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1965kid

I'm Going To Go Crazy.

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Hi, Im new here. I was diagnosed with Celiac via a blood test a week ago. The doctors nurse said my reading was off the charts, and my Doc didnt advise the biopsy, he just recomended a Gluten free diet.

I have been trying so hard the last week to eat right. But I spend so much time studying foods I can eat, and worrying about getting glutened that I am a wreck. I have spent $300 on food. Its mostly very fatening. Dinty Moore stew, Hormel Chili, Fritos and Bean dip. I eat a salad every day. I have messed up three times that I know of in this last week.

I ate a hashbrown at McDonalds because I read somewhere on here that it was safe. Well, MCD's website says different. And I have been cooking in an old Iron Skillet that has cooked a thousand fried chicken meals! So after a week of this stuff I am back to square one.

This is so depressing.

Thanksgiving is coming up. I cant make myself trust anyones cooking. Im so afraid of cross contamination, or something. How can I eat at my Mother in Laws? I suppose I will take a can of Dinty Moore. Even if she cooks ham, is it a safe ham? Did the glaze have Gluten?

My question's are:

- Can I ever go to someones house and eat with them? I mean even if they make a Gluten free entre, how do I know the skillet or pan they used was safe? What about their contaminated can opener?

- Do I really have to worry about kissing my daughter after she eats, or petting my dog after she eats?

-Am I reading too much stuff on here?

From what I read, I have to get new pots and pans, new utensils, new can openers, and new dish washing tools (scrubbers), to keep from getting CC.

Can I get glutened from soap? From Shampoo?

I cant eat at Waffle House anymore because everything is cooked on the same grill!

This is all too much.

PS, about me:

Im a male, 42 years old. Widowed father of one. (Shes 11)

I have had bad IBS all my life. I have had extreme anxiety, OCD, and some depression, (brought on by my wifes death 6 years ago).

I saw a show on TV about Celiac and the symptoms sounded just like me. Except Im not skinny.

So I went to the Doc and got the blood test.

I have not been back to see him again. He didnt advise I get the Biopsy. I feel like I should, but I dont really want too.

I distrust all doctors, since one killed my wife. But thats another story.

How can I live like this? My poor daughter. I am so angry, and worried about this new lifestyle. I have no time for her now. My mind is so full of worry over this. All I can think about is "what I can eat, where I can eat, where I can go, no more vacations", that kind of stuff.

I bought the book advertised on this site, (Gluten free shopping - 20,000 items) It is very confusing as none of the stores are in my area (Arkansas)

Any advise would be greatly apprecieated.

Thanks in advance.

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Hey 65:

First thing you need to to is take a DEEP breath. There isn't one of us that has not been in your shoes. ;) This site is the best source of information on Celiac that you will find. Any and all of your questions can be answered here.

Start simple. Meats, seafood, potatoes, rice, veggies, fruits are inexpensive and easy to prepare. I would not buy a bunch of expensive gluten free specialty foods now until you get the feel of things first. Just keep your meals simple and basic.

Take some time to read your way around this site. It will truely be invaluable to you for a while. We have some really great people here. You are not alone.

Welcome


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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Guest j_mommy

WElcome~!

I agree with Lisa...take a big deep breath and let it out! WE've been there...at first this diet sucks and makes you angry and sad! BUT after you get a feel for it, it gets better!

1. Stick with naturally gluten-free foods.....meat, veggies, fruits ect

2. Don't go out and buy a loaf of gluten-free bread right away....research them on here....find out which ones have good reviews and which don't!

3. If you weren't big into cooking before...buy a couple cooks books! This will help with the cost by making things at hoem vs buying premade gluten-free stuff!!!!

4. Yes, New dish scrubbers, colander(if plastic), wooden utenisils, pots and pans(if scratched) and a new toaster.

5. If you weren't an open person before......you'll need to be altille bit now....call ahead at parties or family get togethers. As far as the ham goes....call and ask teh ingredients....fax/drop off/send a list to them(this doesn't always work but if tehy are family most likely they will look at it or go over and check ingedients yourself!

Here is the unsafe food/ingredient list:

https://www.celiac.com/articles/182/1/Unsaf...ents/Page1.html

At first I took this list shopping with me!!!

Good Luck!

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Thank you for the information. I dont plan to try any gluten-free Crackers, breads or the like for quite a while.

My main concerns are about when Im away from home.

This is a big question I have:

I understand I cant cook in my old Iron skillets (which I love), or use my wooden spoons.

But when I eat at a resturant, how do I know they arent using scratched pans, wooden spoons, iron skillets?

Does everyone get glutened from a scratched pan that has been washed? Or is this rare?

There is just so much to learn.

I was on the phone with my daughter while ago. She suggested we get a steamer and start steaming veggies. I said that sounds great, "and we could get some of that boil in the bag rice to put them on". Then I thought. Oh no, can I have that kind of rice? What brands of rice are Gluten free?

These are the questions that are constantly bugging me.

I am having a horrible IBS attack tonight. Im sure its stress. I cant wait to see if this diet is going to make my IBS go away. If it will, all this will be worth the fuss.

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Thank you for the information. I dont plan to try any gluten-free Crackers, breads or the like for quite a while.

My main concerns are about when Im away from home.

