4 kcal)/5 mL. Alcohol-, dye-, gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Plastic bottles of 100 mL.

Junior Strength Chewable Tablets: Each light purple, mottled, grape-flavored, scored, round tablet, imprinted Benadryl 12.5 on one side contains: diphenhydramine HCl 12.5 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: aspartame, corn syrup solids, D&C Red No. 27, FD&C Blue No. 1, flavor, magnesium stearate, magnesium trisilicate, monoammonium glycyrrhizinate and tartaric acid. Energy: 9.83 kJ (2.34 kcal). Alcohol-, gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sucrose-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Unit packages of 12.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just wanted to quickly add that I do not advocate Benadryl as a cure for everyone who has Celiac Disease but just to present this information for those interested in looking into it further. This isn't a cure but just something that might help your symptoms. Talking it over with your GI doctor will help decide if this is the right course of treatment for you. Everyone is different and one thing that helps one person might not help another.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question: Are ya'll saying that it helps with other food reactions. I am reacting to soy, corn, rice, and milk products. I don't get D I get severe joint and muscle pain. I am cutting out these foods but do get them in something once in a while and start reacting. Has anyone had success with Benadryl helping with these symptoms?

Yellow Rose

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I found out some more info on Benadryl and just wanted to post it for everyone who is interested. One web page you can go to is Benadryl FAQ web page --- <<CLICK HERE>> that might be able to help you with the various questions you have or another one I found is Benadryl Manufactured by Pfizer Canada --- <<CLICK HERE>>. I just saw my GI doctor yesterday and he told me that I might have something else also with the Celiac Disease that just happens to react to treatment from Benadryl - so it makes sense why in my case it has been helping me. But only when I have received it in my IV when hospitalized because it's 100% gluten free in shot form only. So now I will be giving myself shots of Benadryl at home when needed because my GI doctor said it would greatly benefit me. He said it's common for some people who were diagnosed with Celiac Disease to also be diagnosed with this other thing too (sorry I can't remember what the name of it is but will post it later). I copied and pasted some of the information from the second web page below.

Benadryl

Diphenhydramine HCl

Benadryl - Benadryl Side Effects - Benadryl Information

Indications: Antihistamine, antiemetic and antispasmodic. Allergic diseases such as hay fever, allergic rhinitis, urticaria, angioedema, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, gastrointestinal allergy, pruritus, physical allergies, reactions to injection of contrast media, reactions to therapeutic preparations and allergic transfusion reactions; also postoperative nausea and vomiting, motion sickness, and quieting emotionally disturbed children.

Supplied: Caplets: Each, pink, film-coated caplet, imprinted Benadryl on both sides contains: diphenhydramine HCl 25 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: celluloses, dicalcium phosphate, D&C Red No. 27, PEG, polysorbate, starch, stearic acid, titanium dioxide, wax and zinc stearate. Energy: 0.5 kJ (0.12 kcal). Gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Unit packages of 12 and 24. Bottles of 50 and 100.

Capsules: Each white capsule with pink cap contains: diphenhydramine HCl 50 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose, talc; capsule shell: FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Red No. 3, gelatin, silicon dioxide, sodium lauryl sulfate and titanium dioxide. Energy: 2 kJ (0.47 kcal). Gluten-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Bottles of 100.

Extra Strength Nightime Caplets: Each white film-coated caplet, embossed B on one side and 50 on the other side contains: diphenhydramine HCl 50 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: calcium phosphate, cellulose, crospovidone, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycol, starch, stearic acid, titanium dioxide and wax. Gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Unit packages of 12. Child resistant package.

Cream: Each g of white emulsion for topical use contains: diphenhydramine 2% w/w. Nonmedicinal ingredients: cetyl alcohol, paraben, PEG, propylene glycol and water. Tubes of 30 g.

Elixir: Each 5 mL of red elixir contains: diphenhydramine HCl 12.5 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: alcohol, FD&C Red No. 2, flavoring agents, sugar and water. Energy: 42.7 kJ (10.2 kcal)/5 mL. Gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sodium-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Plastic bottles of 100 mL.

Children's Liquid: Each 5 mL of colorless, bubble-gum flavored liquid contains: diphenhydramine HCl 6.25 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: artificial bubble gum flavor, carboxymethylcellulose, citric acid, glycerin, saccharin, sodium benzoate, sodium citrate, sorbitol, vanilla flavor and water. Energy: 43.68 kJ (10.4 kcal)/5 mL. Alcohol-, dye-, gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Plastic bottles of 100 mL.

