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aeshlea

Top Three Suggestions For A New Gluten Free Girl?

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Hello all,

I am new to this forum, and new to the diet. New to everything really. I was tested and received the positive results just yesterday that I am gluten intolerant. I am going to by some books on the topic...but since there is a whole world out there with people who deal/live with this daily I want to know what the top three things people who have this would like me know. Suggestions, tips, stuff I will enjoy, favorite recipes, websites that would help, things that I should be prepared for..ANYTHING.....whatever you guys think, from your own perspective, that I should know. Thank you ALL so much for this..


Depression, asthma, a million enviromental allergies, psoriasis,

fatigue, sleepy after eating, extreme IBS symptoms, muscle and body pain apon waking, acne

when I never had it before - all developed (or at least became obvious) in the last 5 years

Diagnosed Gluten Intolerant November '07

Happily (for the most part) gluten free for 3 months, go me!

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1 - SHOPPING - Don't run out and buy a bunch of "replacements", like gluten-free bread and pasta. It will NOT taste good right away. After a couple of weeks (or months) of being "naturally" gluten free, the replacements don't taste bad at all. Stock up on naturally gluten-free stuff, like meats and veggies. But, you will probably go through some withdrawel (gluten is addictive). The best way to deal with withdrawel is to NOT CHEAT. Get yourself some safe, but guilt-filled yummy treats. I did not go casein (dairy) free, I used Butterfingers for my treats. They were great because they have that "crunch" that is absent in so many gluten-free things. I carried them with me in my purse, and had one any time I felt the urge to have something with gluten.

2 - EATING OUT - Avoid it for now, if possible. There are restaurants that have gluten-free menus, but a lot of people get sick the first couple of times they eat out because they don't know how to tell the restaurant staff how their food needs to be prepared. Before you eat out, read a bunch of the posts on the "Gluten-Free Restaurants" board.

3 - AT HOME - If you live with people who will continue to eat gluten, you need to be extra careful. Try to make them understand that crumbs can make you very sick. If possible, dedicate one area of the kitchen to be gluten-free. NOTHING that could have gluten is allowed to be in that area. Some people end up getting their own cooking utensils, pots, pans, plastic containers. The theory is that gluten can get trapped in the little grooves and scratches. I got myself a large cookie sheet, a strainer, a frying pan, a loaf pan, a toaster, and some cooking utensils. All of our pots were already stainless steel and I felt like those were safe. The toaster will be absolutely essential once you start eating gluten-free bread. All of the new stuff that I got, I chose something with an odd-colored handle. Everyone in the house knows that nothing with a purple handle can be used unless I say it's ok. The cookie sheet I just got a shape that we didn't already have.

Well, those are my top three. Good luck!

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Hi and welcome!

I would suggest the following:

1. Read everything you can on this site and others. There are some good blogs and other website that are very helpful. This site http://www.celiaccentral.org/ has a survival guide for the newly diagnosed that will help you.

2. Don't freak out. It's a lifestyle change, but it's up to you whether it's a positive adjustment or a traumatic one. I'm a lot healthier now because I am eating basically unprocessed foods. Your tastes will adjust if you're used to eating a lot of convenience foods. It's also a little hard to be around people who are eating your favorite foods that are now off limits. For me, that's gotten a lot easier as I've spent more time without gluten in my system.

3. Try to stay as close to nature as possible with your food right now. Like others have said, it's probably a good idea to avoid dairy for now. You may find you have problems with other things like soy (I do) and so will want to cut those out as well. This is where the don't freak out part comes in. You will have plenty to eat! I just got a new cookbook called the "Eat Clean Diet Cookbook" by Tosca Reno and it has tons of great recipes that are made with unprocessed foods. A lot of the recipes are naturally gluten free or can be easily adjusted.

Good luck with this. It's daunting at first, but once you get the hang of it, you'll find it's not too bad. Check for local celiac groups in your area too. If you have one close by they can be very helpful.

Ezme

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1. I ate Tinkyada pasta with meat sauce for two meals of the day the first three months gluten-free. No matter how tired you are and how much you don't want to cook, there's an easy standby for you that IS gluten-free. If you're really busy, just get some gluten free deli meat and a package of cheese and roll it up and dip in mustard or whatever you like. Eggs are also naturally gluten free and fast.

2. Whine here. If you can find a friend or maybe a boyfriend who's sympathetic that's great, but most people tend to be on their own with this. I figure everyone is allotted three weeks of whining time, (poor me), until they've gotten over their gluten addiction.

3. The proverbial grain of salt. There's going to be lots of people who ask stupid questions and say, "Oh, just a little won't hurt!" Especially if you're Italian, it would seem. I've seen a number of different responses, but my favorite is, "Well, would you like to have just a little Ex-Lax mixed with some poison ivy and join me?" I actually had someone say, "But pasta's not made from wheat, it's made from flour." Makes you worry about the national average IQ.


