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CtheCeliac

Girl Scout Cookie Sales

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I have been gluten-free for 11 months and am getting nervous about the emphasis (and borderline obsession) with cookie sales for GS. I feel like I'm managing my diet fine, but the thought of managing and sending my daughter to sell and distribute cookies is stressing me out. For one, I've designated the other leader and another parent to organize the sales, etc.

But I just don't want to be around the cookies, and I'm still concerned my daughter may have a sensitivity or intolerance. Her first bloodwork was fine, but I understand sometimes that's true of a first testing on a child. I've been told by a family member to "get over" my issue with the cookies, but it feels like my child and I will be promoting something (safe for most other people) that was leading to my illness a year ago (and probably earlier). I know that sounds so extreme; I keep regular non-gluten-free food and snacks in the house for the family. They're mostly stuck with gluten-free at dinner. Aside from the cookie sales, I believe in what GS does and their goals.


Life-long symptoms- difficulty gaining weight, fatigue, constipation, large stool, gas, dry skin, sinus allergies. Doctors recommended eating larger portions. Symptoms worsened.

Symptoms lasted three months before going gluten-free- weight loss, D, extreme irritability, skin problems.

11/06 Positive bloodwork.

12/06 Started gluten-free diet.

1/07 Canceled biopsy (symptoms were gone and I was finally gaining weight- 10 pounds in six weeks).

9/07 I've gained 20 pounds. Yeah!

9/08 Youngest daughter diagnosed with Celiac Disease. (D eliminated, behavior improved, schoolwork improved.)

11/08 Two years gluten-free!

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Guest lorlyn

I am not crazy about the idea of selling GS cookies either. My 11 year old daughter and husband have Celiac and I just do not like having them around. We have to sell 100 boxes so they are everywhere in my house and cars for weeks. I am getting to the point it would be easier in the long run is just pay the $300.00 and drop off the cookies to a food shelter

I have been gluten-free for 11 months and am getting nervous about the emphasis (and borderline obsession) with cookie sales for GS. I feel like I'm managing my diet fine, but the thought of managing and sending my daughter to sell and distribute cookies is stressing me out. For one, I've designated the other leader and another parent to organize the sales, etc.

But I just don't want to be around the cookies, and I'm still concerned my daughter may have a sensitivity or intolerance. Her first bloodwork was fine, but I understand sometimes that's true of a first testing on a child. I've been told by a family member to "get over" my issue with the cookies, but it feels like my child and I will be promoting something (safe for most other people) that was leading to my illness a year ago (and probably earlier). I know that sounds so extreme; I keep regular non-gluten-free food and snacks in the house for the family. They're mostly stuck with gluten-free at dinner. Aside from the cookie sales, I believe in what GS does and their goals.

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I like to support the GS but I also do not want them anywhere around myself or my home, what I did last year was give the GS a donation and said sorry I can't eat those I have a food allergy, she thanked me for the donation and left. I know my hubby buys them from work, but he keeps them at work.


Just my .00000002 cents worth

If I knew what I was doing years ago I would have half a clue today!

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I'm a GS leader and love the cookie sales! It is such a great learning experience for the girls. They learn about counting money, budgeting, sales, organizing, and so many other things. Last year I was also the 'Cookie Manager' and stored all the cookies in my house. I don't have a problem with them being in my house because of the gluten issue because they are all wrapped in plastic and then put in the boxes. My only problem is that they will be tempting to have around, especially the Caramel Delites! My other family members can eat them and I wouldn't want to deprive them.

I understand how some of you feel about having them in your house. I think designating others to organize the sale and store cookies is a great alternative. I had an offer for another mom to store the cookies at her house and I might take her up on it. Not because of the gluten but because our house is so small and last year I had 60 cases go through here. Cookies were everywhere!

Lorlyn, maybe you could sell them at a booth sale? It wouldn't take long to sell that many boxes if you set up a table at a grocery store or chain store. And you wouldn't have to store them for very long.

Donations are nice too. In our area we use the donation money to buy cookies for troops at war. It's a very nice way to say you care to soldiers. I see a lot of people who are diabetic or have food allergies that donate money because they can't eat the cookies.

It would be nice for the Girl Scouts to come up with a gluten free cookie. I know the website for their nut sales has a lot of items listed as gluten free.


Joni

Dx'd with Celiac Disease 8/01/07

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With apologies to Girl Scouts, I think we should all boycott the cookie sales.

