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Idiote Savante Goddess

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Saw the allergist yesterday. She agrees that I could have had a false negative response to the bloodwork bc of my wheat allergy, so I'll do my genetic testing as soon as I know how much BlueCross-Blue Shield will cover (or perhaps, more correctly, won't cover).

The bad news is that the Elavil the neuro prescribed for my migraines has made me manic. They don't know if it will resolve on its own now that I'm no longer taking it, or if I'll continue to have manic episodes.

What do all those boring neurologically typical people do for fun?

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Saw the allergist yesterday. She agrees that I could have had a false negative response to the bloodwork bc of my wheat allergy, so I'll do my genetic testing as soon as I know how much BlueCross-Blue Shield will cover (or perhaps, more correctly, won't cover).

The bad news is that the Elavil the neuro prescribed for my migraines has made me manic. They don't know if it will resolve on its own now that I'm no longer taking it, or if I'll continue to have manic episodes.

What do all those boring neurologically typical people do for fun?

Sounds like your allergist is pretty savvy. Hopefully she told you that whether or not your eating gluten will not effect the gene test.

I am not surprised by the reaction you had to the Elavil, many of us have bad effects on psychotropic meds. My migraines were controlled completely by the gluten-free diet. Have you started it yet? Hopefully between time and the diet the manic episodes will resolve. Make sure that you are taking a sublingual B12 in addition to your other vitamins it will help the brain and nerves heal.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Hopefully she told you that whether or not your eating gluten will not effect the gene test.

I don't understand this sentence. Anyway, nothing you eat will effect your gene tests, it would only effect your bloodwork or biopsies.

I agree that your migraines as well as the manic symptoms might both resolve on a gluten-free diet.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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Genetic testing will not tell you whether you have Celiac Disease. It will only tell you if the have the genetic make up for the disease. A huge portion of the population carry the genes for Celiac - most will never develop the disease. A genetic test can, however, rule out Celiac.

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A genetic test can, however, rule out Celiac.

No, not so. There are documented cases of people having full-blown celiac disease with completely flattened villi who don't have the 'official' celiac disease genes.

Scientists have acknowledged that it is likely not all of the celiac disease genes have been found yet.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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I don't understand this sentence. Anyway, nothing you eat will effect your gene tests, it would only effect your bloodwork or biopsies.

I agree that your migraines as well as the manic symptoms might both resolve on a gluten-free diet.

I guess I worded that badly, what it means is that the gene test is not effected if you are not eating gluten. I didn't want the poster to think she has to do a challenge if already gluten free.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Well, I've been off the Elavil for almost two weeks -- I feel energetic, but not manic -- the issue is the manic mood made me EXTREMELY irritable -- I got a verbal reprimand at work. However, I've also noticed that espresso, which never made me jittery before, now makes me jittery. So, I'll just have to ride it out and see what happens.

Yes, the allergist knows I can't do a gluten challenge and that I don't need to eat wheat for the gene test. I do understand that the gene test will show only a propensity toward gluten intolerance or celiac, not the disease itself.

The sublingual B-12 sounds interesting -- is it yeast-based? I have a yeast allergy as well.

I'm gearing up to go gluten-free next payday. I'm already gluten-light -- it'll just mean no hot barley cereal when the weather gets cold, no Ry-Krisp w/peanut butter for lunch. I'm allergic to rice as well, but there's always corn and quinoa and gluten-free oats.

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No, not so. There are documented cases of people having full-blown celiac disease with completely flattened villi who don't have the 'official' celiac disease genes.

Scientists have acknowledged that it is likely not all of the celiac disease genes have been found yet.

I have full blown celiac disease (GI symptoms, skin issues, neurological symptoms) and don't have the "official" celiac disease genes. I see the reasoning to want to test but the only real test is to eliminate gluten from your diet. If that works, stick with it. Some people on this board have additional food intolerances - I don't know if those work in a similar way to gluten, but it might be worth trying out different eliminations.

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