This is a big question I have:

I understand I cant cook in my old Iron skillets (which I love), or use my wooden spoons.

But when I eat at a resturant, how do I know they arent using scratched pans, wooden spoons, iron skillets?

Does everyone get glutened from a scratched pan that has been washed? Or is this rare?

There is just so much to learn.

I was on the phone with my daughter while ago. She suggested we get a steamer and start steaming veggies. I said that sounds great, "and we could get some of that boil in the bag rice to put them on". Then I thought. Oh no, can I have that kind of rice? What brands of rice are Gluten free?

These are the questions that are constantly bugging me.

I am having a horrible IBS attack tonight. Im sure its stress. I cant wait to see if this diet is going to make my IBS go away. If it will, all this will be worth the fuss.

It sounds like you eat out a lot. If so, I would suggest getting some Triumph Dining Cards. They are cards that you can keep in your wallet and explain the high points about the diet and what you can safely order or not. They come in American, Chinese, Japanese, Mexican, Thai and Indian. You can check them out for yourself at www.triumphdining.com They also have a Restaurant Guide, which I have used quite a bit when I am out of town. They list several national restaurants which have gluten free menus such as Outback, Bonefish Grille, Carrabba's Italian Grille, Don Pablo's, Chevy's Fresh Mex.

It might be better to get settled at home before you venture out.

Your daughters seem to be right on track. Steamed veggies over rice sounds like a wonderful meal for you both. You can also season it with La Choy Soy Sauce (others are not gluten free). All natural rices are gluten free.

I eat far better (not just healthier) than I did before I was dx'd. You may not believe it now, but you options are endless.

A member here, "NoGluGirl" has a wonderful list of general products that are gluten free and that should be a wonderful guide for you to begin with.

After a few week, I guarantee you that you will feel a difference in your health and you won't even look back. This is the beginning to good health. Congratulations!


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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I hear you. It's not easy when you're first diagnosed. It's pretty overwhelming.

I got stubborn when I was diagnosed and took it one day at a time and refused to be overwhelmed by it or pushed into things I wasn't ready to deal with. If that meant I got small amounts of gluten for the first few months here and there for pots or pans or dishes, well, it was a learning experience, and I was facing a huge learning curve, as you are now. You can't learn it all at once, or be perfect at this gluten free thing from day one on. You'll slip up now, and even a year down the road. Please be patient with yourself.

Just do the best you can and try not to worry too much. There are a lot of wonderful people here who will help as best they can with every question you have.

Violet


"My mother always told me, it's okay to play with a man's mind

as long as you put it back where you got it when you're done with it."

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I know it is very overwhelming at the moment, but it does get a lot easier over time. You will learn very quickly.

Yes, you do have to be as careful as you described. It is very difficult to eat out or eat at someone else's home even when they are trying to accomodate your diet. I have had friends try to cook a gluten free meal for me and I got very sick afterward. There are just too many things to think about.

I, too, started out with the very foods you are describing. It was mostly junk food, but I knew it was gluten free. I lived on corn tortillas, salsa, cheese and gluten free crackers. We ate out all the time prior to my diagnosis, so I rarely ever cooked. I was lost in the beginning.

I finally learned that the easiest thing for me was to start cooking simple gluten free meals and freezing the left overs to make my own convience meals. By simple I mean baking a meat and potato or rice and adding a veggie either fresh or canned. This method provided me something safe left over for lunch and something frozen for times I could not cook. I would do a whole chicken or roast so I would not have to cook every day. I make soup or beans on the weekend along with something baked in the oven, so I don't have to cook much during the week. It really is easy to do. I was not a cook. As they say "necessity is the mother of invention". If I want to eat well, I must learn to cook well.

You will find some places you can go to eat out. I have consistantly been able to eat Wendy's chili in a pinch and never been glutened. Outback has always been a good place for me also.

I spent many hours here reading the forums, especially many of the older threads about products and recipes. I saved myself a lot of grief and money by avoiding the products that did not get great reviews. I started buying only those items that seemed to be generally regarded as the best by people here. I also learned about a lot of mainstream products that are gluten free that way.

I had to change all my soaps, shampoos, etc., because I had a full body itch that would not go away until I did.

It will get better and you will feel so much better that the inconvenience of it all will be worth it.


Positive Bloodwork January 2007

Positive Biopsy Feb. 2007

Gluten Free since January 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,9)

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Salads can be a great meal. Check your salad dressing and make sure it is gluten free. It will get easier. Wendy

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Hi, Im new here. I was diagnosed with Celiac via a blood test a week ago. The doctors nurse said my reading was off the charts, and my Doc didnt advise the biopsy, he just recomended a Gluten free diet.

I have been trying so hard the last week to eat right. But I spend so much time studying foods I can eat, and worrying about getting glutened that I am a wreck. I have spent $300 on food. Its mostly very fatening. Dinty Moore stew, Hormel Chili, Fritos and Bean dip. I eat a salad every day. I have messed up three times that I know of in this last week.

I ate a hashbrown at McDonalds because I read somewhere on here that it was safe. Well, MCD's website says different. And I have been cooking in an old Iron Skillet that has cooked a thousand fried chicken meals! So after a week of this stuff I am back to square one.

