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twinpikes

5 Yr Old With Normal Sed Rate, Hematocrit But Hypothyroid Please Help

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Hi,

I am new here and wondered if anyone could help with some questions while i wait for the celiac specific blood work results on my 5 yr old daughter. She has hypothyroidism and has had explosive floaty stools and abdominal bloating with cramping for 5 weeks. Her stool chem profile, hematocrit and sed rate were all normal...still waiting for antibody tests and it will be a long weekend!!! Could she still have celiac without and elevated sed rate and normal RBC....could it be that it was caught early and malabsorption has not occured yet????? Thanks for any help.

A Worried Mom

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Yes, she could still have Celiac. Hope you find out soon and try not to worry!

Thank you......over the summer she got diagnosed with hashimoto's...thanks to Mom. Now all these GI symptoms...my poor girl.

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Guest Doll

Aw, poor thing! But this is life! If she has Celiac, it's not the end of the world, although I *DO* understand if you are feeling guilty or overwhelmed. 100% normal. The gluten-free diet is not all the hard to follow, and she should see improvement right away. I felt better the first day I went gluten-free. Within 3 days, I felt MUCH better. Since she is young, she should heal very fast. If you have Hashi's, it would be interesting to see if you test positive as well. Some people are asymptomatic.

Also know that Hashi's, Celiac Disease, and Type 1 diabetes often run together ("cluster"). I know from experience. ;) On a serious note, you may want to be aware that she *may* be high risk to develop Type 1 diabetes.

There is no known way to prevent it yet (Type 1 diabetes has *NOTHING* to do with poor diet, junk food, lack of exercise, etc.), but you can be aware to watch out for symptoms. Some people say being gluten-free and decreases the risk, but a good number of studies have shown this is not the case. Jury is out. Casein has been linked with Type 1 diabetes in some studies. It can't hurt to go casein free as well.

Don't want to worry you though, I just want you to know as much as you can. Knowledge is power, and the more you know, the healthier and happier your daughter will be.

There are *tons* of great recipes for young kids on this board. You are doing the right thing looking for information, and I know your daughter is in good hands. She will be fine, no matter what life throws you!

Just keep on top of her health while allowing her to be a normal kid, and she will be fine! :)

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Hi and welcome. Yes she could still be celiac....

My daughter was diagnosed at age 4yrs and is doing well - thyroid wise

Of all the things we deal with between the kids - hypothyroid was the easiest!

The hardest part for me, was they didnt diagnose it til she was quite sick from it - she was sleeping all the time , constipated, stopped growing. I kept bringing her back in and it wasnt til she dropped below zero on the growth chart and developed myxedema that they suddenly made a STAT referral. Her TSH was over 900 and T4 was 5.2....she held the record for highest TSH until a baby was presented that was born without a thyroid.

Even being so low for so long - she caught up in terms of growth - back up to 50 percentile and hasnt looked back.

She was diagnosed celiac later and is doing awesome on the gluten-free diet.

Keep us posted

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Aw, poor thing! But this is life! If she has Celiac, it's not the end of the world, although I *DO* understand if you are feeling guilty or overwhelmed. 100% normal. The gluten-free diet is not all the hard to follow, and she should see improvement right away. I felt better the first day I went gluten-free. Within 3 days, I felt MUCH better. Since she is young, she should heal very fast. If you have Hashi's, it would be interesting to see if you test positive as well. Some people are asymptomatic.

Also know that Hashi's, Celiac Disease, and Type 1 diabetes often run together ("cluster"). I know from experience. ;) On a serious note, you may want to be aware that she *may* be high risk to develop Type 1 diabetes.

There is no known way to prevent it yet (Type 1 diabetes has *NOTHING* to do with poor diet, junk food, lack of exercise, etc.), but you can be aware to watch out for symptoms. Some people say being gluten-free and decreases the risk, but a good number of studies have shown this is not the case. Jury is out. Casein has been linked with Type 1 diabetes in some studies. It can't hurt to go casein free as well.

Don't want to worry you though, I just want you to know as much as you can. Knowledge is power, and the more you know, the healthier and happier your daughter will be.

There are *tons* of great recipes for young kids on this board. You are doing the right thing looking for information, and I know your daughter is in good hands. She will be fine, no matter what life throws you!

Just keep on top of her health while allowing her to be a normal kid, and she will be fine! :)

Woderfully said!!

I have been hypo for 13 yrs and haven't stopped promoting thyroid disease awareness.