We all know that gluten affects far more of us than those who have been diagnosed with celiac. Anybody with a diagnosis of IBS, autoimmune thyroid disease, diabetes, lupus, MS, fibromyalgia, lymphoma, psoriasis--all of these people will be sicker as a result of eating Girl Scout cookies.

What are we teaching our daughters by having them sell addictive poison to raise money?????

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I know how you feel, everytime I see anything like a vending machine, or a consession stands or anything that doesn't consider the people with Celiac disease I feel resentment.

I also recognize that it is so unknown and I try to look forward to the future when more people know about it and gluten-free can become mainstream. 3 months before I became sick and heard mention of celiac disease I was working in food service and someone asked me if we had anything gluten free. I said we have sugar-free thinking gluten was related to glucose...

I am just looking forward to the day when they come by my house with gluten free girl scout cookies, but I will admit it's hard to not feel the resentment.


10-06 Diagnosed Urinary Tract Infection (Allergic to Cipro, Bactrim, Macrobid, Doxycycline, Monocycline, Penicillin) - This UTI is still present with no symptoms.

10-06 Diagnosed "Acid Reflux" (Nexium didn't work)

12-06 Endoscopy diagnosed Gastritis (Negative Bioposy)

12-06 Negative bloodwork for Celiac Disease, Diagnosed "Gastroparesis" - Started Zelnorm

1-07 Diagnosed "IBS-C" - Still taking Zelnorm

3-07 HIDA scan to check gallbladder which was fully functional.

3-07 Zelnorm taken off market, started Domperidone

4-21-07 Emergency Appendectomy (FUUUNN!)

7-24-07 Enterolab results came back positive

Gluten Free since that night....

...Still not feeling great.

"Don't expect constant success, but strive for constant growth."

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I have been a girl scout leader for 7 years. I asked our council cookie manager about gluten-free cookies. He said if the demand were high enough and they came up with a good recipe they would make one. There was a sugar free cookie this year in response to the requests for cookies suitable for diabetics. From what I hear they are horrid, but I have not tasted them (obviously).

celiac disease was finally my excuse to be free of the duties of troop cookie mom. I don't miss them at all. I did have a fondness for the thin mints and Tagalongs, though.

My daughter does the presales and the site sales and that is it. I don't want them in the house either. At the same time, I know how much people love them, so I don't feel bad about supporting the cookie sales. We don't make a big deal of it in our troop. If the girls want to sell them, it's fine, and if they don't, that's fine too. I ususlly tell the parents that if they sell even one box, their daughter can get the cookie patch, if that's important to them. They can even do the "gift of caring" which is where you donate the cost of a box of cookies.

Luckily ours are getting older and the fun of cookie sales is starting to wear off. We also mentioned that we could do a car wash or garage sale and keep ALL the $ and not give most of it to council like we do with cookie sales. The thought of doing a car wash and making the same amount of $ in one day that we usually make in the 3 weeks of the cookie sale is starting to sound good to them.


-Colleen

Dx 8/05 via bloodwork and biopsy (total villous atrophy)

13-year old son Dx 11/05 via bloodwork and biopsy

Daughters (16 and 5) have tested negative via bloodwork

A woman is like a tea bag - you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water. - Eleanor Roosevelt

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Do you think it might be worthwhile to write up some kind of petition, asking Girl Scouts of America to stop selling cookies and to find something else as a fundraiser?

We could include research showing how many millions of Americans are affected by gluten (1 in 133 already diagnosed), and how many undiagnosed sufferers there are (average of 11 years to get correctly diagnosed), and suggest that they might not want to be the target of lawsuits for making people ill.

(I know, I know--in my dreams!) :rolleyes:

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Even in my prediagnose days I never cared for GS Cookies so now that Im gluten free it doesnt bother me one bit. But they can make a great tasting gluten free cookie since trader Joe just started selling excellant ginger snaps.

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I have no objeciton to the Girl Scouts selling cookies. The profits go to a worthy cause. Most of the cookie customers are already purchasing gluten snacks.

However, it is my opinion that any Girl Scout family with health concerns relating to the cookies should have available alternatives such as a donation, storing the cookies somewhere else or other alternative that can be worked out.


Phyllis

Gluten Free - 30 years

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With apologies to Girl Scouts, I think we should all boycott the cookie sales.

We all know that gluten affects far more of us than those who have been diagnosed with celiac. Anybody with a diagnosis of IBS, autoimmune thyroid disease, diabetes, lupus, MS, fibromyalgia, lymphoma, psoriasis--all of these people will be sicker as a result of eating Girl Scout cookies.