This is so depressing.

Thanksgiving is coming up. I cant make myself trust anyones cooking. Im so afraid of cross contamination, or something. How can I eat at my Mother in Laws? I suppose I will take a can of Dinty Moore. Even if she cooks ham, is it a safe ham? Did the glaze have Gluten?

My question's are:

- Can I ever go to someones house and eat with them? I mean even if they make a Gluten free entre, how do I know the skillet or pan they used was safe? What about their contaminated can opener?

- Do I really have to worry about kissing my daughter after she eats, or petting my dog after she eats?

-Am I reading too much stuff on here?

From what I read, I have to get new pots and pans, new utensils, new can openers, and new dish washing tools (scrubbers), to keep from getting CC.

Can I get glutened from soap? From Shampoo?

I cant eat at Waffle House anymore because everything is cooked on the same grill!

This is all too much.

PS, about me:

Im a male, 42 years old. Widowed father of one. (Shes 11)

I have had bad IBS all my life. I have had extreme anxiety, OCD, and some depression, (brought on by my wifes death 6 years ago).

I saw a show on TV about Celiac and the symptoms sounded just like me. Except Im not skinny.

So I went to the Doc and got the blood test.

I have not been back to see him again. He didnt advise I get the Biopsy. I feel like I should, but I dont really want too.

I distrust all doctors, since one killed my wife. But thats another story.

How can I live like this? My poor daughter. I am so angry, and worried about this new lifestyle. I have no time for her now. My mind is so full of worry over this. All I can think about is "what I can eat, where I can eat, where I can go, no more vacations", that kind of stuff.

I bought the book advertised on this site, (Gluten free shopping - 20,000 items) It is very confusing as none of the stores are in my area (Arkansas)

Any advise would be greatly apprecieated.

Thanks in advance.

Dear 1965kid,

You are correct about everything. Cross-contamination is very serious, and I too have some OCD tendencies. I would not have to worry so much if I had my own place. However, I am stuck having to share a kitchen, and my parents are not gluten-free. Getting new cookware and everything is intimidating, but worthwhile.

Another important thing to not is your daughter very well could have the illness, too. It is genetic. Both of my parents are good candidates, as my father used to have ulcerative colitis as a young adult and was an infant that failed to thrive. My mother, uncle, and aunt all had to be placed on 2 percent milk as babies because they spit up all of the formulas, as did my brother and I. One thing is for sure, your daughter cannot be hurt by the gluten-free diet.

I can also relate to your tastebud depression. Do not worry! I have you covered! Bland food is not in my vocabulary. I get bored with food easily. I like flavor and spice!

Welcome to the forum! I have a little present for you! I have a list that should really help. This is overwhelming. I went through this with myself in August of 2006. You spend most of your day cooking and cleaning obsessively. The rest you are on the phone with reps from companies trying to find out what is safe. I decided to save you the trouble!

1. There are a number of things in the regular grocery that are safe. Some things are labeled already. Wal-Mart's Great Value brand has numerous things you can eat.

2. For the love of God use Coupons on items you are allowed to eat. People can get them and print them out online even. Call some of the local stores and ask if they accept online coupons.

3. Check the ads online and in the newspaper. You would be surprised how many people do not do this.

4. Some items like rice flour and rice noodles are safe to buy at the Chinese or oriental market. The merchants are more than happy to help you if you cannot read the label.

Now, here is my list of great things to get you started:

Condiments:

Smart Balance Margarine*

Crisco Shortening

Crisco Oil

Pompeiian Olive Oil

Great Value soy sauce

Heinz Ketchup

Lea & Perrins Worchestershire Sauce (all Lea & Perrins Products are safe)

Sweet Baby Ray's Barbecue Sauce

Kraft French Fat-Free Salad Dressing

Kraft Thousand Island Fat-Free Salad Dressing

Pace Picante Sauce

Ortega Salsa

All Classico Red and *White sauces

All Jif Peanut Butters including Smooth Sensations

Welch's Grape Jelly

Cool Whip*

Philadelphia Cream Cheese*

Miracle Whip

Daisy Sour Cream (fat-free, low-fat, regular)*

Snack Foods:

Utz Potato Chips (Found at Sam


Jin

Strawberry Allergy, mold allergy, dustmites allergy, ragweed allergy, dust allergy, food dye allergy - 1985

Asthma - 1994

Ovarian Cyst - May 1999

Anemia - 2000

4 More Ovarian Cysts - March 2000

Bloodwork for Celiac - November 2000 negative

Colonoscopy, Endoscopy, Intercolisis, Gastric Emptying Study - May and June 2001 negative biopsy

Fibromyalgia - June 2001

IBS - June 2001

Gallbladder Removal - July 28, 2003 after doctor said the tests showed nothing, so it was not gallbladder disease. It was very inflamed and irritated and nearly ruptured the surgeon told me at my 10 day post-op check-up.

Thyroid Disease - August 2004

Celiac Disease - March 2007 Current Dr. refers to me as Celiac, as she says blood tests are often inaccurate.