She was exihibiting symptoms first and then i saw the goitre and presented it to her pediatrician; she never got very high with her TSH but it was evident that something was wrong, so we tested her antibodies and they were high. What gets me angry is when her first endo said that her symptoms can't be related to thyroid disease....oh my! Is he still in the dark ages or what?Now that we have knowledge at our fingertips with the internet and with all the nasty autoimmune diseases out there we need to keep educating ourselves about our bodies and take control of our health care.

It sounds like you have been through a ton of stuff yourself and are well educated and it's wonderful that you are here helping others who are new to celiac. Why have i missed this disease with myself??? (I am already assuming i have it, I shouldn't do that). I have had bowel issues for a very long time. I have already set up an appointment for tests!!!

My daughter's doc wants us to start a lactose free diet while we wait for results of celiac....Do you think that is necessary? Or should i just try to go gluten free? I have been told it is expensive and I am very far from a whole food market.

Thanks again!!!!!!!

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Hi and welcome. Yes she could still be celiac....

My daughter was diagnosed at age 4yrs and is doing well - thyroid wise

Of all the things we deal with between the kids - hypothyroid was the easiest!

The hardest part for me, was they didnt diagnose it til she was quite sick from it - she was sleeping all the time , constipated, stopped growing. I kept bringing her back in and it wasnt til she dropped below zero on the growth chart and developed myxedema that they suddenly made a STAT referral. Her TSH was over 900 and T4 was 5.2....she held the record for highest TSH until a baby was presented that was born without a thyroid.

Even being so low for so long - she caught up in terms of growth - back up to 50 percentile and hasnt looked back.

She was diagnosed celiac later and is doing awesome on the gluten-free diet.

Keep us posted

Oh my! 900.....I can't imagine how she felt...I have never heard of such a high TSH before...lots of hugs to her and you! It must have taken a long time to get her regulated! My daughter began meds in July and became over-medicated and she is just now regulating. Did it take yrs for your daughter to get down in the 1 or 2 range for her TSH?

Thank you very much for sharing your story.

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Oh my! 900.....I can't imagine how she felt...I have never heard of such a high TSH before...lots of hugs to her and you! It must have taken a long time to get her regulated! My daughter began meds in July and became over-medicated and she is just now regulating. Did it take yrs for your daughter to get down in the 1 or 2 range for her TSH?

Thank you very much for sharing your story.

The endocrinologist who saw her for the initial consult has us take pictures at home on the day she was diagnosed and then 3 days later. She uses those pics in lectures about thyroid failure in children. We live an hour and half from the hospital where she was seen, and I guess, based on the clinical picture, this doc ordered a STAT thyroid screen and by the time I got home, there was a message on my machine saying - CALL US, they already phoned the script into our lcoal drugstore and the pharmacist was willing to deliver after hours ....that's how urgent she was.... what has always annoyed me.. is that I brought her in to the pediatrician 3 times that year and was dismissed as overanxious about growth charts..

They had her on a starting dose (they started low because she was so profoundly hypothyroid, they didnt want to reverse it too quick - apparently a bit of shock for the system). They checked her levels every 6 weeks...increased the dose after first check ...She was stable after 12 weeks...then she was tested every 3 months during her first year ( as in blood work, doc visit, growth measurement) to make sure she was growing again.

The myxedema disappeared after 3 days - she peed and peed! It ws only 12 weeks and her TSH was down to 1.22 and T4 was 18...for Kathryn - her T4 is best at levels 18 - 20 (at least by the lab values from our lab).

Her dose changed about every 6 month to a year til she was about 8, then she was on the same dose for 2 years til she went through growth phase. She is almost 15 now and has been on the same dose since 2004. Interestingly enough -after she was diagnosed celiac - what we saw in hindsight, was that her lab results were indicating a need for more synthroid for about a year prior ..then once she went gluten-free, she became a little hyper --- TSH was 0.1 and T4 was 30 -...we lowered her back down.

The damaged intestine was not absorbing meds the way it should ..so when they healed...it was way too much

If you are celiac but not disgnosed and the intestine is damaged - the thyroid meds will not be absorbed properly and will lead to erratic results. The erratic results will be attributed to: a need to adjust meds, growth spurts, hormones...at least that is what the docs first think ..

and a little note for wee ones with thyroid issues... I only know this about synthroid, not other brands...but Kathryn has chewed them since day one. She was too little to figure our swallowing a pill... there has been no issues with this way of getting my daughter to take the meds.