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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Welcome to the board :)

My top recommendations (in addition to what everyone else is saying) would be:

1. Read the label ingredients EVERY time you buy something. Companies frequently change the

way that they make things.

2. Check the ingredients in your personal hygiene products (soaps, lotions, toothpaste, cream

rinse, etc.), as well as any medication or supplements that you take.

3. Many of the "mainstream" food company's (Hormel, Perdue, Ore-Ida) have websites listing the

food that they manufacture that is gluten free...still you need to check the label.

I agree with JNBunnie1. Enjoy the Tinkyada pasta. In addition to gluten free meat sauce, sometimes I make it with chicken and veggies and add a little gluten free dressing or butter and garlic. Make sure that you have a new colander to strain the pasta with.

Cindy


Diagnosed with Celiac Disease April 2005

Diabetic

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I agree with JNBunnie1. Enjoy the Tinkyada pasta. In addition to gluten free meat sauce, sometimes I make it with chicken and veggies and add a little gluten free dressing or butter and garlic. Make sure that you have a new colander to strain the pasta with.

Cindy

Scuse me for going off topic, but alfredo's a good way to play with Tinkyada too. Just thought I'd mention..............


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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1. You'll save money on gluten-free replacements by asking here about which brands are good! Some of the stuff out there is delicious and I'm sure someone here can tell you which ones are.

2. It seems so hard in the beginning but very soon you'll look back and wonder why it seemed so overwhelming at first.

3. Don't be afraid to insist on safe food and safe food prep with your family or at a restaurant.

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1) Check your cosmetics, soap, body wash, lotion, shampoo, conditioner. Many of them contain gluten. I discovered 3 weeks into gluten free that my chapstick had gluten.

2) If you are on any regular medication, make sure it is gluten free.

3) Look forward to how much better you will feel going gluten free.

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Guest j_mommy

WELCOME!!! :D

1. Buy Living Gluten Free for dummies by Dana Korn, Awesome book

2. Instead of going out and buying a gluten-free cookbook I.....Got a binder, a printer cartridge and printed off reciepes from this forum under the Reciepes section!!!! This way you know they are tried and true reciepes!

3. Shop around to find prices if possible! I have to drive an hour to do my shopping and now I know which store has the products I like. I agree with always read labels and take along the list with you to check for ingredients! Here is the link for the unsafe food/ingredient list:

https://www.celiac.com/articles/182/1/Unsaf...ents/Page1.html

Good Luck and it does get easier with time!

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1. Make a notebook for your car with the gluten free menus and shopping lists that includes brands, until you get the hang of shopping... Maps to your local health food stores or Whole Foods etc...

2. Join your local support group.

3. Read some books on celiac & Super Foods which is not a gluten-free book but a good refresher on nutrition. I also like "eat right for your blood type" again not totally gluten-free but you can just cross out parts that do not apply...

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1. Make sure you buy new pots and pans and a toaster, serving spoons, etc.

2. (This was already kinda mentioned but...)Don't let people tell you it's not worth it. As much as you are going to seem like a PITA, you and your health are worth it! Do NOT let anybody tell you otherwise!

3. Enjoy all of the excitement when you make a new gluten free dish and it tastes good!! :) And, don't be too disappointed if stuff turns out bad! :o

Kassandra


Dairy/Casein Free- March 2007

Gluten Free- May 2007

Soy Free- August 2007

Sugar Free- January 2008

Starch Free- January 2008

Egg Free (again!)- February 2008

Sulfur Free- May 2008

Dx'd Lyme Disease and co-infections- December 2007

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1. Visit these forums often! Save links of favorite sites you don't want to print. Send some of the links to family and close friends who may be interested or concerned.

2. Take it one day at a time.

3. Remind yourself that now you feel confined, but soon you will feel better than you knew possible.


Life-long symptoms- difficulty gaining weight, fatigue, constipation, large stool, gas, dry skin, sinus allergies. Doctors recommended eating larger portions. Symptoms worsened.

Symptoms lasted three months before going gluten-free- weight loss, D, extreme irritability, skin problems.

11/06 Positive bloodwork.

12/06 Started gluten-free diet.

1/07 Canceled biopsy (symptoms were gone and I was finally gaining weight- 10 pounds in six weeks).

9/07 I've gained 20 pounds. Yeah!

9/08 Youngest daughter diagnosed with Celiac Disease. (D eliminated, behavior improved, schoolwork improved.)

11/08 Two years gluten-free!

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Living Gluten Free for dummies by Dana Korn

This was going to be my number one too, this book goes beyond awesome for beginners! (and the coffee cake recipe is wonderful!)