Official Purple Glittery Bat Keeper, District Attorney, and Chinese Restaurant Owner of The Silver Dragon of Rachelville

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Hello, 1965kid

Welcome to the site. Hope you stop by often. Let me second what you've heard...it takes sorting out and learning how to do things, but it ends up that there are many food choices, and not bad ones by a long shot. There is some cupboard clean-out and the expense of buying different ingredients, but your food bill will settle down, especially if you can do some home cooking. And if you've got a good ole cast iron skillet in that shape, home cooking sounds like it's a possibility for you.

Rice is gluten free. It's my main carb, potatoes being my second.

However keep an eye out for rice in restaurants and fixed up pre-prepared in bags. Any sauced rice in a restaurant probably should be considered guilty until proven innocent. Straight steamed rice ought to be fine, given how it's cooked. As for pre-prepared rice, check those for wheat, starch or anything with "dextrin" anything or caramel color in it.

The cast iron skillet

Those things become like family friends, don't they? I'd say retire it to a place of honor in the kitchen or give it to a non celiac family member or friend, wave goodbye to it and thank it, and buy a new cast iron skillet. I don't think after all those years it'll be possible to de-gluten it.

Recuperation

People have different recuperation experiences, as you'll see in the Pre- and Post-Diagnosis forums...it sounds like there are differences in how long the system of the person takes to get over the effects of wheat and gluten poisoning, which it is, for people with celiac and gluten intolerance. You're in an anxiety-making set of concerns now, but do take heart that there seems to be depression for a lot of us with celiac disease, and once your system gets emptied of gluten there's an improvement of mood...and it's not just attitude, there seems also to be a more directly biological part to it.

Thanksgiving at someone else's house.

Do call the hosts and tell them you're newly diagnosed and what you can eat and cant, so there's no awkward moment of your refusing something and them thinking you're refusing their hospitality. People without the disease have varying responses to a person's celiac ...your hosts may not understand, even if you explain, about contamination, or that something needs to have no contact with gluten. They may try, out of wanting to help, but not get it quite right. Expect this. They don't have very long for their own learning curve, and might want to cook things with gluten in them for the other guests, like stuffing. Just this time, I think you'll need to make a spot judgment on how well you think your hosts will be able to catch on to your new life and do what you need, on short notice.

If you don't think they will insure that no glutened spoons go into the mashed potatoes when they're made (other wise, mashed potatoes might be fine for you), and wouldn't or couldn't cook some turkey entirely separate for you (there are, by the way, turkey breasts and half turkey breasts that you can do up in a pan with some foil over it and just slip in the oven...it'd be easy), then consider either going and eating little or like someone said, skipping the family gathering this year, until you figure out how to do things. Or bring a dessert you made and join people for dessert, not the meal.

Wow, I have to hand it to you; it sounds like you're taking it all quite seriously and really going after it all at once; the total assault. I'm so impressed...I went "find a few, eliminate those, look for more, eliminate those" It will take you awhile, and there will be some "Oh, @##!!, that's got gluten in it too!" To be expected....

The people posting in the Baking and Cooking forum have been comparing Thanksgiving recipes, so you might take a look.

All best :)

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1965kid . . . well to me, it sounds like you are right on track!!! The first step is thinking about all the places that you may come in contact with gluten. In the beginning you will spend what seems like an outrageous amount of time thinking about your new diet. But believe me when I say it gets better and it gets better quickly!

When I started out, I spent so much time on the internet researching food. Before anything went on my shopping list, I would google that item with gluten free in front . . . gluten free Aunt Jemima or gluten free salad dressing. Nine times out of ten, this sight would pop up with a thread/discussion from someone who has already researched that item.

You'll start out with your safe basics (these include hormel chili and such that you have bought) and then you'll decide that you need more variety and add stuff in a little at a time. Quick safe meals would include tacos, spaghetti (w/rice pasta - Tinkyada brand is our favorite), hormel roasts (with au jus NOT gravy - read label, it will say if there is wheat rye oat barley), Betty Crocker potato buds (instant mashed potatos), baked (nuked) potatos (plain or loaded) and Bell&Evans gluten-free chicken strips. A George Forman type grill might be a good investment so that you can quickly & easily grill chicken and hamburgers all year long. Grill extra chicken to throw on top of your salads.

Don't get too upset about the accidental slips. We were 2 1/2 months into the diet before I realized that the syrup we were using was not gluten-free (BTW, don't buy Mrs. Buttersworth).

Good Luck - you have found a great resource. Go out and treat yourself to a new cast iron skillet!


Janet

Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted.

animal0028.gif

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I ate a hashbrown at McDonalds because I read somewhere on here that it was safe. Well, MCD's website says different.

So that's what happened! Like you, I thought they were safe. Stopped one morning and had 2 because I was starving and it was all I could eat on their menu (was on an elimination diet at the time). Ugh! The rest of the day, I felt awful and had D all the next day. I thought it was because of the high fat content. Didn't realize I'd glutened myself. Oy! :blink:


2/05 GERD

3/07 Multinodular goiter (suspicious for follicular neoplasm as of 11/07)

5/07 Iron, vit D, and B vit deficiencies (all of them), but particularly B1, B5, B12 and folate

6/07 Elevated mercury, subclinical hypothyroid, adrenal fatigue, CFS

9/07 Endo/Colonoscopy - neg biopsy (only took 2 samples), diverticulosis, benign polyps

10/07 PCOS (cysts in breasts, ovaries and cervix)

10/07 Major reaction to wheat challenge. Minor reactions to corn, dairy, barley, and refined sugar

2/08 Candida (per Doctor's Data)

3/08 Lyme disease (clinical dx), began tx

3/08 Intradermal allergy testing - high for wheat, beef, pork, tuna, and corn - moderate for almonds, chicken, coffee, eggs, garlic, gluten, green peas, milk, rice, soy, sugar, tomatoes, green peppers, celery, sesame, garbanzo, mushroom, cabbage, strawberries, and spinach.

