Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

MySuicidalTurtle

I Thought Aunt Jemima Was Gluten-free.

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I won't be buying their products anymore. Here is the e-mail they sent me when I asked about gluten-free and vegan products:

Kristina:

Thanks for asking about vegan and gluten free products. Unfortunately, we don't have any products that are considered gluten-free, nor do we maintain a list of vegan products (since formulas often change).

Here's why we can't recommend any of our products to be gluten-free:

*Our grains come from suppliers that are also suppliers of wheat, rye, and barley

*Due to the way our suppliers might have handled the grain, cross contact may have occurred before it even reached our plants.

Kristina, we're sorry to disappoint you and appreciate your interest in our products. For more information on gluten and gluten intolerance, we invite you to visit www.celiac.org.

Brandon

Quaker Consumer Response

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, at least they were honest, accurate, and even knew to point you to a celiac website...

I know a lot of people love Aunt Jemima syrup, but it's so full of disgusting chemicals anyway, not to mention high fructose corn syrup. Real maple syrup is SO much better for you (and I think it tastes better, too). Costco sells it very inexpensively.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I called them they told me that the only product they considered gluten free was their syrups. Once the bottle is gone I planned on switching to pure maple syrup, but I think I'll do so now.

That being said, many manufacturers most likely have this issue and we eat their foods all the time. :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kristina,

The lawyers have taken over. :ph34r:

I won't be buying their products anymore. Here is the e-mail they sent me when I asked about gluten-free and vegan products:

Kristina:

Thanks for asking about vegan and gluten free products. Unfortunately, we don't have any products that are considered gluten-free, nor do we maintain a list of vegan products (since formulas often change).

Here's why we can't recommend any of our products to be gluten-free:

*Our grains come from suppliers that are also suppliers of wheat, rye, and barley

*Due to the way our suppliers might have handled the grain, cross contact may have occurred before it even reached our plants.

Kristina, we're sorry to disappoint you and appreciate your interest in our products. For more information on gluten and gluten intolerance, we invite you to visit www.celiac.org.

Brandon

Quaker Consumer Response

Seriously, more and more companies are refusing to say that any of their products are gluten-free (or vegan, for that matter) because they do not produce every single ingredient themselves, and the legal department will not let them expose themselves to a liability suit based on contamination by a third-party supplier. In today's society, dubious lawsuits occur every day, and wise companies go to lengths to protect themselves. Those of us looking for useful, practical information are the losers when these all-too-common cover-your-ass statements get in the way of the truth.

They won't make a guarantee, and I understand why. They don't keep a list, because formulas change.

I do have concerns about cross-contamination in Quaker's products, since their oats have been tested and shown to have wheat in them. However, I think that their reply to you is driven by legal concerns and I don't blame them for covering their butts.

These are just my thoughts; others may have different ideas. <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I called them just recently about Aunt Jemima syrup because this issue came up on our local list serve. They told me the ingredient they are concerned about is the high fructose corn syrup. They can't guarantee that the corn wasn't processed in the same place as a gluten grain. That is too far removed for me to make my daughter give up her favorite syrup at this time. If I have to start hunting down hidden gluten, I will consider it then.

Personally I think high fructose corn syrup should be avoided but I haven't had the heart to put my foot down for my daughter who has already given up gluten, casein, and most soy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I called them just recently about Aunt Jemima syrup because this issue came up on our local list serve. They told me the ingredient they are concerned about is the high fructose corn syrup. They can't guarantee that the corn wasn't processed in the same place as a gluten grain. That is too far removed for me to make my daughter give up her favorite syrup at this time. If I have to start hunting down hidden gluten, I will consider it then.

Personally I think high fructose corn syrup should be avoided but I haven't had the heart to put my foot down for my daughter who has already given up gluten, casein, and most soy.

I would wash out the bottle as soon as it is empty (ooops a spill :rolleyes: ) and then fill it from a bottle of pure maple syrup. Bet she won't know the difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would wash out the bottle as soon as it is empty (ooops a spill :rolleyes: ) and then fill it from a bottle of pure maple syrup. Bet she won't know the difference.

I was going to suggest this, too! You could even add a bit of the pure maple to it before it's all the way empty (it is a little different-tasting from high-fructose corn syrup).