Sandy

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The endocrinologist who saw her for the initial consult has us take pictures at home on the day she was diagnosed and then 3 days later. She uses those pics in lectures about thyroid failure in children. We live an hour and half from the hospital where she was seen, and I guess, based on the clinical picture, this doc ordered a STAT thyroid screen and by the time I got home, there was a message on my machine saying - CALL US, they already phoned the script into our lcoal drugstore and the pharmacist was willing to deliver after hours ....that's how urgent she was.... what has always annoyed me.. is that I brought her in to the pediatrician 3 times that year and was dismissed as overanxious about growth charts..

They had her on a starting dose (they started low because she was so profoundly hypothyroid, they didnt want to reverse it too quick - apparently a bit of shock for the system). They checked her levels every 6 weeks...increased the dose after first check ...She was stable after 12 weeks...then she was tested every 3 months during her first year ( as in blood work, doc visit, growth measurement) to make sure she was growing again.

The myxedema disappeared after 3 days - she peed and peed! It ws only 12 weeks and her TSH was down to 1.22 and T4 was 18...for Kathryn - her T4 is best at levels 18 - 20 (at least by the lab values from our lab).

Her dose changed about every 6 month to a year til she was about 8, then she was on the same dose for 2 years til she went through growth phase. She is almost 15 now and has been on the same dose since 2004. Interestingly enough -after she was diagnosed celiac - what we saw in hindsight, was that her lab results were indicating a need for more synthroid for about a year prior ..then once she went gluten-free, she became a little hyper --- TSH was 0.1 and T4 was 30 -...we lowered her back down.

The damaged intestine was not absorbing meds the way it should ..so when they healed...it was way too much

If you are celiac but not disgnosed and the intestine is damaged - the thyroid meds will not be absorbed properly and will lead to erratic results. The erratic results will be attributed to: a need to adjust meds, growth spurts, hormones...at least that is what the docs first think ..

and a little note for wee ones with thyroid issues... I only know this about synthroid, not other brands...but Kathryn has chewed them since day one. She was too little to figure our swallowing a pill... there has been no issues with this way of getting my daughter to take the meds.

Sandy

Oh, I can't tell you how i feel for you and your daughter....what a rollercoaster.

We all know that our environment takes most of the blame for all these autoimmune diseases.......I just wish we could narrow it down to a few triggers and find a way to detect them earlier and possibly stop the immune response before too much damage is done. The pill we take every day gives us an opportunity to live somewhat normal but there are so many other things that effect the absorption of the little synthetic pill, like you said, hormones, vitamins, time of day you take it and with what, or when it's time to have a baby and you discover you have infertility issues...it is a huge balancing act and that pill can't replace the real thing!

How is she doing through puberty with all the extra estrogen?

Thank you for that info about the absorption, it makes perfect sense.

My daughter is a twin and i worry about what disease her sister may develop....I don't mean to sound like it will happen but I must remain observant.

If my daughter has positive antibodies how do they do the biopsy?

My heart goes out to you.....I mean that with sincerity.

Michelle

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Guest Doll

There is no harm in going lactose free. Many doctors "trial" this to see if maybe a person has lactose intolerance instead of Celiac. But from looking at her clinical picture and medical history, I would assume Celiac before I assumed lactose intolerance. However, it is a doctor thing. ;) They have to rule out the "most common" diagnosis first. They are hoping that in the event that the results come back negative, the lactose free diet would have helped and they would have a dx.

As for going gluten free, if you want a biopsy for a "gold standard" dx, then NO, do not stop gluten. However, if you are planning to try the diet regardless of the blood test results, feel free to start now. There are pros and cons to both. In the vast majority of cases, I do support the biopsy, but you as the parent will have to decide what is best for you and your daughter. In Canada, dx'd Celiacs can claim their gluten-free food on their taxes. In the US, you can claim the difference between gluten-free and non-gluten-free foods. This may or may not help you, you will have to work this out depending on your income.

Overall, it is a common myth given by the medical profession that the gluten-free diet is hard to follow or expensive. 20 years ago, when gluten-free flours were hard to come by, this may have been the case. However, you can now buy rice flour and potato flour at the local Safeway for a good price. Some even have reasonably priced gluten-free mixes for buns, etc. Usually the "newer" stores with the health food sections have gluten-free items (at least in Canada). Baking your own gluten-free bread will save lots of money, although it will take time to get the results right. But don't give up!

