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MammaW

Promethius Lab Vs Enterolab

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Just wanted to see if anyone had any thoughts about testing....My friend who is a dietician recommends Promethius lab for testing. I asked her what she thought about Enterolab and she just said she was not familiar with it. I see that Prometheus is more expensive, but has anyone had any experience with one or the other being recommended? Any differences besides the cost? I am going to argue with my insurance company to cover the cost for our whole family.

www.prometheus-labs.com

Thanks for the input

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We had genetic testing done through Promethius. They were very professional on the phone (and I had many questions) and the test results came quickly and were easy to read. My insurance covered the cost (though I did call them before hand to get the cost authorized). Personally, I do not trust Enterolab (never published results, not affiliated with any hospital or medical center, etc.) - others here have used them - I don't believe I've heard of anyone's insurance covering their cost.

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I saw a GI doctor for the first time. He decided to run blood tests. Everything came back normal and I did not carry the gene. I also had been gluten free for a year. The lab was Prometheus. I got stuck with a bill if about $700.00 that I am working on paying off. Tons of fun.

Susan


Dairy/Cesain free Oct. 2005

Gluten free June 2006

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My insurance had no problem covering the cost of Prometheus for my daughter and I. This is how we did it. I called Prometheus first and they gave me the insurance codes of the genetic tests. Then, I called my insurance company, told them the doctor ordered the tests and told them the codes that Prometheus gave me. She told me over the phone the insurance would cover the test. I wrote down the name of the person, date and time of the call with the insurance company. They must have covered it because I never got a bill and that was over a year ago. Just make sure you get a preauthorization before the test is done and you should have no problems.

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I don't believe Prometheus Labs will test for the gluten intolerance genes, only for the 'official' celiac disease genes. If you don't have those, you'll never know if you are non-celiac (according to today's standard) gluten intolerant.

Enterolab tests for all of those genes. I'd go with them any day. Plus, they are less expensive.

I have heard of a few people here who's insurance covered the Enterolab costs, by the way.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Promethius is the only one that has credibility with any of the doc's I've talked to. Enterolab does not have enough scientific evidence out there to back it up and my gastro specialist called them scam artists. I don't know if that's true, but if you are looking for the offical "proof" of celiac disease, you need to go with prometheus.

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Enterolab uses the same lab for the gene test as everybody else. Except that they include more genes in it. So, how does that make it less reliable then?


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Prometheus uses its own lab. It uses blood for genetic testing. Enterolab uses stool samples. Enterolab has no credibility because Dr. Fine has never published any of his findings and he is not affiliated with any major medical center or hospital. Until he has published his findings or even had some peer reviews, he will never be deemed credible by the medical establishment in this country. I know many on this forum believe them...I am one who does not.

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Prometheus uses its own lab. It uses blood for genetic testing. Enterolab uses stool samples. Enterolab has no credibility because Dr. Fine has never published any of his findings and he is not affiliated with any major medical center or hospital. Until he has published his findings or even had some peer reviews, he will never be deemed credible by the medical establishment in this country. I know many on this forum believe them...I am one who does not.

Enterolab uses a cheek swab for genetic testing, as in DNA sample, not a stool sample.

And you know, if we'd all believe only people who have published stuff (and who says that those published findings have any value?), and the conservative medical community, a lot of us would still be sick.

Conventional medicine has completely failed me for more than fifty years. That is why I am as sick as I am right now.

Personally, I'll believe somebody like Dr. Fine over most other researchers any time. What he says makes perfect sense. Lets test where the problem is, rather than waiting until the villi are destroyed and the antibodies show up in the blood because of a leaky gut.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Ursa Major - It's not worth fighting with you...you are certainly entitled to your opinion...just as I am to mine.

Yes, that is true. The only reason I bother saying anything is, that people like you will turn people away from the only place who will diagnose them if the medical establishment fails them. If they don't believe Enterolab is valid, they'd have nowhere to go.