Junior Strength Chewable Tablets: Each light purple, mottled, grape-flavored, scored, round tablet, imprinted Benadryl 12.5 on one side contains: diphenhydramine HCl 12.5 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: aspartame, corn syrup solids, D&C Red No. 27, FD&C Blue No. 1, flavor, magnesium stearate, magnesium trisilicate, monoammonium glycyrrhizinate and tartaric acid. Energy: 9.83 kJ (2.34 kcal). Alcohol-, gluten-, lactose-, paraben-, sucrose-, sulfite- and tartrazine-free. Unit packages of 12.

I had a friend with a serverly autistic child, she gave him benadryl anytime they went out. It kept him calm!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a believer in the histamine connection when a celiac is glutened. I was misdiagnosed for 30 plus years (sick for about 10) and I am still struggling to find out who I really am in my "new" body.

I was very sick for many years with too many symptoms to list, including depression, but I was motivated and driven to be successful (or maybe afraid to fail). Considering my poor health I was able to be a productive employee while studying for my MBA degree, remodeling home, etc. and maintaing a srtong desire to advance professionally.

I attribute this to the possibility of elevated blood histamine levels due to Celiac. I feel now that my histamine levels are normal or maybe below average as I feel healthy (not tired) but am much more lazy. I find myself sitting on the couch all day watching TV while I feel well and know that there are many things that should be done. It is just strange to feel much healthier, yet lazier or less motivated to succeed professionally and at home.

After being "glutened" the first clue that something is wrong is a sensation of elevated nervous energy. I am also much more congested nasally after eating gluten and have trouble sleeping. Initally I have much more energy and feel motivated to clear my list of "to-dos", etc.

With all of that said...I can see why an antihistamine might help after being glutened if you react similar to how i do with symptoms driven (maybe) by elevated histamine levels in response to a substance introduced to my body that is known to be toxic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could your doctor have been referring to Leaky Gut as it's commonly called around here, as the "other thing"? Leaky Gut, which I believe has a lovely technical name that I can't remember, creates allergic or histamine reactions to various substances in people with auto-immune disorders. Anti-histamines are of course useful in counteracting allergic responses.

Many people operate under the misconception that an allergic reactions always manifests itself in sneezing, itching or the like. Allergies can cause other types of reactions as well, from neurological ones to upset stomaches, diarrhea and asthma or bronchitis attacks. So it's very possible that an anti histamine does indeed make you feel better because it's masking some other allergic reaction.

And FYI, with leaky gut you can become allergic to any substance that enters your digestive track, even, yes folks, an anti-histamine. I'm living proof of that :rolleyes: Zyrtec makes me sick as a dog, benedryl only mildly effects my allergic reactions and Claritin usually takes care of any allergic reaction. I've been through a couple other anti-histamines who's names I can't remember. So I'm careful to only take Claritin when I need it rather than risk daily exposure and up the chances of a reaction to the one anti histamine that currently works for me. This means I avoid like the plague anything I'm allergic to rather than just hope the pill fixes the problem for me. And that is part of the danger is relying on a pill, at least from my unique point of view.

I found out some more info on Benadryl and just wanted to post it for everyone who is interested. One web page you can go to is Benadryl FAQ web page --- <<CLICK HERE>> that might be able to help you with the various questions you have or another one I found is Benadryl Manufactured by Pfizer Canada --- <<CLICK HERE>>. I just saw my GI doctor yesterday and he told me that I might have something else also with the Celiac Disease that just happens to react to treatment from Benadryl - so it makes sense why in my case it has been helping me. But only when I have received it in my IV when hospitalized because it's 100% gluten free in shot form only. So now I will be giving myself shots of Benadryl at home when needed because my GI doctor said it would greatly benefit me. He said it's common for some people who were diagnosed with Celiac Disease to also be diagnosed with this other thing too (sorry I can't remember what the name of it is but will post it later). I copied and pasted some of the information from the second web page below.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the Benadryl helps, then sure take it, but do not go off the gluten free diet if you have celiac.