4/08 Began tx for babs and bart

4/08 Slightly elevated titres for EBV and HHV-6. IgG1 deficiency.

"What doesn't kill us makes us stronger... and stranger."

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This is a wonderful thread for newbies!

Thank you all so much!


2/05 GERD

3/07 Multinodular goiter (suspicious for follicular neoplasm as of 11/07)

5/07 Iron, vit D, and B vit deficiencies (all of them), but particularly B1, B5, B12 and folate

6/07 Elevated mercury, subclinical hypothyroid, adrenal fatigue, CFS

9/07 Endo/Colonoscopy - neg biopsy (only took 2 samples), diverticulosis, benign polyps

10/07 PCOS (cysts in breasts, ovaries and cervix)

10/07 Major reaction to wheat challenge. Minor reactions to corn, dairy, barley, and refined sugar

2/08 Candida (per Doctor's Data)

3/08 Lyme disease (clinical dx), began tx

3/08 Intradermal allergy testing - high for wheat, beef, pork, tuna, and corn - moderate for almonds, chicken, coffee, eggs, garlic, gluten, green peas, milk, rice, soy, sugar, tomatoes, green peppers, celery, sesame, garbanzo, mushroom, cabbage, strawberries, and spinach.

4/08 Began tx for babs and bart

4/08 Slightly elevated titres for EBV and HHV-6. IgG1 deficiency.

"What doesn't kill us makes us stronger... and stranger."

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65, It WILL get better!

A couple of brief but very important points.

- At least for the short term, don't plan to eat out. It's too complicated, too frustrating and too dangerous. My daughter is only 6 so we can live with that, but if you travel with work or anything it will be tougher for sure.

- A nice simple meal we love to fix is a Hormel Vaccum packed pot roast (ask your grocer) instant mashed potatoes and steamed broccoli and cheese. It can all be fixed in about 15 minutes.

- In addition to pots and pans, watch out for your grill. The grill is great for cooking now but some charcoal actually has wheat gluten in it. If you have a charcoal grill, buy a new one and don't use the ones at public parks etc.

- steak, grilled chicken, hot dog/hamburger with no bun, fresh veggies, etc. Don't get too fancy just yet with the marinades.

- when you just have to eat out, go to Chik-fil-a. They cook their french fries in a dedicated fryer that is not used with the chicken. They are the only gluten free fast food fries I know of. Get the Char grilled chicken salad with no crutons. I believe all of thier dressings are gluten free but we always get the honey mustard.

- Outback, Carraba's Bonefish Grill and PF Changs have gluten-free menus, but see point 1 again.

Find 3 or 4 meals you are sure are gluten free and just keep eating them at first. Sure you will get tired of them but it will give you some time to get used to reading labels and research other foods.

Hang in there! My daughter has been gluten-free for 1 1/2 years now and you won't believe the difference in how you feel!

Greg

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If we weren't all crazy we'd all go insane.


10-06 Diagnosed Urinary Tract Infection (Allergic to Cipro, Bactrim, Macrobid, Doxycycline, Monocycline, Penicillin) - This UTI is still present with no symptoms.

10-06 Diagnosed "Acid Reflux" (Nexium didn't work)

12-06 Endoscopy diagnosed Gastritis (Negative Bioposy)

12-06 Negative bloodwork for Celiac Disease, Diagnosed "Gastroparesis" - Started Zelnorm

1-07 Diagnosed "IBS-C" - Still taking Zelnorm

3-07 HIDA scan to check gallbladder which was fully functional.

3-07 Zelnorm taken off market, started Domperidone

4-21-07 Emergency Appendectomy (FUUUNN!)

7-24-07 Enterolab results came back positive

Gluten Free since that night....

...Still not feeling great.

"Don't expect constant success, but strive for constant growth."

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Hi, Im new here. I was diagnosed with Celiac via a blood test a week ago. The doctors nurse said my reading was off the charts, and my Doc didnt advise the biopsy, he just recomended a Gluten free diet.

I have been trying so hard the last week to eat right. But I spend so much time studying foods I can eat, and worrying about getting glutened that I am a wreck. I have spent $300 on food. Its mostly very fatening. Dinty Moore stew, Hormel Chili, Fritos and Bean dip. I eat a salad every day. I have messed up three times that I know of in this last week.

I ate a hashbrown at McDonalds because I read somewhere on here that it was safe. Well, MCD's website says different. And I have been cooking in an old Iron Skillet that has cooked a thousand fried chicken meals! So after a week of this stuff I am back to square one.

This is so depressing.

Thanksgiving is coming up. I cant make myself trust anyones cooking. Im so afraid of cross contamination, or something. How can I eat at my Mother in Laws? I suppose I will take a can of Dinty Moore. Even if she cooks ham, is it a safe ham? Did the glaze have Gluten?