Many, many people here tested negative on the conventional tests, and positive with Enterolab. After going gluten-free they got well, completely validating Dr. Fine's testing methods as far as I am concerned.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Yes, that is true. The only reason I bother saying anything is, that people like you will turn people away from the only place who will diagnose them if the medical establishment fails them. If they don't believe Enterolab is valid, they'd have nowhere to go.

Many, many people here tested negative on the conventional tests, and positive with Enterolab. After going gluten-free they got well, completely validating Dr. Fine's testing methods as far as I am concerned.

completely agree, i for one do not think they are unreliable, i tested threw blood and enterolab, so they cant be a scam. I am even one of them that does not have the 2 main celiac genes.

paula


gluten, casein and soy free

on low carb/low sugar diet

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Well, I guess I would call those doctors who won't or don't think to test for celiac (the average length of time to diagnosis in this country is 11 years), who just label folks as having IBS or psychological issues, who tell folks with negative tests that they can't be celiac or gluten intolerant (overlooking false negatives and the complete gamut of possible problems), who run tests after a patient has been gluten-free (when such tests are useless), who still think celiac is rare or only has certain classic presentations, and the like are the true scam artists. I have read on this board of so many of them out there.

I don't believe that those on this board who have been told by doctors that they are fine but who then improve on a gluten-free diet -- and happen to have positive Enterolab tests -- are making it up.

Yes, it would be great if Dr. Fine would publish. He has fine credentials and has at least explained his work. In the meantime, those who don't have the "correct" celiac genes or who had positive responses to the diet and are unwilling to go back on gluten and then argue with their doctor to get a test -- that only catches a certain kind of gluten damage and then only once it is well-advanced -- have no other alternative.

I don't care if I have an official diagnosis of celiac or not. I just want to be healthy.

I like peer-reviewed research as much as anybody. But I'm not going to continue to be sick just to be a martyr to the cause.

Let me give you another example outside the realm of gluten. I have a balance disorder (I had to diagnosis it, but my doctor came to agree) that has no treatment in the standard literature. I read that a particular herb can help with balance problems generally. My doctor said "no, no, no, don't take that." I did anyway (after researching for any possible side effects or counterindications), and I eliminated my symptoms, which had been going on for two months, were driving me nuts, and could have proven permanent. Sometimes, you don't have the luxury of all the research you would like and you have to make a decision based on imperfect information. I see now that there is a lot more research on this herb now. Perhaps my doctor would be willing to prescribe it. I would have had years of suffering in the meantime.

Regular doctors do things all the time that are not supported by peer-reviewed literature, and some of it bears serious potential consequences. But if they are doing what most of their peers are doing and especially if it is something lucrative to the profession, they seem to get a free pass. If people test positive with Enterolab, go gluten-free and then don't get better, my guess is that they would just quit the diet. (I haven't heard of such folks, though.) There is no lasting damage or major expense involved. It isn't as if folks who get Enterolab testing are being kept from successful treatment of what ails them or are getting sick because they eliminate gluten.

The medical profession is not unified on this subject. I wish I had saved the link to a discussion I saw about this once. There are a number of schools of thought out there. Some others agree with Dr. Fine. See, e.g., https://www.celiac.com/articles/1101/1/Glut...ewey/Page1.html

There are those who require the "celiac genes," positive blood tests, and positive biopsies to diagnose celiac and don't recognize any other problem other than this. Then there are assorted schools inbetween. I do wonder if those in the stricter schools would change their minds if they were experiencing symptoms and the regular tests did not avail?

I guess I'm in the "positive response to the diet plus positive Enterolab tests are sufficient to justify eliminating gluten" camp.