From my knowledge of Benadryl, the antihistimine in it does not affect the same "t" cells as found

in celiac disease.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


Another perspective. If you have celiac disease that does not prevent you from having other diseases/conditions that could be helped by Benadryl. Also, celiac is sometimes tricky to diagnose because it shares symtoms with other diseases to include some wheat allergies. Someone with a true wheat allergy would feel better on a gluten free diet and would see improvement with Benadryl.

At least one member of this site has reported having a clinical diagnosis of both celiac and a wheat allergy. That would mean that two different body subsystem are reacting against wheat they consume.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just wanted to quickly add that I do not advocate Benadryl as a cure for everyone who has Celiac Disease but just to present this information for those interested in looking into it further. This isn't a cure but just something that might help your symptoms. Talking it over with your GI doctor will help decide if this is the right course of treatment for you. Everyone is different and one thing that helps one person might not help another.

Benadryl is an antispasmodic, so it could be helping with the horrible cramping some of us were getting before our intestines started to heal. I took St John's Wort, cramp bark and ashwaghandha. They helped my bowel to relax and many times allowed trapped gas to pass. When our intestines are in that fragile state, it is good to do whatever it takes to relieve any pressure. I would think a person should be careful not to confuse the benefits of any antispasmodic with actual healing though. The relief from antispasmodics are only temporary and if gluten is still being consumed accidentally or otherwise, the damage to the gut will keep getting worse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On September 30, 2007 at 6:03 AM, lyndao said:

Long story made short. Can benadryl,taken by capsule be a way to lessen anxiety, rashes etc.

I have done so well on the gluten-free diet after being so sick for so long. WHY?

Maybe I don't have Celiac disease, but only a sensitivity to gluten or a possible deficiency omega fatty acids, and other vitamin deficiencies. I just don't know why I am doing so well on a gluten free diet.

Has anyone done any research into diphenhydramine hydrochloride? or Benadry and its effects on people managing psychiatric symptoms, such as anxiety, depression.

Just know I have not been truly diagnosed at this point with any gluten sensitivity, but why does this diet work so well for people like me who have neurological symptoms of numbing, tingling, rashes, joint pain.

Oh, I want to mention I have NOT been taking benadryl for a while and ONLY took a small dose last night after being itchy. I DO NOT advocate taking diphenhydramine BUT instead; direct to you a link I found at www.wikipedi.org and find an article by Bruce G. Charlton: http://www.hedweb.com/bgcharlton/sdtm.html) Medical Hypotheses.

I do NOT want to mislead but to guide, so people can make up their own minds.

I choose not to eat out at restaurants at the present time. This forum is to help you educate yourself. This forum is to help you be effective self-managers of your disease.

 

 

Lynda Lube

Celiac disease very commonly causes neurological symptoms, either from an immune reaction, an inflammatory reaction, or nutrient deficiency, all which are secondary to celiac. In addition, people with either celiac disease or gluten intolerance can develop something called a histamine intolerance. This is because damage the gut can damage the production of an enzyme called DOA, which is responsible for the breakdown of histamine in the gut. Since all foods have some degree of histamine in them (some more than others) then the gut and entire body can end up with an accumulation of histamine, which can cause all sorts of systemic issues, like sinus problems, migraines, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, insomnia, anxiety, etc. My guess is this is why people with celiac are likely to feel better on Benadryl, though he long term goal is healing the gut so the body can make DOA better! A classic example of someone with a histamine intolerance is someone with the appearance of many food "allergies" but all allergy tests are negative.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dr.A said:

Celiac disease very commonly causes neurological symptoms, either from an immune reaction, an inflammatory reaction, or nutrient deficiency, all which are secondary to celiac. In addition, people with either celiac disease or gluten intolerance can develop something called a histamine intolerance. This is because damage the gut can damage the production of an enzyme called DOA, which is responsible for the breakdown of histamine in the gut. Since all foods have some degree of histamine in them (some more than others) then the gut and entire body can end up with an accumulation of histamine, which can cause all sorts of systemic issues, like sinus problems, migraines, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, insomnia, anxiety, etc. My guess is this is why people with celiac are likely to feel better on Benadryl, though he long term goal is healing the gut so the body can make DOA better! A classic example of someone with a histamine intolerance is someone with the appearance of many food "allergies" but all allergy tests are negative.

