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horsegirl

Low Vitamin D Levels

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I recently asked my doctor to test my vitamin B12 and vitamin D levels since I'm "free" of several

different major food groups now. My B12 was in the "normal" range, but the D was quite low

("optimum functioning" is 35, & I was 18). The doctor recommended bumping up my intake to 1200 units daily. But how do I do that? Supplements? Certain foods?

Any suggestions?


Diagnosed Fibromyalgia & osteoarthritis in multiple joints 12/06

Diagnosed gluten intolerant through dietary trials 8/07

Enterolab positive for gluten, casein, soy, egg

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (Subtype 6,6)

Gluten free 8/10/07

Casein free 8/27/07

Soy & egg free 9/8/07

Eggs back again (whoo hoo!) 11/08

Diagnosed chronic fatigue syndrome 12/09

Starting various supplements/vitamins in hopes of feeling better!

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Mine was also just tested and found to be below optimal. They're having me take a vitamin D3 supplement with 50,000 IU of Vitamin D3...I'm taking one of those a day for a month...don't know what happens after that though, I need to ask tomorrow. She said the idea behind the megadose is to "flood the receptors" whatever that means. I don't think I could get that much with just food alone. You might call your doctor and ask about the best way to get it.

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I believe someone recently posted a link to an article about how D3 supplements are better than the usual D2 ones.

A number of foods are supplemented with D. I see my hemp milk has D2 and my orange juice has D3.

I wouldn't recommend taking more than what your doctor personally prescribes. You don't want to overdose.

Do you get much sunlight? This is the way humans have traditionally gotten their Vitamin D. Here's an article I recently read:

http://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2007nl/sep/vd.htm


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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Unless you live quite near the equator, you won't get enough vitamin D through sun in the winter, no matter how long you stay in the sun.

The best and healthiest source of vitamin D is still good old cod liver oil. And there is a good tasting one now that even tastes good, not fishy. I am taking Carlson cod liver oil, and went from 24 to 150 within a year, and had to cut back, as it was getting too high. Optimal is about 120.

Cod liver oil gives you also high doses of omega 3 fatty acids, which are essential to health, as well as vitamin A and E.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Unless you live quite near the equator, you won't get enough vitamin D through sun in the winter, no matter how long you stay in the sun.

The best and healthiest source of vitamin D is still good old cod liver oil. And there is a good tasting one now that even tastes good, not fishy. I am taking Carlson cod liver oil, and went from 24 to 150 within a year, and had to cut back, as it was getting too high. Optimal is about 120.

Cod liver oil gives you also high doses of omega 3 fatty acids, which are essential to health, as well as vitamin A and E.

I'm with Ursula...it's cheap, too!


Emily

diagnosed type one diabetic 1973

diagnosed celiac winter 2005

diagnosed hypothyroid spring 2006

But healthy and happy! 253.gif

11 year-old Son had negative blood panel, but went on gluten-free diet of his own volition to see if his concentration would improve, his temper abate, and his energy level would increase. Miraculous response!

The great are great only because we are on our knees.

--Pierre Joseph Proudhon (1809-1865)

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I'm with Ursula...it's cheap, too!

Oh yeah, that! I forgot about the whole winter thing...

I got glutened this past weekend, my IQ still hasn't recovered. I take Dr Ron's cod liver oil, but it's pretty expensive, Carlson is the next best. And you said it doesn't taste bad?


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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I've tried taking a few different brands of EFAs (essential fatty acids) and fish oils and haven't tolerated any of them (also tried Flax seed oil and meal and hemp for some Omega 3s with no luck in the tolerance department)...I'm wondering if the cod liver would do any better for me? :unsure: Just thinking in cyberspace. :P

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I got glutened this past weekend, my IQ still hasn't recovered. I take Dr Ron's cod liver oil, but it's pretty expensive, Carlson is the next best. And you said it doesn't taste bad?

Carlson cod liver oil is lemon flavoured, and really doesn't taste bad. My husband claims it tastes great, I wouldn't go that far myself. But I am one of those people who will absolutely not take anything that tastes bad (I just can't make myself stick with something I hate). So, if I've taken it for two years now, you better believe it tastes okay!


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Before I found out I was intensely intolerant of dairy, I enjoyed adding a tablespoon of Carlson's lemon cod liver oil to 8 oz. of plain yogurt, along with a packet of Stevia Plus (or some other acceptable sweetener). It tasted like a wonderful lemon pudding! Honestly. It may sound bad, but it's actually really good! I miss it.

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