In addition, think about all the foods that are *naturally* gluten-free. Fruits, fish, meats, veggies, rice, beans, nuts, many canned items, etc. You do not have to buy special food to eat gluten-free the majority of the time. People often make the mistake of spending $300 on gluten-free cookies, pies, frozen foods, pizzas, bagels, donuts, etc. after they are diagnosed. This food is not healthy or needed. If you buy gluten-free treats once in awhile, the gluten-free diet is actually not that much different from a healthy diet. And not necessarily that much more expensive. Splurge on gluten-free pasta (Tinkyada is great!) and one or two items, that is all that is needed. Save cookies, etc. for treats. Your daughter will be healthier in the long run anyway!

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How is she doing through puberty with all the extra estrogen?

Thank you for that info about the absorption, it makes perfect sense.

My daughter is a twin and i worry about what disease her sister may develop....I don't mean to sound like it will happen but I must remain observant.

If my daughter has positive antibodies how do they do the biopsy?

My heart goes out to you.....I mean that with sincerity.

Michelle

Thank you for your kind thoughts... the extra estrogen isnt interfering with her levels quite yet..she is in the early stages of menarche and hasnt had "real period"...just occasional spotting every few months. Endocrinologist is watching this..

If your daughter has positive antibodies , I would encourage you to just start gluten free based on that.... a child just diagnosed hypothyroid should not go under anesthesia [iMHO]. Endcoscopic biopsies - they put a tube down her throat with a camera and biopsy instrument and take small biopsies of different parts of the area, it needs a general anesthetic for small children.

A child who does not have normal levels of T4 will have slower recovery form anesthesia and it would be unwise. Kathryn has had anesthesia twice since being diagnosed hypothyroid, the anesthesiologist asked that her levels were checked prior to one and the other was emergency appendectomy, so no choice even if levels werent right. Both times she did fine with anesthesia / both times her thyroid levels and TSH were normal.

Sandy

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There is no harm in going lactose free. Many doctors "trial" this to see if maybe a person has lactose intolerance instead of Celiac. But from looking at her clinical picture and medical history, I would assume Celiac before I assumed lactose intolerance. However, it is a doctor thing. ;) They have to rule out the "most common" diagnosis first. They are hoping that in the event that the results come back negative, the lactose free diet would have helped and they would have a dx.

As for going gluten free, if you want a biopsy for a "gold standard" dx, then NO, do not stop gluten. However, if you are planning to try the diet regardless of the blood test results, feel free to start now. There are pros and cons to both. In the vast majority of cases, I do support the biopsy, but you as the parent will have to decide what is best for you and your daughter. In Canada, dx'd Celiacs can claim their gluten-free food on their taxes. In the US, you can claim the difference between gluten-free and non-gluten-free foods. This may or may not help you, you will have to work this out depending on your income.

Overall, it is a common myth given by the medical profession that the gluten-free diet is hard to follow or expensive. 20 years ago, when gluten-free flours were hard to come by, this may have been the case. However, you can now buy rice flour and potato flour at the local Safeway for a good price. Some even have reasonably priced gluten-free mixes for buns, etc. Usually the "newer" stores with the health food sections have gluten-free items (at least in Canada). Baking your own gluten-free bread will save lots of money, although it will take time to get the results right. But don't give up!

In addition, think about all the foods that are *naturally* gluten-free. Fruits, fish, meats, veggies, rice, beans, nuts, many canned items, etc. You do not have to buy special food to eat gluten-free the majority of the time. People often make the mistake of spending $300 on gluten-free cookies, pies, frozen foods, pizzas, bagels, donuts, etc. after they are diagnosed. This food is not healthy or needed. If you buy gluten-free treats once in awhile, the gluten-free diet is actually not that much different from a healthy diet. And not necessarily that much more expensive. Splurge on gluten-free pasta (Tinkyada is great!) and one or two items, that is all that is needed. Save cookies, etc. for treats. Your daughter will be healthier in the long run anyway!

If it is not celiac then what else could it be?

Negative on the parasites.

Could it be just lactose intolerance given her medical history?

Crohn's? IBS, colitis????

Thanks for your time....you have been so helpful.

Michelle

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Thank you for your kind thoughts... the extra estrogen isnt interfering with her levels quite yet..she is in the early stages of menarche and hasnt had "real period"...just occasional spotting every few months. Endocrinologist is watching this..

