Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

JNBunnie1

Oats

Recommended Posts

whether all this talk about oats is just building me up to a big letdown. I would LOVE to have oats again, and I'd be willing to pay more for the gluten-free ones. I'd just like to know whether there's anyone out there who's had what they are pretty sure is a GLUTEN reaction to them? Not just the big D? I suffer for a month when I get glutened, I don't want to take any chances!


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


The protein in oats is similar enough to that in wheat, barely and rye that it does cause damage in some celiacs, but it's different enough that it does not cause damage in other celiacs. If you do get non-CCed oats, it's impossible to know which category you'd fall into without trying them.


Gluten-Free since September 15, 2005.

Peanut-Free since July 2006.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

The protein in oats is similar enough to that in wheat, barely and rye that it does cause damage in some celiacs, but it's different enough that it does not cause damage in other celiacs. If you do get non-CCed oats, it's impossible to know which category you'd fall into without trying them.

Well, hell. What about the oats article Jeff Adams put on the homepage about a study in (I forget which country) where people with (diagnosed) Celiac ate oats for years with no intestinal damage? Did they all just happen to be the unaffected Celiacs?


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

What timing! I had oats three days ago and am finally over the feeling. I will never touch them again!

A friend mixed a packet of Quaker Peaches and Cream instant oatmeal into my box of instant grits packets. I am never usually tempted to eat gluten on purpose, but peaches and cream was my favorite as a kid and I hadn't tried oats since going gluten free. Have to try it once , I thought...

OMG, I never imagined it would hurt so much. Just like a glutening-- I got pains in the low stomach and cramps that went on for a whole night and day. The day after that my lower back was killing me.

Sorry to break it to you, but I'm 99% sure that was a gluten-ing. I guess you can keep arguing whether I was sensitive to the pure oats or whether there were wheat contaminants in Quaker's product. As bad as it was it didn't kill me and I believe in giving things a shot before I cut them out of my diet. I'm retired from oat-eating by my own choice.

If you're addicted to oats by all means don't let me discourage you without a trial, but I would at least make sure to try the kind claiming to be contaminant-free first!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

What timing! I had oats three days ago and am finally over the feeling. I will never touch them again!

A friend mixed a packet of Quaker Peaches and Cream instant oatmeal into my box of instant grits packets. I am never usually tempted to eat gluten on purpose, but peaches and cream was my favorite as a kid and I hadn't tried oats since going gluten free. Have to try it once , I thought...

OMG, I never imagined it would hurt so much. Just like a glutening-- I got pains in the low stomach and cramps that went on for a whole night and day. The day after that my lower back was killing me.

Sorry to break it to you, but I'm 99% sure that was a gluten-ing. I guess you can keep arguing whether I was sensitive to the pure oats or whether there were wheat contaminants in Quaker's product. As bad as it was it didn't kill me and I believe in giving things a shot before I cut them out of my diet. I'm retired from oat-eating by my own choice.

If you're addicted to oats by all means don't let me discourage you without a trial, but I would at least make sure to try the kind claiming to be contaminant-free first!

Oh, I would definitely shell out for the 'safe' ones. I haven't had oats in a looooong time. Mostly I just want some decent apple crisp, though I'm sure I could experiment with quinoa. I just wanted to ask around because a glutening puts me out of commission for so very long, I can't afford to be out of work. glad you're feeling better though!


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Oh, I would definitely shell out for the 'safe' ones. I haven't had oats in a looooong time. Mostly I just want some decent apple crisp, though I'm sure I could experiment with quinoa. I just wanted to ask around because a glutening puts me out of commission for so very long, I can't afford to be out of work. glad you're feeling better though!

I was really nervous about trying the oats...weeks of mouth sores is my dreaded reality--but I finally gave in and bought cream hill estates..good news!! No problems at all..I still limit my intake to 1 or 2 servings a week..some times instead of my oatmeal as breakfast I use the Cream Hill in baking. I will use it as topping for an apple crisp on thanksgiving...It has added a bit of variety to my diet along with some badly need fiber...I think its worth a try as long as you get the pure certified non contaminated oats!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Quaker Peaches and Cream instant oatmeal

If it was a Quaker product, it was most likely contaminated with gluten. Here is what the Quaker oats website says:

Because oats are grown, stored, transported in bulk, they may contain trace amounts of wheat, rye and barley. USDA grain standards allow a certain percentage of other grains to be present in the oats. Therefore, gluten may be found in oats, even if very small amounts of these other grains are present.

Since quaker oats aren't grown/stored/transported separate from gluten grains, they can definitely be contaminated.

We eat the certified gluten-free oats without problems, but I definitely wouldn't take a chance on a Quaker product.

Hope you are feeling better. :(


-Colleen

Dx 8/05 via bloodwork and biopsy (total villous atrophy)

13-year old son Dx 11/05 via bloodwork and biopsy

Daughters (16 and 5) have tested negative via bloodwork

A woman is like a tea bag - you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water. - Eleanor Roosevelt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

If it was a Quaker product, it was most likely contaminated with gluten. Here is what the Quaker oats website says:

Since quaker oats aren't grown/stored/transported separate from gluten grains, they can definitely be contaminated.

We eat the certified gluten-free oats without problems, but I definitely wouldn't take a chance on a Quaker product.