My question's are:

- Can I ever go to someones house and eat with them? I mean even if they make a Gluten free entre, how do I know the skillet or pan they used was safe? What about their contaminated can opener?

- Do I really have to worry about kissing my daughter after she eats, or petting my dog after she eats?

-Am I reading too much stuff on here?

From what I read, I have to get new pots and pans, new utensils, new can openers, and new dish washing tools (scrubbers), to keep from getting CC.

Can I get glutened from soap? From Shampoo?

I cant eat at Waffle House anymore because everything is cooked on the same grill!

This is all too much.

PS, about me:

Im a male, 42 years old. Widowed father of one. (Shes 11)

I have had bad IBS all my life. I have had extreme anxiety, OCD, and some depression, (brought on by my wifes death 6 years ago).

I saw a show on TV about Celiac and the symptoms sounded just like me. Except Im not skinny.

So I went to the Doc and got the blood test.

I have not been back to see him again. He didnt advise I get the Biopsy. I feel like I should, but I dont really want too.

I distrust all doctors, since one killed my wife. But thats another story.

How can I live like this? My poor daughter. I am so angry, and worried about this new lifestyle. I have no time for her now. My mind is so full of worry over this. All I can think about is "what I can eat, where I can eat, where I can go, no more vacations", that kind of stuff.

I bought the book advertised on this site, (Gluten free shopping - 20,000 items) It is very confusing as none of the stores are in my area (Arkansas)

Any advise would be greatly apprecieated.

Thanks in advance.

I suggest having a biopsy. I was told it

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Hi, Im new here. I was diagnosed with Celiac via a blood test a week ago. The doctors nurse said my reading was off the charts, and my Doc didnt advise the biopsy, he just recomended a Gluten free diet.

I have been trying so hard the last week to eat right. But I spend so much time studying foods I can eat, and worrying about getting glutened that I am a wreck. I have spent $300 on food. Its mostly very fatening. Dinty Moore stew, Hormel Chili, Fritos and Bean dip. I eat a salad every day. I have messed up three times that I know of in this last week.

I ate a hashbrown at McDonalds because I read somewhere on here that it was safe. Well, MCD's website says different. And I have been cooking in an old Iron Skillet that has cooked a thousand fried chicken meals! So after a week of this stuff I am back to square one.

This is so depressing.

Thanksgiving is coming up. I cant make myself trust anyones cooking. Im so afraid of cross contamination, or something. How can I eat at my Mother in Laws? I suppose I will take a can of Dinty Moore. Even if she cooks ham, is it a safe ham? Did the glaze have Gluten?

My question's are:

- Can I ever go to someones house and eat with them? I mean even if they make a Gluten free entre, how do I know the skillet or pan they used was safe? What about their contaminated can opener?

- Do I really have to worry about kissing my daughter after she eats, or petting my dog after she eats?

-Am I reading too much stuff on here?

From what I read, I have to get new pots and pans, new utensils, new can openers, and new dish washing tools (scrubbers), to keep from getting CC.

Can I get glutened from soap? From Shampoo?

I cant eat at Waffle House anymore because everything is cooked on the same grill!

This is all too much.

PS, about me:

Im a male, 42 years old. Widowed father of one. (Shes 11)

I have had bad IBS all my life. I have had extreme anxiety, OCD, and some depression, (brought on by my wifes death 6 years ago).

I saw a show on TV about Celiac and the symptoms sounded just like me. Except Im not skinny.

So I went to the Doc and got the blood test.

I have not been back to see him again. He didnt advise I get the Biopsy. I feel like I should, but I dont really want too.

I distrust all doctors, since one killed my wife. But thats another story.

How can I live like this? My poor daughter. I am so angry, and worried about this new lifestyle. I have no time for her now. My mind is so full of worry over this. All I can think about is "what I can eat, where I can eat, where I can go, no more vacations", that kind of stuff.

I bought the book advertised on this site, (Gluten free shopping - 20,000 items) It is very confusing as none of the stores are in my area (Arkansas)

Any advise would be greatly apprecieated.

Thanks in advance.

Check out the restuarant sections for gluten free menus' like bone fish..anyways, when i am invited over to a friends for dinner, i always bring a dish that i know i will enjoy so i will not starve. I will ask curious questions like, "oh that smells good, what did you use for spicing" cooks will always answer you, and if they say something you can't have, you don't have to make a big deal over it and just eat your dish you brought over. Every time i go to a bbq, i bring my own season meat and cheese! Maybe i am in the mood for chips and dip so i make a dip with sour cream and bring kettle bran potatoe chips. Whatever i feel like that day i bring to the persons house, and enough to share with everyone and still be able to get full off of it.

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I was diagnosed less than a week ago and decided that MY house would be the best place for the family for Thanksgiving. This way I can control what and how things are cooked......I am overwhelmed by what needs to be learned, I will make different stuffing, gravy, and desert for myself and keep it seperate from the rest. Does it matter what kind of turkey is purchased?