If your daughter has positive antibodies , I would encourage you to just start gluten free based on that.... a child just diagnosed hypothyroid should not go under anesthesia [iMHO]. Endcoscopic biopsies - they put a tube down her throat with a camera and biopsy instrument and take small biopsies of different parts of the area, it needs a general anesthetic for small children.

A child who does not have normal levels of T4 will have slower recovery form anesthesia and it would be unwise. Kathryn has had anesthesia twice since being diagnosed hypothyroid, the anesthesiologist asked that her levels were checked prior to one and the other was emergency appendectomy, so no choice even if levels werent right. Both times she did fine with anesthesia / both times her thyroid levels and TSH were normal.

Sandy

If my daughter's thyroid levels are regulated after this most recent test would it be safe to do the biopsy?

What are the reference ranges that your lab uses for TSH, Free T4 and Total T3....just curious.

Thank you for your time.

Michelle

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If my daughter's thyroid levels are regulated after this most recent test would it be safe to do the biopsy?

What are the reference ranges that your lab uses for TSH, Free T4 and Total T3....just curious.

Thank you for your time.

Michelle

Yes if thyroid levels are in range - it would be safe.

reference range for pediatric ( this lab)

Free T3 3.8-6.7 pmol

T3 total 1.4 -3.3 nmol

Free T4 12 -22 pmol

TSH 0.2 - 6 mUL

What we have found through time with Kathryn is she does best when TSH is around 2 -3 and T4 is 18 -20. With this in mind, the endo does not wait for the TSH to get to 6. Managing an adolescent is a little more finicky than an adult.

I hope I have helped :)

sandy

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Guest Doll
If it is not celiac then what else could it be?

Negative on the parasites.

Could it be just lactose intolerance given her medical history?

Crohn's? IBS, colitis????

Thanks for your time....you have been so helpful.

Michelle

Hi Michelle,

It *could* be just lactose intolerance, but I suspect there is more going on. Has she responded at all to a lactose free diet?

There are other causes that your doctor will likely rule out if the Celiac pannel and/or biopsy is negative. They should check for bowel infections and other GI disorders like colitis that you mentioned. Food allergies is another option they might want to explore depending on her overall symptoms. Does she have any other symptoms that you haven't mentioned yet?

Also, there seems to be a subgoup of people with autoimmune diseases that outwardly react to gluten but do not have the intestinal damage seen in Celiac. Often these people have abnormal bloodwork but a negative biopsy. It's not clear if they will develop intestinal damage or not. Some may, some may not. Regardless, they should be gluten-free. They are often labelled "gluten intolerant".

People with autoimmune diseases are thought to have "leaky guts" which let in the triggers for those diseases. Some of these people go on to react to gluten because of this leaky gut, but they may not have the additional genes needed to develop Celiac Disease. Still others do have the genes and perhaps even antibodies, but the full blown disease (intestinal damage when exposed to gluten) has not been triggered yet for unknown reasons. Your daughter *likely* would fall into this category if her bloodwork was slightly off, or if she had a positive blood test and negative biopsy. In this case, I feel she should be gluten-free. Celiac Disease, like all autoimmune diseases, it a complicated disorder with apprently an initial and secondary trigger (i.e. exposure to a virus and THEN you react to gluten) and multiple genes needed as well.

Just out of curiousity, did your daughter have any kind of short course viral infection or illness (i.e. with a fever) just before her symptoms started? I guess it's kind of hard to tell...but I thought I'd ask! :P

There are other cases of non-Celiac gluten intolerance, and these people tend to have negative biopsies and bloodwork. No one knows why the react to gluten, but they are likely not prone to autoimmune diseases from consuming it or at risk for going on to develop Celiac Disease. Gluten intolerance induced by Lyme Disease or Heavy Metal Toxicity is a good example of the above. If the underlying problem is corrected, they may be able to consume gluten again. This is NOT Celiac Disease. In either case, not enough is known about non-Celiac gluten intolerance, so I am assuming based on what I *do* know.

The key to all of this is finding out her results...so keep us posted! :)

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Yes if thyroid levels are in range - it would be safe.

reference range for pediatric ( this lab)

Free T3 3.8-6.7 pmol

T3 total 1.4 -3.3 nmol

Free T4 12 -22 pmol

TSH 0.2 - 6 mUL

What we have found throught ime with Kathryn is she does best when TSH is around 2 -3 and T4 is 18 -20. With this in mind, the endo does not wait for the TSJ to get to 6. Managing an adolescent is a little more finicky than an adult.