Hope you are feeling better. :(

Thanks for the replies everyone. I was hoping someone would chime in that HAS had a gluten reaction to the gluten-free oats?


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

That would be me! I got violently ill (like considering the ER ill) from Gifts of nature certified gluten free oats and it's just like a gluten reaction. I'm always very methodical about introducing new foods and only introduce 1 at a time and wait a week after because I want to make sure that I know what makes me sick and what doesn't. Now, I had only been gluten free for about 4 months and realize now it might not have been the best time to try them. I've been gluten free for several years now and would like to try again but I'm too chicken. I am extremely sensitive and it takes several weeks to recover and I'm just not sure it's worth it.


---------------------------------

MP - celiac for 10 years

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

That would be me! I got violently ill (like considering the ER ill) from Gifts of nature certified gluten free oats and it's just like a gluten reaction. I'm always very methodical about introducing new foods and only introduce 1 at a time and wait a week after because I want to make sure that I know what makes me sick and what doesn't. Now, I had only been gluten free for about 4 months and realize now it might not have been the best time to try them. I've been gluten free for several years now and would like to try again but I'm too chicken. I am extremely sensitive and it takes several weeks to recover and I'm just not sure it's worth it.

Ok, no oats for me! I'm with you, it's not worth a month of agony. Maybe rice flakes or toasted quinoa flakes would pep up my apple crisp.


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

My sister, the information guru (she's an engineer if anyone out there knows how engineers are :P ), looked up oats for me. She found this:

Oats do not contain a protein similar to gluten, although they were believed to have until very extremely recently. They believe the problem arises because oats are grown on the same fields as wheat on alternate years. So, gluten-free people decided maybe if they get their own separate land and make sure the neighbor farmer's wheat doesn't play kissy-face with their gluten-free oats they could make a killing on selling to gluten-free folks dying for some oatmeal.

This is only research. If someone is sure they reacted to certified gluten-free oats then I am sure they did, too.


Celiac Disease 2007

Spinal Fusion 2006

Grave's Disease 2000

There is a way around every obstacle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

My sister, the information guru (she's an engineer if anyone out there knows how engineers are :P ), looked up oats for me. She found this:

Oats do not contain a protein similar to gluten, although they were believed to have until very extremely recently. They believe the problem arises because oats are grown on the same fields as wheat on alternate years. So, gluten-free people decided maybe if they get their own separate land and make sure the neighbor farmer's wheat doesn't play kissy-face with their gluten-free oats they could make a killing on selling to gluten-free folks dying for some oatmeal.

This is only research. If someone is sure they reacted to certified gluten-free oats then I am sure they did, too.

Yeah, I'm curious whether there's any scinetific analyses of oats as compares to the gluten protein in wheat, rye, blah blah blah......


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

What timing! I had oats three days ago and am finally over the feeling. I will never touch them again!

A friend mixed a packet of Quaker Peaches and Cream instant oatmeal into my box of instant grits packets. I am never usually tempted to eat gluten on purpose, but peaches and cream was my favorite as a kid and I hadn't tried oats since going gluten free. Have to try it once , I thought...

OMG, I never imagined it would hurt so much. Just like a glutening-- I got pains in the low stomach and cramps that went on for a whole night and day. The day after that my lower back was killing me.

Sorry to break it to you, but I'm 99% sure that was a gluten-ing. I guess you can keep arguing whether I was sensitive to the pure oats or whether there were wheat contaminants in Quaker's product. As bad as it was it didn't kill me and I believe in giving things a shot before I cut them out of my diet. I'm retired from oat-eating by my own choice.

If you're addicted to oats by all means don't let me discourage you without a trial, but I would at least make sure to try the kind claiming to be contaminant-free first!

For starters, packaged instant oatmeal is not the same thing as oats. Packaged foods like that are always more likely to be a source.


~Barb

Gluten Free October 18, 2007

YIPPEE for Gluten free

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

So I just had a thought about certified gluten free oats. The Gifts of Nature oats are certified by GFCO so I decided to see if they had a threashold for gluten-free and here's what the GFCO website says:

Does gluten-free certification guarantee that a product is gluten-free?

The mark assures that the product contains less than 10 ppm gluten (5 ppm gliadin) and similar proteins from rye and barley as measured by using testing methods that are accepted for gluten testing by analytical associations such as the Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC), testing researchers and other such agencies. There is no testing method available that measures to zero.

As I said earlier I am extremely sensitive to gluten. Rice Dream at 20 PPM is enough to give me a full blown gluten reaction so it is very possible that I reacted to traces of gluten from other sources in the oats and not the oats.


---------------------------------

MP - celiac for 10 years

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

So where would one find the certified gluten-free oats? Are these the oats that gluten-free folks decided to harvest on their own dedicated land, or has that not happened yet?

I can't tell if there is a consensus on this board about whether certified, dedicated field oats might be okay - it seems like most of the problem with oats is how impossible it is to avoid contamination.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

So where would one find the certified gluten-free oats?

Bob's Red Mill

Glutenfreeoats.com

Gifts Of Nature

Creamhill Estates


-Colleen

Dx 8/05 via bloodwork and biopsy (total villous atrophy)

13-year old son Dx 11/05 via bloodwork and biopsy

Daughters (16 and 5) have tested negative via bloodwork

A woman is like a tea bag - you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water. - Eleanor Roosevelt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter



Join eNewsletter