Just a heads up - I don't think the original poster, or even any of the others have been active for many years.  This is from 2007.  I doubt they will see your answer.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
2 2

  • Who's Online   5 Members, 0 Anonymous, 1,048 Guests (See full list)

  • Top Posters +

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/16/2018 - Summer is the time for chips and salsa. This fresh salsa recipe relies on cabbage, yes, cabbage, as a secret ingredient. The cabbage brings a delicious flavor and helps the salsa hold together nicely for scooping with your favorite chips. The result is a fresh, tasty salsa that goes great with guacamole.
    Ingredients:
    3 cups ripe fresh tomatoes, diced 1 cup shredded green cabbage ½ cup diced yellow onion ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 jalapeno, seeded 1 Serrano pepper, seeded 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves, minced salt to taste black pepper, to taste Directions:
    Purée all ingredients together in a blender.
    Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. 
    Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, as desired. 
    Serve is a bowl with tortilla chips and guacamole.

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 06/15/2018 - There seems to be widespread agreement in the published medical research reports that stuttering is driven by abnormalities in the brain. Sometimes these are the result of brain injuries resulting from a stroke. Other types of brain injuries can also result in stuttering. Patients with Parkinson’s disease who were treated with stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, an area of the brain that regulates some motor functions, experienced a return or worsening of stuttering that improved when the stimulation was turned off (1). Similarly, stroke has also been reported in association with acquired stuttering (2). While there are some reports of psychological mechanisms underlying stuttering, a majority of reports seem to favor altered brain morphology and/or function as the root of stuttering (3). Reports of structural differences between the brain hemispheres that are absent in those who do not stutter are also common (4). About 5% of children stutter, beginning sometime around age 3, during the phase of speech acquisition. However, about 75% of these cases resolve without intervention, before reaching their teens (5). Some cases of aphasia, a loss of speech production or understanding, have been reported in association with damage or changes to one or more of the language centers of the brain (6). Stuttering may sometimes arise from changes or damage to these same language centers (7). Thus, many stutterers have abnormalities in the same regions of the brain similar to those seen in aphasia.
    So how, you may ask, is all this related to gluten? As a starting point, one report from the medical literature identifies a patient who developed aphasia after admission for severe diarrhea. By the time celiac disease was diagnosed, he had completely lost his faculty of speech. However, his speech and normal bowel function gradually returned after beginning a gluten free diet (8). This finding was so controversial at the time of publication (1988) that the authors chose to remain anonymous. Nonetheless, it is a valuable clue that suggests gluten as a factor in compromised speech production. At about the same time (late 1980’s) reports of connections between untreated celiac disease and seizures/epilepsy were emerging in the medical literature (9).
    With the advent of the Internet a whole new field of anecdotal information was emerging, connecting a variety of neurological symptoms to celiac disease. While many medical practitioners and researchers were casting aspersions on these assertions, a select few chose to explore such claims using scientific research designs and methods. While connections between stuttering and gluten consumption seem to have been overlooked by the medical research community, there is a rich literature on the Internet that cries out for more structured investigation of this connection. Conversely, perhaps a publication bias of the peer review process excludes work that explores this connection.
    Whatever the reason that stuttering has not been reported in the medical literature in association with gluten ingestion, a number of personal disclosures and comments suggesting a connection between gluten and stuttering can be found on the Internet. Abid Hussain, in an article about food allergy and stuttering said: “The most common food allergy prevalent in stutterers is that of gluten which has been found to aggravate the stutter” (10). Similarly, Craig Forsythe posted an article that includes five cases of self-reporting individuals who believe that their stuttering is or was connected to gluten, one of whom also experiences stuttering from foods containing yeast (11). The same site contains one report of a stutterer who has had no relief despite following a gluten free diet for 20 years (11). Another stutterer, Jay88, reports the complete disappearance of her/his stammer on a gluten free diet (12). Doubtless there are many more such anecdotes to be found on the Internet* but we have to question them, exercising more skepticism than we might when reading similar claims in a peer reviewed scientific or medical journal.
