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Does This Letter Make Any Sense To U?

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THE ANSWER IS FIRST, THEN SCROLL DOWN TO MY LETTER..

----Original Message-----

From: Madhouse Munchies <info@madhousemunchies.com>

To: mightymouth1234@aol.com

Sent: Mon, 1 Oct 2007 12:22 pm

Subject: FW: New Consumer Comment from: Lynn Elliott

Lynn,

All of our products are gluten free except our Creamy French Onion flavor.

It has corn gluten in the seasonings.

Regards,

Heather L. Boudreau

Keeper of the Maroon Swingline Stapler

Madhouse Munchies, Inc.

382 Hercules Drive, Suite 9

Colchester, VT 05446

802-655-6662 phone

888-mad-hous toll free

802-655-7711 fax

-----Original Message-----

From: apache@server1.sharkcomm.com [mailto:apache@server1.sharkcomm.com] On

Behalf Of Madhouse Server

Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2007 1:47 PM

To: info@madhousemunchies.com; mail@madhousemunchies.com

Subject: New Consumer Comment from: Lynn Elliott

From: Lynn E

Address:

City:

State: NY

Zip: 11756

Type: Ingrediants

Email: mightymouth1234@aol.com

Phone:

Comments:

Dear Sir or Madam:

I originally sent this letter like a month ago, but, unfortunately, AOL

default deleted all my medical research and regular mail.

MY question was this? Are Mad house munchies GLUTEN FREE? I need to know

this because my child has CELIAC DISEASE.

Thank you once again for your time and help in this matter.

Sincerely,

Lynn

concerned Parent


Eat Well To Stay Well

Daughter Dx'd Celiac Jan 2007

Dx'd Aspergers June 2009

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Yeah, corn gluten is not at all the same thing as the gluten that Celiacs have to worry about. It sounds like the person who answered your letter just did a search for "gluten" on the ingredients. <_<

Corn gluten is weird stuff. I tired to do some research on it, and came up with it as an ingredient in dog food, cat food, cattle feed, people food, and insecticide. :huh:


-Sarah

--Son, Lucas, age 7. Gluten-free since May 2007

--Son, Ezra, age 5. Gluten-free 10/13/07. Bipolar tendencies, massively improved on gluten-free diet! He's also allergic to a jillion antibiotics.

--My mother has Celiac Disease, dx'ed by Positive Blood Tests and Biopsy. Diagnosed Sarcoidosis 6/08.

--Myself, Gluten-free since 8/07

Time heals all hurt of heart... but time must be won.

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In the scientific world, gluten technically only refers to wheat gluten (the protein in wheat), but it is becoming more common for the term "gluten" to be used in describing the protein found in all grains. So this lady is simply saying that the product contains the protein found in corn, but just the protein part, not the rest of the corn grain. I find that if the grain is not WBRO, the grain name is put in front of the word "gluten" - in this case corn gluten. Celiacs refer to the proteins in WBRO as just gluten because the protein in BRO is so close to that in wheat that it causes the same symptoms although to be completely correct we should be saying wheat gluten, barely gluten, rye gluten and oat gluten. In general usage, gluten means WBRO - the types of gluten that cause immune reactions.

I'm sure this lady doesn't have a clue that when you asked about gluten you just mean the types of gluten that make people sick is so she did a search, saw corn gluten and sent you that. I don't have a problem with this, but I would prefer companies to have someone who know what gluten is to answer these emails. Who knows how things are entered in a database - we all know that it doesn't usually come right out and say gluten in an ingredients list. If the ingredients list said wheat, for example, would she have known to alert you to that?


Gluten-Free since September 15, 2005.

Peanut-Free since July 2006.

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In the scientific world, gluten technically only refers to wheat gluten (the protein in wheat), but it is becoming more common for the term "gluten" to be used in describing the protein found in all grains. So this lady is simply saying that the product contains the protein found in corn, but just the protein part, not the rest of the corn grain. I find that if the grain is not WBRO, the grain name is put in front of the word "gluten" - in this case corn gluten. Celiacs refer to the proteins in WBRO as just gluten because the protein in BRO is so close to that in wheat that it causes the same symptoms although to be completely correct we should be saying wheat gluten, barely gluten, rye gluten and oat gluten. In general usage, gluten means WBRO - the types of gluten that cause immune reactions.

I'm sure this lady doesn't have a clue that when you asked about gluten you just mean the types of gluten that make people sick is so she did a search, saw corn gluten and sent you that. I don't have a problem with this, but I would prefer companies to have someone who know what gluten is to answer these emails. Who knows how things are entered in a database - we all know that it doesn't usually come right out and say gluten in an ingredients list. If the ingredients list said wheat, for example, would she have known to alert you to that?