Confirmed by endoscopy and blood tests October 2007

Donna

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I was diagnosed less than a week ago and decided that MY house would be the best place for the family for Thanksgiving. This way I can control what and how things are cooked......I am overwhelmed by what needs to be learned, I will make different stuffing, gravy, and desert for myself and keep it seperate from the rest. Does it matter what kind of turkey is purchased?

Good idea, babinsky!

There was a thread recently in the cooking forum that talked over chickens with that broth injected in them, to make them cook up moist. The consensus was that you had better look over any chicken with anything added to it very carefully but that just a chicken was fine.

It seems the term for turkeys is "prebasted turkeys" From the Illinois Extension Service: "a pre-basted or self-basted turkey is injected with broth, spices, seasoning, flavor enhancers, and it may contain some salt. The maximum added weight of approximately 3 percent solution before processing is included in the net weight on the label. The label must also include a statement identifying the name of all the ingredients in the solution."

Some ground spices have wheat flour in them, to keep them flowing freely. Why not do a non-pre-basted turkey, and make up your own basting mixture?

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Wow, I am so happy to get all these great post. You guys are really a wealth of knowledge. Thank you so much.

I am very happy to learn that Great Value brands have Gluten Free on them if they are gluten free. What a relief! I was stressing over being able to remeber Hienz, not Hunts! :P Now all I have to remember is Great Value. My family and I had stopped shopping at Wal Mart because we dont like theit buisness practices. But they won me back with the Great Value brand and the Gluten Free labeling. Until there is a national standard, I will be buying Great Value products from now on and that will make life much easier.

I feel less overwhelmed today. I did make an appointment with the Doc for tomorrow. I dont really want the Biopsy (I dont think), but I want to hear it from him again. After all, I have not talked to him since I got the blood test results back. I only talked to his nurse on the phone. She told me I had it, no doubt. But I will feel better after speaking to him face to face and letting him know how much I have learned about celiac disease in the last week.

Im going to go buy a new iron skillet tomorrow. I will have the rest of my life to get it seasoned right. And I will know that Gluten has never been in it. Boy that 100 year old WAPAK Skillet will be missed. I will pass it down to my daughter. I LOVE Iron Skillets. But it takes so long to get them "right". I do know a shortcut though. I will pass it on here so you guys can try it.

Take a wheel grinder and grind the new skillet (indside) down to a mirror like finish. It should be smooth as silk. After that coat it with veg. oil and place it in a campfire or your fireplace. Leave it in till the fire goes out and it cools. It will be nice and black now. Then you can season it again in your oven 3 0r 4 times and you will have the best, non stick, natural skillet you could ever want. The more you use it the better it gets. Just remember, "Never use soap to clean it". Soap will cut the seasoning off and it wont be non-stick anymore.

As you can see, I love old iron skillets. They become part of you. :)

Tonight I am making a list of things I can have and updating some list I found on this website.

Thank again for all the great advise.

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Dear 1965kid,

You are so welcome! :) We all know what it is like to be in the situation you are in. It is frustrating. This forum is a wonderful gathering place. Everyone understands what you are dealing with.

Regardless of Wal-Mart's business practices, I too, had to look beyond that. I am a sucker for food! :ph34r: I know it is wrong, but I am a poor, hungry Celiac! :lol: Food comes first! :lol: It is pathetic to others, but who cares?

Thank you for the tip on seasoning iron skillets! It seems very similar to how I seasoned my carbon steel wok! Cooking with iron is very smart in your case, especially since you are Celiac! The reason is due to many of us being anemic.

Iron is absorbed into your food while it is cooked in an iron skillet.

Dear babinsky,

My brother just went gluten-free about 2 months ago. I am excited that I will have someone to celebrate with this year!

We can have our own dinner here, and then go visit with the rest of the family after we eat! Really, being organized is the most helpful thing. Holidays even before going gluten-free were exhausting. They interviewed Emeril Lagazzi, and he provided some great tips.

Primarily, you want to have anything you chop, mince, slice, or dice done the day before cooking. Store them in ziploc bags so they are ready to go at a moment's notice. You do the rinsing and chopping all at the same time. Cooking prep can take a while, so cutting up things ahead of time is very useful. Premeasuring dry ingredients for things or making up doughs ahead of time will aid you. For your pumpkin pie, you can get those aluminum pie pans and make a pie crust ahead of time and freeze it. The night before the big event, prepare the filling in ziploc containers (they now have ones with twisty lids!) and just pour in the shell and bake!

Butterball turkeys are generally safe. Jennie-O turkeys have a number of safe products as well. Gravy packets always seem to have gluten, but they are separate from the bird, so you can give it to someone who can use it. Thaw the bird the night before. Keep your spoons and spatulas near the stove in a cup ready to use, too. Every little bit helps! I hope you found my tips useful!

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl


Jin

Strawberry Allergy, mold allergy, dustmites allergy, ragweed allergy, dust allergy, food dye allergy - 1985

Asthma - 1994

Ovarian Cyst - May 1999

Anemia - 2000

4 More Ovarian Cysts - March 2000

Bloodwork for Celiac - November 2000 negative

Colonoscopy, Endoscopy, Intercolisis, Gastric Emptying Study - May and June 2001 negative biopsy

Fibromyalgia - June 2001

IBS - June 2001

Gallbladder Removal - July 28, 2003 after doctor said the tests showed nothing, so it was not gallbladder disease. It was very inflamed and irritated and nearly ruptured the surgeon told me at my 10 day post-op check-up.

