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ConnieA84

Rolled Oats ? Gluten Free?

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Hello All,

I seem to be getting mixed signals about wether or not Rolled Oats are Gluten Free?? Some sources say that because of the way there are processed they are not gluten free, but sone packages don't state anything about wheat??

I really want to make Apple Crisp one of my favorite fall desserts, but I need rolled oats...

Thanks for the help everyone,

connie

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Some celiacs can tolerate oats and some cannot. If you decide to try oats, you need to confirm that they are gluten free. Mainstream oats are almost always contaminated with gluten from processing.

To get oats that are guaranteed to be gluten free (grown in dedicated fields and processed on dedicated equipment), try ordering some off the internet. They're expensive, though!


gluten-free May 17, 2007; casein-light since June 2007

Dx'ed gluten/casein intolerant by Enterolab. Family doc dx'ed "gluten sensitive" after dietary response. DQ 6 & DQ 7

8 year old daughter dx'ed gluten/casein intolerant & malabsorption by Enterolab and has been GFCL since June 12, 2007. Excellent response to diet, including growth! Tummyaches & irritability are gone! DQ 5 & DQ 6

Husband has DQ 5 (elementary, my dear Watson!). Self-diagnosed gluten-intolerant by diet response and challenge.

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I agree with the above post. Generally rolled oats are not considered gluten free due to contamination from other glutenous grains. If you want to use oats in a recipe or something you will need to order special gluten free oats. Please keep in mind though that some Celiacs do have a reaction to oats and they aren't safe for everyone.

You may want to try quinoa flakes in your recipe. They're much cheaper than gluten free oats and they're similar in texture. I use them to make faux oatmeal raisin cookies and I always get rave reviews.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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Our gastroentologist said that the problem with oats is not risk of contamination, but rather due to the make up of its amino acid sequence. it is apparently extremely similar, but not entirely the same, as gluten's amino acid sequence. Scientists are inconclusive as to whether this similarity is problematic. Therefore, the resounding consensus is no oats, even though they may be gluten-free... just to be sure.

I've been dying for a crisp, too. I made a half decent one using just butter, cinnamon, sugar and rice flour for the topping last month. It totally satisfied my craving.

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Angie,

Would you mind sharing the recipe? :rolleyes: That sounds REALLY good!

Kassandra


Dairy/Casein Free- March 2007

Gluten Free- May 2007

Soy Free- August 2007

Sugar Free- January 2008

Starch Free- January 2008

Egg Free (again!)- February 2008

Sulfur Free- May 2008

Dx'd Lyme Disease and co-infections- December 2007

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Angie,

Would you mind sharing the recipe? :rolleyes: That sounds REALLY good!

Kassandra

For apple crisp, I've figured out a pretty darn good recipe and for the life of me can't remeber where I got it. Anywho, here goes.

6 big baking apples, I've been using Macoun

1 cup gluten-free flour, I like a mix of sorghum and rice

1 stick butter, melted

1 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp nutmeg

1/2 cup brown sugar

Stir the dry ingredients together in a bowl and add melted butter, spread topping over apples (preferably in a glass container, choose the size of your container based on the thickness of topping you like) and bake at 350 for 45 min. I like to then turn on the broiler for a minute or two to get the top to crisp up, otherwise it's a bit grainy. My boyfriend makes me make this every weekend.


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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Here is my take on the oats issue.I would not eat oats if they were not marked as gluten-free from a gluten-free grower. I believe there are now four gluten-free oat companies. My doctor said do not do gluten-free oats for at least two years after being gluten-free, giving your body a good chance to heal. If you are super-sensitive do not do gluten-free oats... And if you decide to add gluten-free oats to your diet start out very slowly & don't overdo it.

I'm one who after three years now do gluten-free oats. ( I truly never thought I would miss OATS)!!!!!For some oats have never been a problem to begin with... I think it is trial & error with the oats...

The company in Powell ,Wy has children who are gluten-free so that is why they chose to grow gluten-free oats. The other companies are Cream Hills Estates & Only Oats from Canada & one other that I have forgot the name of.

best of luck

mamaw

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This oat thing is very confusing. I read it was cross-pollination and nothing else.

I am making apple crisp today and I will be using a small amount of oats. Our family is large and I have always fed them apple crisp but the flour will be gluten-free. Although I will be adding oats just a much smaller amount then I normally would use. I am going to try a small amount tonight and see how I do, I will know in the morning if the big d hits me. Honestly I can do without bread but oats is something I love so that is very very hard for me.


~Barb

Gluten Free October 18, 2007

YIPPEE for Gluten free

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There are really two issues with oats. One, the protein in oats is very similar to that in wheat, barley, and rye. Some Celiacs react to this protein, some don't. For those that don't mainstream oats are still widely contaminated with wheat protein (gluten). This is why it is very important to make sure that you use gluten free oats. These are oats that are specifically grown and packaged to maintain their gluten free status. This does NOT mean that some Celiacs won't have a reaction. It only means that the Celiacs that can handle oat protein won't react from wheat gluten. Does that make any sense at all? Wow, I am way too tired to be typing. :)

The recipe for oatmeal raisin cookies is on allrecipes.com. I will try to look for it later. I just use a normal oatmeal raisin cookie recipe and sub gluten free flour (3 parts white rice, 2 parts potato starch, 1 part tapioca starch plus xantham gum) and quinoa cup for cup. You could use any oatmeal raisin cookie recipe.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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I am extremely sensitive to gluten and I eat the oats only from the Wy manufacturer. I tried the McCann's irish oats (which were on the gluten-free list provided by my doctor) and they gave me problems. I also had problems from the Rice Milk I had tried which was also cross contaminated in processing by Barley somehow. The problem - both of these products had less than the 20ppm gluten content so they will be legal to label as gluten free (unless they adopted the no gluten 0ppm definition which can't be tested easily...).