PLEASE I HAVE NEVER HEARD THE TERMS "WBRO" AND "BRO" WHAT ARE THEY PLEASE? AND WOULD YOU EAT THIS PRODUCT?? IF IT DID NOT LIST ANY OF THE THINGS THAT WE CAN NOT HAVE??

THANKS AGAIN..

LYNN

PS= MY DAUGHTER IS DYING FOR NEW SNACKS AND THIS WAS AT WHOLE FOODS..


Eat Well To Stay Well

Daughter Dx'd Celiac Jan 2007

Dx'd Aspergers June 2009

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Yeah, corn gluten is not at all the same thing as the gluten that Celiacs have to worry about. It sounds like the person who answered your letter just did a search for "gluten" on the ingredients. <_<

Corn gluten is weird stuff. I tired to do some research on it, and came up with it as an ingredient in dog food, cat food, cattle feed, people food, and insecticide. :huh:

UG.. THIS WAS IN A SNACK AT WHOLE FOODS.. ????????


Eat Well To Stay Well

Daughter Dx'd Celiac Jan 2007

Dx'd Aspergers June 2009

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PLEASE I HAVE NEVER HEARD THE TERMS "WBRO" AND "BRO" WHAT ARE THEY PLEASE? AND WOULD YOU EAT THIS PRODUCT?? IF IT DID NOT LIST ANY OF THE THINGS THAT WE CAN NOT HAVE??

THANKS AGAIN..

LYNN

PS= MY DAUGHTER IS DYING FOR NEW SNACKS AND THIS WAS AT WHOLE FOODS..

Lynn -

WBRO - Wheat, Barley, Rye, Oats and BRO - Barley, Rye, Oats

If the product does not list any wheat, barley, rye, or oats it should be gluten free. (although wheat is the only one required by law to be listed).

Sounds good go :)


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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UG.. THIS WAS IN A SNACK AT WHOLE FOODS.. ????????

Corn gluten is the protein in corn. It occurs naturally in all corn.

Have you gone to the Whole Foods website to pull up their list of gluten-free products? I just googled the product...here are the ingredients in each flavor:

http://www.madhousemunchies.com/nutrition/ingredients/

All appear to be safe except the creamy french onion, which lists wheat flour. It also lists corn gluten, but the corn is not the problem. So, the rep who emailed you was correct, she just had her terminology a bit confused.

Oh, WRBO= Wheat, Rye, Barley, Oats :)


"Let food be thy medicine, and let thy medicine be food." - Hippocrates

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Lynn -

WBRO - Wheat, Barley, Rye, Oats and BRO - Barley, Rye, Oats

If the product does not list any wheat, barley, rye, or oats it should be gluten free. (although wheat is the only one required by law to be listed).

Sounds good go :)

T HANK YOU THANK YOU..... =)


Eat Well To Stay Well

Daughter Dx'd Celiac Jan 2007

Dx'd Aspergers June 2009

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If even some of the GI docs are ill infomred about celaic then we cant expect a food company to know. Whne writing letter to companies oyu ahve to ask speicifcally if wheat rye oats or barley or any derivatives from aformentioned ingedients (like malt or plant proteins) are present in the product. Because there is "glutinous rice" which has the word "gluten" in it yet it is safe.

Sandy


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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In the scientific world, gluten technically only refers to wheat gluten (the protein in wheat), but it is becoming more common for the term "gluten" to be used in describing the protein found in all grains. So this lady is simply saying that the product contains the protein found in corn, but just the protein part, not the rest of the corn grain. I find that if the grain is not WBRO, the grain name is put in front of the word "gluten" - in this case corn gluten. Celiacs refer to the proteins in WBRO as just gluten because the protein in BRO is so close to that in wheat that it causes the same symptoms although to be completely correct we should be saying wheat gluten, barely gluten, rye gluten and oat gluten. In general usage, gluten means WBRO - the types of gluten that cause immune reactions.

I'm sure this lady doesn't have a clue that when you asked about gluten you just mean the types of gluten that make people sick is so she did a search, saw corn gluten and sent you that. I don't have a problem with this, but I would prefer companies to have someone who know what gluten is to answer these emails. Who knows how things are entered in a database - we all know that it doesn't usually come right out and say gluten in an ingredients list. If the ingredients list said wheat, for example, would she have known to alert you to that?

THANKS MUCH !!!!!!!!


Eat Well To Stay Well

Daughter Dx'd Celiac Jan 2007

Dx'd Aspergers June 2009

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