Thyroid Disease - August 2004

Celiac Disease - March 2007 Current Dr. refers to me as Celiac, as she says blood tests are often inaccurate.

Official Purple Glittery Bat Keeper, District Attorney, and Chinese Restaurant Owner of The Silver Dragon of Rachelville

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Welcome to the forum - - we all know that distinct panic you are in!

I haven't had time to read all of the posts - but here are the two things that saved my life, in the beginning, when eveyrthing was SO overwhelming and new.

First, I didn't buy a single new piece of cookware - and this will be controversial - but not even a colander. :ph34r: I just scrubbed and scrubbed everything, and have never been contaminated from my own kitchen. I may be flogged for saying this - but I really wouldn't bother w/ a new iron skillet.....just scrub it to death.......but that's my opinion.

Second....whenever possible, eat the purest foods. Meat, chicken, fish, veggies, fruits, and low dairy. When eating out, speak to the chef or kitchen manager quietly and charmingly, and just ask for a piece of steamed fish and some veggies w/ salt, pepper, lemon adn butter. This has NEVER failed me.

And DO take a deep breath! It's heinously overwhelming at first....and then becomes, believe it or not, something you don't have to think about that much.

oh, one more thing - - I did, in the first year, take all of my own food to family gatherings, to be safe, and also to take the pressure off of everyone else.

You'll make it.

:)

p.s. I just read your information about seasoning a skillet - in my life, I never knew any of that! Which might make all of my previous advice moot -- can you USE a skillet after you scrub it? I would try - and season it again - it has so much sentimental value to you! :)


SUSIE

Diagnosed January 2006

"I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells." ~Dr. Seuss

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Iron skillets - an iron skillet that is seasoned is different than one that is scrubbed after each use... the seasoned skillet or any other cooking surface that has been seasoned will harbor gluten and no amount of scrubbing will clean it up properly. Can't take that chance.

Eating at homes of others - Just like you 1965, my husband was diagnosed right before Thanksgiving 4 years ago. We always did Thanksgiving with his mother & sister (they live together) however, we felt that it was too much information too soon for them to digest and follow thru on. Meaning that the chance of cross contamination was too great, so we skipped Thanksgiving dinner with them that year . I made gluten-free pumpkin pie and we had dessert with them. One of the things that is problemic with eating at another person's house for Thanksgiving is the "stuffing in the bird." Once the gluteny bread is used, the turkey cannot be consumed by a celiac.

Again, someone mentioned switching of the serving spoons from a gluten side dish to a gluten-free side dish (just like at a buffet) and the gluten-free side dish is now not edible to the celiac. Stuff nightmares are made of...to be certain.

Sometime after this Thanksgiving we got to my sil/mil house early for a Sunday meal to find my sil eating regular gluten Italian bread while she was peeling potatoes for making mashed potatoes. We wanted to get there early as I wanted to do the potatoes for this very reason.

I mentioned to her how the crumbs will get into the pot of unboiled potatoes (yes, she had crumbs all over the table and they were getting into the pot) and her response was a casual "Oh, well when I rinse the water off the potatoes, the crumbs will be rinsed away too." Needless to say, that was the last time we ate a meal with my sil/mil. It was too risky and they just didn't "get it." So my point is, unless you are supervising them, you have no idea what they are doing behind the scenes - you have no idea if they are cognizant of specific rules of preparation.

Last time we went as dinner guests to a friend's house, my husband brought his own food (it was a buffet party with gluteny Italian pasta and her kids (ages 18-25) did a surprise birthday party at their home for their Mom and I didn't want the kids to have to deal with this large party and one person needing gluten-free; so he brought his own food).

As to your children, perhaps they should be tested for celiac as it does run in families (I know my sil must have it but she refuses to be tested as she said she'd rather be dead that have to follow a gluten-free diet. She may yet get ill from this untreated celiac, but it's her wish. She's also very resentful that her brother has to be careful of what he eats, but that's for another thread).

Pie shells: home made using Gluten Free Pantry mix or NEW frozen gluten-free pie shells made by Whole Foods. The home made one doesn't respond to a rolling pin, I mash it with my hands into a circle in the pie tin and drag the dough up to the sides and top of the pan. It looks awful but once the filling is in the pie no one knows about it.

Best wishes


Husband has Celiac Disease and

Husband misdiagnosed for 27 yrs -

The misdiagnosis was: IBS or colitis

Mis-diagnosed from 1977 to 2003 by various gastros including one of the largest,

most prestigious medical groups in northern NJ which constantly advertises themselves as

being the "best." This GI told him it was "all in his head."

Serious Depressive state ensued

Finally Diagnosed with celiac disease in 2003

Other food sensitivities: almost all fruits, vegetables, spices, eggs, nuts, yeast, fried foods, roughage, soy.

Needs to gain back at least 25 lbs. of the 40 lbs pounds he lost - lost a great amout of body fat and muscle

Developed neuropathy in 2005

Now has lymphadema 2006It is my opinion that his subsequent disorders could have been avoided had he been diagnosed sooner by any of the dozen or so doctors he saw between 1977 to 2003

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