Bob's Red Mill now added a gluten-free oats to their lineup and use the gluten-free facility to process them (dunno how those are yet).

Unless you are just IBS gluten intolerant and can tolerate SOME gluten I would completely stay away from oats unless they are certified gluten free and made in a dedicated facility. (NOTE: McCann's are a dedicated facility but don't check for cross-contamination in the field :( )

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This was posted to my local support group today:

Consumption of pure oats by individuals with celiac disease: A position statement by the Canadian Celiac Association.

Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Oct; 21(10): 649-51

Rashid M, Butzner D, Burrows V, Zarkadas M, Case S, Molloy M, Warren R, Pulido O, Switzer C

The treatment of celiac disease is a strict adherence to a gluten-free diet for life. In the past, oats were considered to be toxic to individuals with celiac disease and were not allowed in a gluten-free diet. However, recent evidence suggests that oats that are pure and uncontaminated with other gluten-containing grains, if taken in limited quantities, are safe for most individuals with celiac disease. For adults, up to 70 g (1/2 to 3/4 cup) of oats per day and for children, up to 25 g (1/4 cup) per day are safe to consume. These oats and oat products must fulfill the standards for a gluten-free diet set by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Health Canada. The Canadian Celiac Association, in consultation with Health Canada, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, has established requirements for growing, processing, and purity testing and labelling of pure oats. These strategies have led to the production of pure, uncontaminated oats for the first time in Canada. Oats and oat products that are safe for consumption by individuals with celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis are now commercially available in Canada.


gluten-free May 17, 2007; casein-light since June 2007

Dx'ed gluten/casein intolerant by Enterolab. Family doc dx'ed "gluten sensitive" after dietary response. DQ 6 & DQ 7

8 year old daughter dx'ed gluten/casein intolerant & malabsorption by Enterolab and has been GFCL since June 12, 2007. Excellent response to diet, including growth! Tummyaches & irritability are gone! DQ 5 & DQ 6

Husband has DQ 5 (elementary, my dear Watson!). Self-diagnosed gluten-intolerant by diet response and challenge.

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This is another weird oat question...

Since it is known that commercial oats are contaminated with gluten due to processing, etc. do wheat-allergy sufferers also have to avoid commercial oat products?

Why, if oats are so contaminated, that a "wheat" allergen statement isn't listed on most oat products?

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Thanks for sharing zarfkitty!

I am always curious about the oat quantity limits, such as the 1/4 safe for kids information. I guess I don't understand what would make 1/2 cup of oats unsafe versus 1/4 cup of oats that is safe.

Hmmm...

I think it's because the avenin in oats is so similar in form to gluten. So a small amount can "fly under the radar" but if you ate enough in one setting it would set off the gluten detectors in your gut.

I'm just guessing though. (Not about avenin being similar to gluten; about amounts of safe oats)


gluten-free May 17, 2007; casein-light since June 2007

Dx'ed gluten/casein intolerant by Enterolab. Family doc dx'ed "gluten sensitive" after dietary response. DQ 6 & DQ 7

8 year old daughter dx'ed gluten/casein intolerant & malabsorption by Enterolab and has been GFCL since June 12, 2007. Excellent response to diet, including growth! Tummyaches & irritability are gone! DQ 5 & DQ 6

Husband has DQ 5 (elementary, my dear Watson!). Self-diagnosed gluten-intolerant by diet response and challenge.

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This is another weird oat question...

Since it is known that commercial oats are contaminated with gluten due to processing, etc. do wheat-allergy sufferers also have to avoid commercial oat products?

Why, if oats are so contaminated, that a "wheat" allergen statement isn't listed on most oat products?

I did a quick google search on "wheat allergy oats" and the wheat allergy community doesn't seem to be as concerned with it as we are required to be. That doesn't really answer the question though... now I'm curious!


gluten-free May 17, 2007; casein-light since June 2007

Dx'ed gluten/casein intolerant by Enterolab. Family doc dx'ed "gluten sensitive" after dietary response. DQ 6 & DQ 7

8 year old daughter dx'ed gluten/casein intolerant & malabsorption by Enterolab and has been GFCL since June 12, 2007. Excellent response to diet, including growth! Tummyaches & irritability are gone! DQ 5 & DQ 6

Husband has DQ 5 (elementary, my dear Watson!). Self-diagnosed gluten-intolerant by diet response and challenge.

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I did a quick google search on "wheat allergy oats" and the wheat allergy community doesn't seem to be as concerned with it as we are required to be. That doesn't really answer the question though... now I'm curious!

It's totally driving me crazy to understand that!

I know Barbara's cereals are all wheat free--assumingly safe for for people with a wheat allergy, however all but one of the cereals contains oat flour--making it unsafe for Celiacs. Kind of a silly thing to be worried about, but understanding the difference would be helpful!

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The natural assumption would be that those who are allergic to wheat are reacting to a different amino acid segment than that which celiacs react to, and there is less commonality between those two grains in that area that triggers those who are wheat allergic than in the area that triggers those who are celiac.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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This whole topic is disturbing to me because it is always well maybe. I am a person that requires facts. The website that hosts this forum has quite a bit of info about oats.

I for one will continue to eat them and I will be using my own oat flour in baked goods because I don't eat the whole batch so I can eat a piece of bread with oat flour in it or cake or cookies. It also will taste a lot better. And oats in small amounts don't bother me. :o


~Barb

Gluten Free October 18, 2007

YIPPEE for Gluten free

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