I hope I have helped :)

sandy

Thank you Sandy, you have been very helpful!

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Yes if thyroid levels are in range - it would be safe.

reference range for pediatric ( this lab)

Free T3 3.8-6.7 pmol

T3 total 1.4 -3.3 nmol

Free T4 12 -22 pmol

TSH 0.2 - 6 mUL

What we have found throught ime with Kathryn is she does best when TSH is around 2 -3 and T4 is 18 -20. With this in mind, the endo does not wait for the TSJ to get to 6. Managing an adolescent is a little more finicky than an adult.

I hope I have helped :)

sandy

This may be a double post but i want to make sure I thank you......you have helped so much! I will let you know when her results come back.

Michelle

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Hi Michelle,

It *could* be just lactose intolerance, but I suspect there is more going on. Has she responded at all to a lactose free diet?

There are other causes that your doctor will likely rule out if the Celiac pannel and/or biopsy is negative. They should check for bowel infections and other GI disorders like colitis that you mentioned. Food allergies is another option they might want to explore depending on her overall symptoms. Does she have any other symptoms that you haven't mentioned yet?

Also, there seems to be a subgoup of people with autoimmune diseases that outwardly react to gluten but do not have the intestinal damage seen in Celiac. Often these people have abnormal bloodwork but a negative biopsy. It's not clear if they will develop intestinal damage or not. Some may, some may not. Regardless, they should be gluten-free. They are often labelled "gluten intolerant".

People with autoimmune diseases are thought to have "leaky guts" which let in the triggers for those diseases. Some of these people go on to react to gluten because of this leaky gut, but they may not have the additional genes needed to develop Celiac Disease. Still others do have the genes and perhaps even antibodies, but the full blown disease (intestinal damage when exposed to gluten) has not been triggered yet for unknown reasons. Your daughter *likely* would fall into this category if her bloodwork was slightly off, or if she had a positive blood test and negative biopsy. In this case, I feel she should be gluten-free. Celiac Disease, like all autoimmune diseases, it a complicated disorder with apprently an initial and secondary trigger (i.e. exposure to a virus and THEN you react to gluten) and multiple genes needed as well.

Just out of curiousity, did your daughter have any kind of short course viral infection or illness (i.e. with a fever) just before her symptoms started? I guess it's kind of hard to tell...but I thought I'd ask! :P

There are other cases of non-Celiac gluten intolerance, and these people tend to have negative biopsies and bloodwork. No one knows why the react to gluten, but they are likely not prone to autoimmune diseases from consuming it or at risk for going on to develop Celiac Disease. Gluten intolerance induced by Lyme Disease or Heavy Metal Toxicity is a good example of the above. If the underlying problem is corrected, they may be able to consume gluten again. This is NOT Celiac Disease. In either case, not enough is known about non-Celiac gluten intolerance, so I am assuming based on what I *do* know.

The key to all of this is finding out her results...so keep us posted! :)

Hello,

We are still waiting for her results!! I just started her on a lactose free diet yesterday; i was hesitant because we are still trying to diagnose her and i didn't want anything to inhibit the diagnosis. She had 3 explosive poops in 1 hour yesterday and i am getting pretty sick and tired of watching my girl go through this. She looked up at me and said "I want this to go away MaMa" I could have cried. I almost want it to be positive for celiac so we can move on to heal her......I don't want to have to go through more appointments to try and figure out what is going on! Her stool specimen didn't show any blood or other abnormalities in it but how accurate are these tests with just having one specimen????

She did have an illness last year and within the same time noticed her symptoms for hypothyroidism. However I have this huge feeling that my daughter has had hypothyroidism and something going on with her intestines since birth. I know that is is mandatory to test for hypothyroidism at birth but what i would like to know is what the results were and what reference range was used!! And with a Mother who has hashimotos don't ya think they would have tested the antibodies for thyroid then??? I couldn't breast feed because i didn't produce milk so the twins were put on formula and Aislan's body didn't like the milk based formula and had to be put on this prescription stuff....hopefully there was no soy in it! Deep breath.

Now i am hoping they did the correct tests! I saw two different tests on the slip specifically for Celiac so i am hoping that is enough. I can hear the doc now "everything looks normal" If i don't hear from anyone this afternoon i will call and get some answers.

Michelle

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