    There are many reports in such journals connecting brain and neurological ailments with gluten, so it is not much of a stretch, on that basis alone, to suspect that stuttering may be a symptom of the gluten syndrome. Rodney Ford has even characterized celiac disease as an ailment that may begin through gluten-induced neurological damage (13) and Marios Hadjivassiliou and his group of neurologists and neurological investigators have devoted considerable time and effort to research that reveals gluten as an important factor in a majority of neurological diseases of unknown origin (14) which, as I have pointed out previously, includes most neurological ailments.
    My own experience with stuttering is limited. I stuttered as a child when I became nervous, upset, or self-conscious. Although I have been gluten free for many years, I haven’t noticed any impact on my inclination to stutter when upset. I don’t know if they are related, but I have also had challenges with speaking when distressed and I have noticed a substantial improvement in this area since removing gluten from my diet. Nonetheless, I have long wondered if there is a connection between gluten consumption and stuttering. Having done the research for this article, I would now encourage stutterers to try a gluten free diet for six months to see if it will reduce or eliminate their stutter. Meanwhile, I hope that some investigator out there will research this matter, publish her findings, and start the ball rolling toward getting some definitive answers to this question.
    Sources:
    1. Toft M, Dietrichs E. Aggravated stuttering following subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease--two cases. BMC Neurol. 2011 Apr 8;11:44.
    2. Tani T, Sakai Y. Stuttering after right cerebellar infarction: a case study. J Fluency Disord. 2010 Jun;35(2):141-5. Epub 2010 Mar 15.
    3. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    4. Jäncke L, Hänggi J, Steinmetz H. Morphological brain differences between adult stutterers and non-stutterers. BMC Neurol. 2004 Dec 10;4(1):23.
    5. Kell CA, Neumann K, von Kriegstein K, Posenenske C, von Gudenberg AW, Euler H, Giraud AL. How the brain repairs stuttering. Brain. 2009 Oct;132(Pt 10):2747-60. Epub 2009 Aug 26.
    6. Galantucci S, Tartaglia MC, Wilson SM, Henry ML, Filippi M, Agosta F, Dronkers NF, Henry RG, Ogar JM, Miller BL, Gorno-Tempini ML. White matter damage in primary progressive aphasias: a diffusion tensor tractography study. Brain. 2011 Jun 11.
    7. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    8. [No authors listed] Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 43-1988. A 52-year-old man with persistent watery diarrhea and aphasia. N Engl J Med. 1988 Oct 27;319(17):1139-48
    9. Molteni N, Bardella MT, Baldassarri AR, Bianchi PA. Celiac disease associated with epilepsy and intracranial calcifications: report of two patients. Am J Gastroenterol. 1988 Sep;83(9):992-4.
    10. http://ezinearticles.com/?Food-Allergy-and-Stuttering-Link&id=1235725 
    11. http://www.craig.copperleife.com/health/stuttering_allergies.htm 
    12. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/73362-any-help-is-appreciated/
    13. Ford RP. The gluten syndrome: a neurological disease. Med Hypotheses. 2009 Sep;73(3):438-40. Epub 2009 Apr 29.
    14. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/14/2018 - Refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII) is a rare complication of celiac disease that has high death rates. To diagnose RCDII, doctors identify a clonal population of phenotypically aberrant intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). 
    However, researchers really don’t have much data regarding the frequency and significance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. Such data could provide useful comparison information for patients with RCDII, among other things.
    To that end, a research team recently set out to try to get some information about the frequency and importance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. The research team included Shafinaz Hussein, Tatyana Gindin, Stephen M Lagana, Carolina Arguelles-Grande, Suneeta Krishnareddy, Bachir Alobeid, Suzanne K Lewis, Mahesh M Mansukhani, Peter H R Green, and Govind Bhagat.
    They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, and the Department of Medicine at the Celiac Disease Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, USA. Their team analyzed results of TCR-GR analyses performed on SB biopsies at our institution over a 3-year period, which were obtained from eight active celiac disease, 172 celiac disease on gluten-free diet, 33 RCDI, and three RCDII patients and 14 patients without celiac disease. 
    Clonal TCR-GRs are not infrequent in cases lacking features of RCDII, while PCPs are frequent in all disease phases. TCR-GR results should be assessed in conjunction with immunophenotypic, histological and clinical findings for appropriate diagnosis and classification of RCD.
    The team divided the TCR-GR patterns into clonal, polyclonal and prominent clonal peaks (PCPs), and correlated these patterns with clinical and pathological features. In all, they detected clonal TCR-GR products in biopsies from 67% of patients with RCDII, 17% of patients with RCDI and 6% of patients with gluten-free diet. They found PCPs in all disease phases, but saw no significant difference in the TCR-GR patterns between the non-RCDII disease categories (p=0.39). 
    They also noted a higher frequency of surface CD3(−) IELs in cases with clonal TCR-GR, but the PCP pattern showed no associations with any clinical or pathological feature. 
    Repeat biopsy showed that the clonal or PCP pattern persisted for up to 2 years with no evidence of RCDII. The study indicates that better understanding of clonal T cell receptor gene rearrangements may help researchers improve refractory celiac diagnosis. 
    Source:
    Journal of Clinical Pathologyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jclinpath-2018-205023