(revised) #1 on my list is... dont let your cravings rule you, you need to rule them...... if a particular food starts invading your thoughts and dreamsuse that energy to find a gluten-free (gluten free) replacement. You will find after a week or 2 you will have plenty of new places to buy those things you are craving, and you can take it ... One craving at a time :D

#2 You may not notice a change right away, dont give up! you most likely are feeling better than you think.... yes one day you also will get an accidental glutening and say "OMG I felt like that all the time how could i stand it" thats when you will know you are indeed getting better. Dont expect results the first day, you basically ingested this poison for years it will take some time to get everything sorted out, but dont give up there IS a rainbow at the end of the first initial struggle, as with all things, good things come to those who wait (and eat gluten free, lol)

#3 do not give up and dont let anyone bully you or shame you into going off the diet, yes they will try, even people you would least expect it from, they dont understand and may never understand but this is your life not theirs.

and finally......

#4 come complain here we have been there done that multiple times and we deal with these issues daily.

P.S. depending on where you live the sandwich meat and cheese "roll" is a good quick meal... Hormel brand meats have "gluten free" on the packaging if they are gluten free B) I actually add a couple slices of pepperoni to mine for a little bit of extra zing!


Just my .00000002 cents worth

If I knew what I was doing years ago I would have half a clue today!

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I am going to by some books on the topic...but since there is a whole world out there with people who deal/live with this daily I want to know what the top three things people who have this would like me know.

My top book recommendation would be Celiac Disease: A Hidden Epidemic by Dr. Peter Green.

I bought a rice cooker that can also be used as a steamer and a crock pot, this has made cooking so much easier. It's the best investment I've made so far. Once a week I make a whole pot full of rice, store it in the fridge in ziploc bags, and microwave a cup or two whenever I need it.

Kate


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Celiac symptoms since 1985 (gluten-free since 9/2/07)

Vitiligo since 1991

Environmental allergies since 1992

Polycystic Ovary Disease since 1993

HLA DQA 1*05 (DQ5)

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Buy a crockpot

Buy a George Forman Grill (Or something comparable)

Buy STAINLESS STEEL pots/pans - (I just had a scare because I used a gluten containing sponge to wash it and didn't know if I could safely use it again)

If you're not in a glutenfree household, I hope you can block off a part of your kitchen strictly for gluten free preparation and storage.

Message anytime, I've just been through the first 3 months and learned so much.


10-06 Diagnosed Urinary Tract Infection (Allergic to Cipro, Bactrim, Macrobid, Doxycycline, Monocycline, Penicillin) - This UTI is still present with no symptoms.

10-06 Diagnosed "Acid Reflux" (Nexium didn't work)

12-06 Endoscopy diagnosed Gastritis (Negative Bioposy)

12-06 Negative bloodwork for Celiac Disease, Diagnosed "Gastroparesis" - Started Zelnorm

1-07 Diagnosed "IBS-C" - Still taking Zelnorm

3-07 HIDA scan to check gallbladder which was fully functional.

3-07 Zelnorm taken off market, started Domperidone

4-21-07 Emergency Appendectomy (FUUUNN!)

7-24-07 Enterolab results came back positive

Gluten Free since that night....

...Still not feeling great.

"Don't expect constant success, but strive for constant growth."

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Buy a George Forman Grill (Or something comparable)

If you're not in a glutenfree household, I hope you can block off a part of your kitchen strictly for gluten free preparation and storage.

I love my Forman grill, but I had to get my own and specify that it was gluten free. Before I did this, I used the old one that I had, and glutened myself :( . My son likes to make grilled cheese sandwiches on it (with regular bread) and apparently didn't get all of the gluten off.


Diagnosed with Celiac Disease April 2005

Diabetic

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I have to say thank you SOO much to everyone who has posted so far. Really great book suggestions and you guys brought up things I wouldn't have thought about (medications, shampoo, etc)along with the support. I am so grateful tfor this. I haven't started the diet yet. That happens tommorrow. I gave myself this weekend to say good bye to some of my lovers (betty crocker chocolate cake, whole-wheat pasta, oatmeal blueberry muffins, mcdonalds french fries etc...)I have to say I am a little obsessed with this forum here...I have been on here searching questions and reading about everything I can while I prepare for this. I spend hours on here..maybe that is normal since this is new to me. But I wanted to thank everyone for all the suggestions and I welcome anyone else who reads this to add their two cents as well.


Depression, asthma, a million enviromental allergies, psoriasis,

fatigue, sleepy after eating, extreme IBS symptoms, muscle and body pain apon waking, acne

when I never had it before - all developed (or at least became obvious) in the last 5 years

Diagnosed Gluten Intolerant November '07

Happily (for the most part) gluten free for 3 months, go me!

