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just_curious

A Question

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Hello everyone,

I have read that celiac and gluten intolerance often goes undiagnosed, and often one's intestines are being damaged without even knowing it. My question: will the intolerance always eventually manifest itself with physical symptoms, and if not, why does it matter that a person like that should change their diet? (also, how would they know in the first place to get tested?)

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Hello everyone,

I have read that celiac and gluten intolerance often goes undiagnosed, and often one's intestines are being damaged without even knowing it. My question: will the intolerance always eventually manifest itself with physical symptoms, and if not, why does it matter that a person like that should change their diet? (also, how would they know in the first place to get tested?)

Welcome!

Yes, it takes an average of 11 years to diagnose Celiac Disease. Celiac can be non-symptomatic although it will continue to cause damage and it is often discovered through thyroid, adrenal and other abnormalities.

Celiac is a disease that effects the small intestines. The autoimmune response to gluten can attack other vital organs as well.

If one is diagnosed with Celiac Disease or a Gluten Intolerance, the prescription is the same symptomatic or not - total gluten free diet.

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I can answer this. I received an email from RnteroLab kust yesterday and this is what it said in part;

The IgA blood test that came out positive confirmed that you are sensitive to the gluten protein therefore, you should permanently remove gluten from your diet. The IgG test that was negative was to confirm an allergy not a sensitivity. There is a big difference between the two. If you are allergic to a food your body will produce the IgG or the IgE antibody and the symptoms are usually short lived. It is also possible to build up a tolerance to these foods over time and eventually reintroduce them into your diet. This is not possible with a food sensitivity. If you are sensitive to a food protein, your body does not have nor will it ever have the capability of breaking down and digesting the protein. This causes your immune system to begin producing the IgA antibody at above normal levels, thereby giving you a positive blood test. Once this process begins, the only way to stop it is to permanently remove the food from your diet. If you do not this can begin a "domino effect" of other health issues you could develope as a direct result of gluten sensitivity

This really made sense to me and I hope it helps you too.

Joss

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Hello everyone,

I have read that celiac and gluten intolerance often goes undiagnosed, and often one's intestines are being damaged without even knowing it. My question: will the intolerance always eventually manifest itself with physical symptoms, and if not, why does it matter that a person like that should change their diet? (also, how would they know in the first place to get tested?)

For most the reason to test is because of symptoms that may or may not be tummy related. The folks who are asymptomatic, no symptoms at all are often found when another member of the family is diagnosed and the doctor encourages the rest of the family to be tested. Celiac and gluten intolerance can affect many of the bodies systems before the usual 'celiac' symptoms develop. Some folks may have neurological issues like depression or anxiety or difficulty with movement and balance, some may have skin issues, some may have just heartburn but no constipation or diarrhea. Some may have arthritis of various forms. When you have a reaction to gluten it can cause many autoimmune disorders that you might not think are gluten related. It can also effect the ability to concieve and carry a child to term. Most of all it can cause cancers and things like kidney problems, gallbladder.... well you get the idea. The ideal is to get diagnosed before all the resulting damage can occur as going gluten free will greatly decrease if not eliminate the formation of more serious problems.

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