What are we teaching our daughters by having them sell addictive poison to raise money?????

The same thing we are teaching the beavers/cubs /scouts when they sell chocolate coated popcorn and caramel corn with nuts.... they have to get out there and work for the funds that make the program work.

GS cookies - no good for celiacs OR diabetics

scout popcorn - no good for a diabetic or a kid with braces or someone with a corn allergy or an adult with dentures.

It's about consumer demand - many people love the cookies and love the popcorn and look forward to helping the organizations every year. If asked for a donation, most people are reluctant but if they can buy something and know the profits go back to the group - they dig out their wallet.

I dont have problem with my son selling popcorn - we go to the door and it is a choice for that person, they can say yes or no.

The popcorn is in sealed tins or sealed microwave bags in terms of touching it.

In our group - it is also a choice - they can sell or not sell for the fundraiser...it is not mandatory.

Garage sales or carwashes are excellent alternatives to selling food items. Heck - even sell "services"...as in GS or boy scouts clean up the yard for a fee, help with chores or painting - as a group, so there is adult supervision...

No matter what product was chosen for a fundraiser - someone would have objections.

My children or I dont feel resentment about gluten foods in vending machines - even if it was full of gluten-free stuff - it would be processed and have preservatives.

Sandy


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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2 of my dd's are in girl scouts, and i have been chosen as the cookie coordinator in my oldest dd's troop. I figure that I won't be tempted to open them, and the have to buy them! But I am not looking forward to it, either. I LOVE the Caramel Delights. They are my favorites! But oh well, I will go and buy my Pamelas mini choc chip cookies, and enjoy those!

ptkds


ptkds

Mom of 4 beautiful girls (the 2 youngest are only 10 months apart!)
Diagnosed with Celiac disease on November 8, 2006; gluten-free as of 12-1-06.

DD#2 13 years old; diagnosed on November 28, 2006. gluten-free as of 12-7-06.
DD#3 9 years old; diagnosed through blood work in October 2006. Gluten-free as of mid-November and doing GREAT!!
DD#4 8 years old; had a scope done on 6-22-07 (at 14 months old) and the dr saw stomach ulcers, but all test results were negative. GI dr told us to put her on the gluten free diet anyway. She is gluten free as of 6-22-07.

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I'm shocked at just how much resentment there is about Girl Scouts selling cookies. I don't deprive my family of food that they can still eat just because I got diagnosed with celiac. I also don't feel bitter about it - to me that's a waste of time. I think everyone has some *thing* they have to deal with and my problem just happens to be celiac. It hasn't been easy and it's certainly not fun, but I look at it as a lifestyle change. I feel badly that some of you are seemingly "angry" that you cannot eat gluten containing food and don't want anyone else to eat it either.

It's ashame such a positive thing as the Girl Scouts selling cookies causes such a turmoil. It's a long standing tradition that many people look forward to each year.

Instead of being annoyed that they sell gluten containing cookies, I think it would be better to petition to them to make a gluten free cookie.


Joni

Dx'd with Celiac Disease 8/01/07

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Thanks for sharing your range of replies. Perhaps part of the issue is reminding ourselves that a hidden source that made so many of us sick is okay for others if in moderation. We've learned discipline, so this issue should be no different. (Maybe we'd just rather spend our energies promoting awareness of an issue that likely affects at least 10% of the population.)

The other leader and a volunteer parent will handle most of the responsibility;

I'll put dad in charge of helping daughter with sales and distribution (he liked selling Boy Scout popcorn);

and encourage donations for those with diabetes, gluten issues, or those who simply choose to eat healthy.

Aren't we thankful that our diet can encourage us to eat healthier! :)


Life-long symptoms- difficulty gaining weight, fatigue, constipation, large stool, gas, dry skin, sinus allergies. Doctors recommended eating larger portions. Symptoms worsened.

Symptoms lasted three months before going gluten-free- weight loss, D, extreme irritability, skin problems.

11/06 Positive bloodwork.

12/06 Started gluten-free diet.

1/07 Canceled biopsy (symptoms were gone and I was finally gaining weight- 10 pounds in six weeks).

9/07 I've gained 20 pounds. Yeah!

9/08 Youngest daughter diagnosed with Celiac Disease. (D eliminated, behavior improved, schoolwork improved.)

11/08 Two years gluten-free!

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I don't deprive my family of food that they can still eat just because I got diagnosed with celiac. I also don't feel bitter about it -

I "deprive" my family of gluten because when I went gluten-free (and they went "gluten-lite"), I saw an enormous range of supposedly minor problems completely clear up for EVERYONE in the family, problems ranging from occasional to frequent tummy-aches to diarrhea to GERD to eczema to focusing ability to colds to allergies to sleep problems to potty-training problems to....