OK, I guess I should get off my soapbox. :lol: If people like their doctors, can get useful information from the regular tests, and can get well, more power to them. It is just nice that there is an alternative out there when these things aren't all true, even if the alternative hasn't been peer-reviewed and replicated.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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Any new treatment, any new way of doing in the medical field is first deemed as uncredible. Many have had very good experiences here and I felt comfortalbe enough to give them a try! We are waiting on results for my daughter of Malnutrition tested through stool. They where very professional (enterolab) and very nice, answered many oft my many questions, prompt and good ( I could read up on them in the net since I got the answeres and knew what to look for), the Testkit came very fast once ordered, when the stoolsampletub was full I sealed it as aksed, freezed it one more time until it was time to go to UPS (or you can call them), put it in the seethrough envelope to seal it and put it back in the box it came. Took my sticker with me adn took it to UPS, she did the rest adn it was, done. The box is prepaid, so all you need to do is give it to UPS or take it there and it'll go there per 24 hour express!

We did test with Prometheus wich was covered by our Insdurance for the Celiac-Gene, the results where back fast all was good! My dd came back DQ2 and DQ8 and my son DQ2 pos.

I can not say a bad thing aobut Prometheus OR EnteroLab! I"d say, find out if your Insurance will cover them, if NOT go with EnteroLab it'll be better on your wallet and the results will be just as accurate!

Well, I guess I would call those doctors who won't or don't think to test for celiac (the average length of time to diagnosis in this country is 11 years), who just label folks as having

IBS or psychological issues, who tell folks with negative tests that they can't be celiac or gluten intolerant (overlooking false negatives and the complete gamut of possible problems), who run tests after a patient has been gluten-free (when such tests are useless), who still think celiac is rare or only has certain classic presentations, and the like are the true scam artists. I have read on this board of so many of them out there.

I don't believe that those on this board who have been told by doctors that they are fine but who then improve on a gluten-free diet -- and happen to have positive Enterolab tests -- are making it up.

Yes, it would be great if Dr. Fine would publish. He has fine credentials and has at least explained his work. In the meantime, those who don't have the "correct" celiac genes or who had positive responses to the diet and are unwilling to go back on gluten and then argue with their doctor to get a test -- that only catches a certain kind of gluten damage and then only once it is well-advanced -- have no other alternative.

I don't care if I have an official diagnosis of celiac or not. I just want to be healthy.

I like peer-reviewed research as much as anybody. But I'm not going to continue to be sick just to be a martyr to the cause.

Let me give you another example outside the realm of gluten. I have a balance disorder (I had to diagnosis it, but my doctor came to agree) that has no treatment in the standard literature. I read that a particular herb can help with balance problems generally. My doctor said "no, no, no, don't take that." I did anyway (after researching for any possible side effects or counterindications), and I eliminated my symptoms, which had been going on for two months, were driving me nuts, and could have proven permanent. Sometimes, you don't have the luxury of all the research you would like and you have to make a decision based on imperfect information. I see now that there is a lot more research on this herb now. Perhaps my doctor would be willing to prescribe it. I would have had years of suffering in the meantime.

Regular doctors do things all the time that are not supported by peer-reviewed literature, and some of it bears serious potential consequences. But if they are doing what most of their peers are doing and especially if it is something lucrative to the profession, they seem to get a free pass. If people test positive with Enterolab, go gluten-free and then don't get better, my guess is that they would just quit the diet. (I haven't heard of such folks, though.) There is no lasting damage or major expense involved. It isn't as if folks who get Enterolab testing are being kept from successful treatment of what ails them or are getting sick because they eliminate gluten.

The medical profession is not unified on this subject. I wish I had saved the link to a discussion I saw about this once. There are a number of schools of thought out there. Some others agree with Dr. Fine. See, e.g., <a href="https://www.celiac.com/articles/1101/1/Glut...ewey/Page1.html" target="external ugc nofollow">https://www.celiac.com/articles/1101/1/Glut...ewey/Page1.html</a>

There are those who require the "celiac genes," positive blood tests, and positive biopsies to diagnose celiac and don't recognize any other problem other than this. Then there are assorted schools inbetween. I do wonder if those in the stricter schools would change their minds if they were experiencing symptoms and the regular tests did not avail?