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I have to say thank you SOO much to everyone who has posted so far. Really great book suggestions and you guys brought up things I wouldn't have thought about (medications, shampoo, etc)along with the support. I am so grateful tfor this. I haven't started the diet yet. That happens tommorrow. I gave myself this weekend to say good bye to some of my lovers (betty crocker chocolate cake, whole-wheat pasta, oatmeal blueberry muffins, mcdonalds french fries etc...)I have to say I am a little obsessed with this forum here...I have been on here searching questions and reading about everything I can while I prepare for this. I spend hours on here..maybe that is normal since this is new to me. But I wanted to thank everyone for all the suggestions and I welcome anyone else who reads this to add their two cents as well.

I just have to say I'm really impressed, I didn't have the sense to have a 'goodbye' weekend before I went gluten-free. god, do I wish I had one last toaster strudel..................


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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1. Read Gluten-Free Girl by Shauna James Ahern. It just was released this past week, and she makes cooking gluten-free joyous. It is available at Barnes & Noble and Amazon. I read it in the store yesterday and then went back today and bought it. She also has a website, glutenfreegirl.com (I would make this a link, but don't know how).

2. It's entirely possible that you can continue to eat McD's french fries. Most McD"s have a dedicated fryer for their french fries, so you aren't going to get glutened by them.

3. Come here, often! :)

Fran

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My top 3 suggestions are a bit different than everyone else's:

1) Go through your cabinets and refrigerator and throw out or give away all the gluten containing food.

2) Go to the health food grocery store and buy all the replacements you want. The Vitamin Cottage near me has a list of all the gluten free food they carry so I don't have to spend all day squinting at the labels. It was very handy. See if your grocery store has something similar. If not buy a gluten free product guide. Don't sweat it when something isn't that good. You have to try alot of brands to find the ones you like. I ended up giving my husband alot of gluten free food to finish off if I didn't like something. At this point I've found very good to excellent replacements for everything I can think of. It's the same as finding your favorite gluten containing brand of something, you may not hit it on the first try but eventually will if you keep trying.

3) Decide that going gluten free isn't that hard. Your mental attitude will influence your reaction to things. My Dr. asked if eating gluten free was hard and was really surprised when I said no. But really it's not. There are plenty of product choices and if you don't have them nearby you can order them on-line. Also lots of restaurants make gluten free food.

My biggest problem has been accidental cross contamination. I didn't know about replacing my toaster until I poisoned myself. I quickly learned to never ever eat anything prepared in someone else's kitchen. Fruit cut up on the wrong cutting board is what caught me. Order a gluten free restaurant guide and read the introduction that tells you how to order. It is harder than it looks and nothing is safe until you explore the cooking method. It took me a while to get this right and after I did my accidental poisonings went down.

Best,

Michelle

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I actually had someone say, "But pasta's not made from wheat, it's made from flour." Makes you worry about the national average IQ.

I would laugh but I just encountered that one. You can't laugh when you see that serious look on their face. :(


Shellfish free since 1980

Milk free (all forms) since 1991

Feingold in 2003

First gluten-free round 2007

Now entering full time Gluten free, egg free, almond/peanut free

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I'm a newbie, just dx via Enterolab. I'm making the transition fine, except for not knowing how far to go with decontaminating my kitchen. We bought many new things, except not new dishes or pots and pans. Do I truly need new pots and pans? What about my old plates, bowls. etc? I want to do this right, but don't want to go overboard as it's causing financial strain. I seem to be getting mixed messages about what you can keep or need to replace.

Thanks!

TGrand

1. Make sure you buy new pots and pans and a toaster, serving spoons, etc.

2. (This was already kinda mentioned but...)Don't let people tell you it's not worth it. As much as you are going to seem like a PITA, you and your health are worth it! Do NOT let anybody tell you otherwise!

3. Enjoy all of the excitement when you make a new gluten free dish and it tastes good!! :) And, don't be too disappointed if stuff turns out bad! :o

Kassandra


TGrand

gluten free since 10/18/07

casein free since 4/08

...and feeling better than I ever have!

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That is a good question that I wonder about too. The general consensus I have gotten is you need a new collander for straining (as gluten gets stuck easily in those) and you need new cooking utensils if they are wood or plastic since wood and plastic could have tiny little scratches in it that could hold the gluten. But I wonder if you just cleaned it REALLY WELL it would be okay...I guess you could try that if you can't afford it, although I don't know if you would really want to.

As for pots and pans, I have heard a lot about how its important if there are nics or scratches, but as I am new to this all as well, I 'feel' like I am going overboard. But if people who have been dealing with this longer then me (which is about everybody) tell me its important I would think about it more seriously..

Maybe others on here can tell you if they used the same pots and pans and stuff and were okay...


Depression, asthma, a million enviromental allergies, psoriasis,

fatigue, sleepy after eating, extreme IBS symptoms, muscle and body pain apon waking, acne

when I never had it before - all developed (or at least became obvious) in the last 5 years

Diagnosed Gluten Intolerant November '07

Happily (for the most part) gluten free for 3 months, go me!

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