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/13/2018 - There have been numerous reports that olmesartan, aka Benicar, seems to trigger sprue‐like enteropathy in many patients, but so far, studies have produced mixed results, and there really hasn’t been a rigorous study of the issue. A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether olmesartan is associated with a higher rate of enteropathy compared with other angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).
    The research team included Y.‐H. Dong; Y. Jin; TN Tsacogianis; M He; PH Hsieh; and JJ Gagne. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, USA; the Faculty of Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Science at National Yang‐Ming University in Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Hepato‐Gastroenterology, Chi Mei Medical Center in Tainan, Taiwan.
    To get solid data on the issue, the team conducted a cohort study among ARB initiators in 5 US claims databases covering numerous health insurers. They used Cox regression models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for enteropathy‐related outcomes, including celiac disease, malabsorption, concomitant diagnoses of diarrhea and weight loss, and non‐infectious enteropathy. In all, they found nearly two million eligible patients. 
    They then assessed those patients and compared the results for olmesartan initiators to initiators of other ARBs after propensity score (PS) matching. They found unadjusted incidence rates of 0.82, 1.41, 1.66 and 29.20 per 1,000 person‐years for celiac disease, malabsorption, concomitant diagnoses of diarrhea and weight loss, and non‐infectious enteropathy respectively. 
    After PS matching comparing olmesartan to other ARBs, hazard ratios were 1.21 (95% CI, 1.05‐1.40), 1.00 (95% CI, 0.88‐1.13), 1.22 (95% CI, 1.10‐1.36) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01‐1.07) for each outcome. Patients aged 65 years and older showed greater hazard ratios for celiac disease, as did patients receiving treatment for more than 1 year, and patients receiving higher cumulative olmesartan doses.
    This is the first comprehensive multi‐database study to document a higher rate of enteropathy in olmesartan initiators as compared to initiators of other ARBs, though absolute rates were low for both groups.
    Source:
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/12/2018 - A life-long gluten-free diet is the only proven treatment for celiac disease. However, current methods for assessing gluten-free diet compliance are lack the sensitivity to detect occasional dietary transgressions that may cause gut mucosal damage. So, basically, there’s currently no good way to tell if celiac patients are suffering gut damage from low-level gluten contamination.
    A team of researchers recently set out to develop a method to determine gluten intake and monitor gluten-free dietary compliance in patients with celiac disease, and to determine its correlation with mucosal damage. The research team included ML Moreno, Á Cebolla, A Muñoz-Suano, C Carrillo-Carrion, I Comino, Á Pizarro, F León, A Rodríguez-Herrera, and C Sousa. They are variously affiliated with Facultad de Farmacia, Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain; Biomedal S.L., Sevilla, Spain; Unidad Clínica de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, Spain; Celimmune, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; and the Unidad de Gastroenterología y Nutrición, Instituto Hispalense de Pediatría, Sevilla, Spain.
    For their study, the team collected urine samples from 76 healthy subjects and 58 patients with celiac disease subjected to different gluten dietary conditions. To quantify gluten immunogenic peptides in solid-phase extracted urines, the team used a lateral flow test (LFT) with the highly sensitive and specific G12 monoclonal antibody for the most dominant GIPs and an LFT reader. 
    They detected GIPs in concentrated urines from healthy individuals previously subjected to gluten-free diet as early as 4-6 h after single gluten intake, and for 1-2 days afterward. The urine test showed gluten ingestion in about 50% of patients. Biopsy analysis showed that nearly 9 out of 10 celiac patients with no villous atrophy had no detectable GIP in urine, while all patients with quantifiable GIP in urine showed signs of gut damage.
    The ability to use GIP in urine to reveal gluten consumption will likely help lead to new and non-invasive methods for monitoring gluten-free diet compliance. The test is sensitive, specific and simple enough for clinical monitoring of celiac patients, as well as for basic and clinical research applications including drug development.
    Source:
    Gut. 2017 Feb;66(2):250-257. &nbsp;doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2015-310148.