As is so often stated, what we now know about gluten intolerance is only the tip of the iceberg.

I think of all the people I know with fibromyalgia, IBS, rheumatoid arthritis, etc., who innocently buy--and eat--Girl Scout cookies because it's "supporting a good cause." As far as I'm concerned, Girl Scouts of America is--in all innocence--basically selling poison, not just to celiacs, but to anybody at risk for developing autoimmune disorders.

I have no affiliation with Girl Scouts; I never was one, and my daughter is not involved with them. That doesn't mean that I don't think that they are very worthwhile, just that she is involved in many other activities, and Brownies/Girl Scouts in our area is not offered at a convenient time/place for us.

I think someone from this board who IS affiliated might try to educate whoever is in charge of National cookie sales, and, at the very least, insist on a gluten-free alternative.

I'm not bitter, either, bellyfat--I am perfectly capable of making tasty cookies on my own, and I usually do, and enjoy baking them, too. It's just that I'm horrified, watching people who are obviously being gluten-damaged but don't know it, buy and eat Girl Scout Cookies because they are supporting a good cause. Most of the people I know at work don't buy cookies in the supermarket--but they make an exception for Girl Scout cookies--because it's such a good cause. And then they complain of tummy aches and joint pain and itchy skin, but like most of us for years and years and years, they don't put that together with the food they eat.

Wouldn't it be nice if Girl Scouts of America took on educating the public about the dangers of gluten, not just for diagnosed celiacs, but for a large percentage of the population, instead of selling cookies that DO DAMAGE?

Ctheceliac: Canadian Karen posted a very interesting article a couple of weeks ago, which explained why, on a DNA level, the wheat we eat today is such a problem, and potentially for all humans, not just for celiacs, and even "in moderation." I'll see if I can find it and post a link here.

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I just had 2 little GS come to the door selling nuts, candy, choc covered pretzels, candles, etc - (Our GS don't have cookie sales until Jan.) The packaging is official GS marked. I think they had a lot of options for people with celiac. I will read the can carefully, but DH will probably take a can to work, and DD will probably take the other can to school. It was a win/win situation!


Feb 9, 07 - Positive gene test D2 -Celiac Disease and Positive D3 for Gluten Sensitivity-Double Whammy!

Positive blood test for antibodies for celiac

SEVERE Gluten Ataxia - trouble speaking - could not even turn my head side to side - almost bedridden

March 07 - 2 different doctors have documented my records as confirmed Celiac

Oct 07 - found a secret to feeling better - no processed foods - The healing comes from eating raw vegetables, and fruits!

Husband - tested = celiac gene+diabetes gene

3 children-

youngest - doc wont test has w/ Hashimoto Disease

middle- tested = celiac gene+lymphoma gene - dx-celiac

oldest - ignores warnings

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With apologies to Girl Scouts, I think we should all boycott the cookie sales.

We all know that gluten affects far more of us than those who have been diagnosed with celiac. Anybody with a diagnosis of IBS, autoimmune thyroid disease, diabetes, lupus, MS, fibromyalgia, lymphoma, psoriasis--all of these people will be sicker as a result of eating Girl Scout cookies.

What are we teaching our daughters by having them sell addictive poison to raise money?????

While I agree that not eating wheat and sugar will help people who have been diagnosed with many different illnesses, the Girl Scouts selling or not selling cookies isn't going change a thing. People are going to eat products with wheat and sugar whether it's GS cookies or something else they get at a grocery store.

With all the recent research about kids eating too much sugar and junk food and the obesity rates, it does seem like cookies might not be the best thing to sell. But again, cookies can be eaten as part of a healthy diet in moderation. The Girl Scouts have no control over how many cookies people eat.

I was a Girl Scout and have been an assistant leader a few years ago and this fundraiser does teach girls a lot of valuable skills - money skills, goal setting, confidence to talk to people they don't know (in supervised situations!), team work.

If I'm asked to buy cookies, I usually do and give them to my gluten-eating friends and family. Or I just give a donation. That way all my money goes to the troop rather than part of it going to the cookie manufacturer. But I can see why you wouldn't want to be the cookie sale organizer. Booth sales are an excellent way to get it out of the way quickly. I don't think I'd mind being involved in cookie sales again because at least the cookies are all packaged, and I wouldn't have to touch the gluten.