I guess I'm in the "positive response to the diet plus positive Enterolab tests are sufficient to justify eliminating gluten" camp.

OK, I guess I should get off my soapbox. :lol: If people like their doctors, can get useful information from the regular tests, and can get well, more power to them. It is just nice that there is an alternative out there when these things aren't all true, even if the alternative hasn't been peer-reviewed and replicated.


Susi with Shayden and Brandy

Shayden, pos. with DQ 2, pos. for Glutensensitivity with Tissuetransglutaminase Stool TgA 45 Units

Brandy, pos. with DQ2 + DQ8, DX Celiac Nov.07, gluten-free since Nov. 1st 07, Tissuetransglutaminase Stool TgA 63 Units

Me: Gastroscopy negative f. Celiac, IBS, Oesophagitis, Hiatus-Hernia

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Thanks for the info...I think I am going to try to go with Prometheus if I can get my insurance to cover

My son's gi sent his blood to Prometheus. I was also worried about insurance because Prometheus was not in my network. The doctor told me not to worry about it because he never had a patient complain about getting a bill from them (apparently they accept what ever the insurance happens to pay out, I believe it was 70% of what my insurance company felt was appropriate). I never got a bill from them and that was over 2 years ago.

Nicole

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Just wanted to see if anyone had any thoughts about testing....My friend who is a dietician recommends Promethius lab for testing. I asked her what she thought about Enterolab and she just said she was not familiar with it. I see that Prometheus is more expensive, but has anyone had any experience with one or the other being recommended? Any differences besides the cost? I am going to argue with my insurance company to cover the cost for our whole family.

www.prometheus-labs.com

Thanks for the input

My daughter was first tested through prometheus, by serum celiac panel, I did not choose them, we just had the lab work drawn and it was sent there. It cost us $700, we have insurance, it did not pay and i'm not sure why, her results came back as probable, it said that she required further testing, the pedi told us the results were inconclusive and that to run genetic tests like prometheus was suggesting would cost lots of money and may still not tell us anything, he suggested I put my daughter on the gluten free diet during the summer when I could control what she was eating and if her symptoms improved assume she needed to be on it. I put her on the diet and her symptoms greatly improved, at first if she had any gluten her symptoms would show up again a couple days later, I told this to her pedi and she said that she figures she has celiac disease, despite what tests show, just from her response to diet. We decided to test with enterolab, b/c my daughter did not like being on the diet, and we felt we needed some sort of proof that she did indeed need to be gluten-free, I guess we were just in denial. Enterolab was much cheaper and we discovered that both my husband and I have genes that predispose us to be celiac/gluten sensitive, one gave the celiac gene and one gave the gluten sensitive gene to her, now we are all gluten free and feeling pretty good physically, but my daughter is a wreck emotionally, she was so hoping that this test would have told us that she could be on a regular diet, but we are dealing with this and I know we will get through it.

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So thanks for everyone's thoughts on the lab issue. I am still trying to get my insurance to pay for the testing....I have submitted a "medical necessity" letter in hopes that they will pay. My doctor had no real opinion re Enterolab, but actually uses Prometheus regularly. I think my plan will be to see what my insurance will pay for and go from there as it would be impossible to have testing done if we have to pay out of pocket. what a wild ride this has been. We have been gluten-free, then back on g, then gluten-free again. not sure what is really helping. i guess if i had seen a really amazing response to gluten-free, i may be more likely to forego the testing all together and just keep on the diet. but since i really am not seeing a wonderful response and it is so difficult for my 1 year old to eat anything at all especially gluten-free i guess it would be worth it to know if we have to keep up the fight or not. so i will keep everyone posted. I am goign to start a new thread and post this response as well because i think this thread has long worn out it's usefullness!

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