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hidngplace

Adding Gluten

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I know this is a weird topic for a celiac board but figured there might be others in the same situation.

My sister in law referred me to this board, my niece has celiac disease.

My youngest daughter (4) has autism and like many other autistic kids we are trying gluten-free diet. (later to add or try cf diet)

Has anyone gotten all the gluten-free flours and made or bought an all purpose flour and separately bought gluten to add to it? I have 3 teenage girls that love to cook. I was hoping if I had all gluten flours it would be a little "safer", then I would only have to worry about the gluten. Does the consistency become a little more "normal" consistency? We made bread for my youngest daughter... the flavor was good and I like it while hot, but very different texture once it cools down. So I am assuming using all gluten-free flour would change cookies, cakes etc... which my teens won't like.

Though I will be browsing on here a lot trying to find recipes we all enjoy to take more and more gluten out of our diets. Figure it would probably be healthier anyway.

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BAking gluten free is generally healthier for you, although has more calories. As far as I know, adding gluten to gluten-free flours doesn't have much effect, but none of us would know becuase we don't use gluten, although there may be a baker on here with gluteny families. Just remember to keep your gluten pans and gluten free pans and (utensils) separate!

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I haven't had a lot of luck with gluten free baking and for the most part simply buy the gluten free stuff made up. I do keep a four flour gluten-free mix, sweet rice flour, sticky rice flour, plain rice flour and a few other things like cornmeal.

I used to do a lot of baking, but now that I have diabetes and my husband is on a perpetual diet, I pretty much quit all the baking. I threw out all of my gluten stuff and now if my husband wants cookies, or I want bread, I just buy it ready made.

You might find it is easier to buy all of one or the other already made up. However, if you choose to use gluten containing things, you are always risking cross contamination.

From my perspective, it makes no sense to add gluten to gluten-free flours. As you pointed out, they have a different consistancy and taste and while I'm no expert, I don't think adding gluten to them is going to change that. Plus they are more expensive.

If you do a lot of baking, you might choose to just bake with gluten and buy the gluten-free things for the one person who needs to eat gluten-free. That might work out cheaper in the long run. You could then keep some sweet rice flour in the house for thickening gravies so you could all eat the same dish.

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I'm not sure how cross contamination figures into a gluten free diet for someone with autism, but cc is a major issue for celiacs. Wheat or gluten flour flying about the kitchen (Ok, more like floating, but it does poof up and go everywhere) can pose a cc risk for everything else you do.

That being said, I bake gluten-free for my daughter. I have done bread, cookies, cakes, muffins, and brownies. You are absolutely right about the bread and I have found it to be the hardest item to replace. However, my cakes and cookies (and the other sweet stuff) have turned out just fine. The batter/dough may handle a little differently but the end result is good. I've taken my cookies to a pitch-in and they were scarfed. You may want to try out a few sweets, I think you'll have better luck.

Two comments: The shelf life isn't as long for the gluten free stuff so you need to eat it (within a few days) or freeze it. Second, get your white rice flour from an asian market. It's cheaper and a finer ground - you'll notice the difference in something like a cake.

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Thanks... I guess I will just have to play. I have to watch CC especially at first. I have talked to two different mothers that have gone gluten-free and something as small as one cheerio would cause their children to not talk for 4-5 days.

I have thought about taking all my flour that isn't gluten-free and getting rid of it for now. I have to know it is 100% gluten-free to see if it makes a difference, she has no concept of what I am doing so I can't count on her to ask before she eats.

I was worried about cc in Asian flours.

Thanks again... I think I will buy their bread for now and go gluten-free in all baking. The sugary goods taste good and the girls will adjust.

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I bake a lot, with very good results (maybe good luck, too).

I use Gluten-Free Baking Classics, by Annalise Roberts. The breads are so good, my gluten-eating family scarfs it down and I have to fight for a piece! The author has a website: www.foodphilosopher.com. CLick on "gluten-free archives."

The recipes are made in the oven, though, not the bread machine. THere is also a fantastic bread recipe floating around the board here--do a search for "Lorka Bread." I think that one can go in the bread machine.

For oven breads, I have best results from a glass bread pan or from a French bread pan.

Happy baking!

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I am delving into gluten-free baking, because I think it just tastes better. There is a thread on here about the best homemade bread ever and it really is good.

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?s...p;hl=best+bread

I have modified the recipe some. I use Coconut flour instead of rice flour, Sorgham instead of bean flour and you almost have to double the liquid because of the fiber in the coconut. It can be made dairy free-I use Hemp milk instead of regular milk.

Everytime I make it, I know I can count on my husband eating half the loaf before it cools and he can eat gluten.

The textures and stuff really are better if you make your own. I will say that this forum has the most talented and skilled bakers ever. If you need a substitute or recipe idea, I promise there is always someone who can help.

I have been gluten free since Jan. One of my co-workers has a 7 yr that is high functioning autism and a 9 yr. with Asperger's. She took them gluten free about a month ago and the difference is amazing! the 7 yr gave her kisses-voluntarily. and will initiate conversations sometimes. (rather than look at the floor and answer yes/no)

Good luck to you!

Kat.

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