Gluten-Free since September 15, 2005.

Peanut-Free since July 2006.

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I'm not bitter, either, bellyfat--I am perfectly capable of making tasty cookies on my own, and I usually do, and enjoy baking them, too. It's just that I'm horrified, watching people who are obviously being gluten-damaged but don't know it, buy and eat Girl Scout Cookies because they are supporting a good cause. Most of the people I know at work don't buy cookies in the supermarket--but they make an exception for Girl Scout cookies--because it's such a good cause. And then they complain of tummy aches and joint pain and itchy skin, but like most of us for years and years and years, they don't put that together with the food they eat.

?? why single out girl scout cookies - the people at work may not buy cookies at the store and only buy the GS ones..

but I am certain they are consuming gluten from numerous other sources - homemade cookies, cold cereals, soups, breads, pizza, waffles - you name it..that do damage all year around not just during GS cookie sales. Rather than focus on a group that sells a product once a year... we should be contacting food companies that make "whole grain" a slogan to push as healthy... and adding it to previously gluten-free cereals. We should be educating schools and hospital cafeterias - one step ata time


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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I "deprive" my family of gluten because when I went gluten-free (and they went "gluten-lite"), I saw an enormous range of supposedly minor problems completely clear up for EVERYONE in the family, problems ranging from occasional to frequent tummy-aches to diarrhea to GERD to eczema to focusing ability to colds to allergies to sleep problems to potty-training problems to....

I didn't say that you deprive your family of gluten...I only said that I don't deprive mine of gluten because 3 of my family members are not celiac. I had no idea about your family situation prior to this post and if eating gluten lite for them helps them I can see where you wouldn't want them tempted by any gluten containing products.

I think of all the people I know with fibromyalgia, IBS, rheumatoid arthritis, etc., who innocently buy--and eat--Girl Scout cookies because it's "supporting a good cause." As far as I'm concerned, Girl Scouts of America is--in all innocence--basically selling poison, not just to celiacs, but to anybody at risk for developing autoimmune disorders.

I think anyone at risk for developing autoimmune disorders (and do not know it) would already be eating gluten containing products from so many other sources than the Girl Scouts. It just seems targeting food manufacturers would be so much more productive than trying to boycott Girl Scout cookie sales.

I'm not bitter, either, bellyfat--I am perfectly capable of making tasty cookies on my own, and I usually do, and enjoy baking them, too. It's just that I'm horrified, watching people who are obviously being gluten-damaged but don't know it, buy and eat Girl Scout Cookies because they are supporting a good cause. Most of the people I know at work don't buy cookies in the supermarket--but they make an exception for Girl Scout cookies--because it's such a good cause. And then they complain of tummy aches and joint pain and itchy skin, but like most of us for years and years and years, they don't put that together with the food they eat.

I agree it's sad that some people are being gluten damaged and buying products that harms them. But there are so many sources other than Girl Scout Cookies and gluten containing items that are on sale year round vs. the cookies sales which lasts only a few weeks out of the year. I'm not convinced that gluten is poison to eveyone and will harm every individual that buys it. And the people who are buying the cookies are getting gluten from so many other sources, it just doesn't make sense to boycott the Girl Scout cookie sales. I would rather see them promote a product that is gluten free so that there are options for celiacs. Seems like a more positive solution.

Wouldn't it be nice if Girl Scouts of America took on educating the public about the dangers of gluten, not just for diagnosed celiacs, but for a large percentage of the population, instead of selling cookies that DO DAMAGE?

I'm just not convinced that the cookies DO DAMAGE to everyone. Some people never seem to have any issues from eating gluten and have healthy immune systems and healthy lives. For the rest of us, a gluten free alternative would be great.

I didn't mean to target you in my post Fiddle Faddle, I think we just have a different opinion on the subject of gluten being poison to everyone.


Joni

Dx'd with Celiac Disease 8/01/07

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I didn't mean to target you in my post Fiddle Faddle, I think we just have a different opinion on the subject of gluten being poison to everyone.

No offense taken! :)

I think you make many good points. There are only 2 things I would disagree with you on! One is on the idea of "depriving" anyone (healthy or not) of gluten. There is nothing in gluten that is necessary for our diet. Wheat, rye, and barley only provide fiber, which can be found in a variety of healthier sources. So I don't think eating gluten-free is depriving anyone of anything except convenience (which I do miss!!!).

The second is on whether or not gluten does damage to everyone. I used to think it didn't, but Canadian Karen's article convinced me otherwise (http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?s...mp;#entry348300 ).

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