Think about it--it tastes good because of the artificial maple flavor, which is a fairly close approximation of real maple flavor, close enough to be recognizable, anyway. But we want more and more of it because of the darn high fructose corn syrup, which has been proven to be addictive. That's the whole reason they use it. And if you are very, very observant, you will notice a chemical aftertaste--but it makes you thirsty, so you immediately drink something to wash it down, right?

The way I see it, it's just another poison. Why would you have any concerns about your daughter giving up a poison that is manufactured to look and taste like a real product that is readily available? (The wicked witch from Snow White comes to mind here with her poisoned apple....)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to buy their syrup but stopped after I was diagnosed because of the labeling. I seem to remember something called "natural flavorings" or something like that on the label, and I've learned the hard way that secondary ingredients "natural flavors" and "colorings" can be gluten filled, particularly in brown colored liquids. Wheat and barley can be useful apparently in creating brown colorings in food items.

So I buy pure maple syrup. I found the real stuff to be sweeter than the fake stuff, LOL. So who knows, your daughter may like the real stuff even more.

Violet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I will try to switch out the syrup without telling her. There is a different taste to real maple syrup. I switched because of concerns over HFCS but did have to get used to it. Now, I can't stand the fake syrup.

I haven't made her switch because in most people's eyes (not here) I am one of those health food nuts. I was never this way until I saw what a difference a little bit of gluten makes. Now I have trouble believing those chemicals they put in food aren't having an effect. I've just been hesitant to impose this on her when most of the world doesn't see it that way. She still eats much better food than most people just by being gluten-free/CF and having to eat at home and have home-made treats all the time. When I did try insisting she eat the real syrup, she just didn't eat pancakes any more. She is a very picky eater, so this just made it more difficult.

We have about 1/2 bottle left of the Aunt Jemima. I'm going to fill it up with real maple syrup and see what happens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I haven't made her switch because in most people's eyes (not here) I am one of those health food nuts.

Hee hee--when I was little, my mom REFUSED to buy anything but pure maple. Back then, we didn't know anything about HFCS, but she took one look at the list of chemicals on the labels and saw "cancer." in her mind's eye. I thought she was a bit wacko, but, hey, she turned out to be right all along! Imagine that...

She also made us eat stone-ground whole wheat bread for lunch instead of Wonder bread like what everyone else brought to school. And she never served bread or pasta for dinner, and served eggs for breakfast, not toast or cereal. And she knew nothing about gluten.

It wasn't until decades later that I started to eat pasta for dinner, make homemade bread, and make pancakes for breakfast--and only then did I begin to have symptoms. She probably saved me from all kinds of serious and irreparable gluten damage.

I say, long live health food nut moms!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aunt Jamima makes pancake mixes and other products that contain wheat flour. There's no flour in syrup.

I never cared much for real maple syrup, it's too thin, gets yucky easily, and is expensive, a moot point now that there are far fewer opportunities to even use syrup. I recommend Griffin's Original Syrup, it's the only syrup I've ever found that does NOT contain HFCS. It's made from sugar syrup and corn syrup. I use both real maple syrup and Griffin's. Please note, Griffin's Waffle or Pancake syrup does contain HFCS. Griffin's is in Muskogee, Oklahoma, but it's available in North Texas.

The only problem I have with HFCS is it tastes flat.

best regards, lm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where in North Texas do you get Griffin's syrup? We are going to Dallas in a few weeks so if my syrup substitution experiment is a failure, I may get some of that. Is it in the regular grocery stores?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried making the Aunt Jemima syrup half maple syrup and half Aunt Jemima. My daughter took 2 bites and said it didn't taste like "regular" syrup. I asked her what it tasted like and she said "real maple syrup". When she realized what had happened, she left the table without eating. So much for that experiment.

I think my husband likes Aunt Jemima better, too, so I probably wouldn't be able to get it out of the house anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Where in North Texas do you get Griffin's syrup? We are going to Dallas in a few weeks so if my syrup substitution experiment is a failure, I may get some of that. Is it in the regular grocery stores?

Our Walmart doesn't carry it, although they stock a lot of other brands I've never heard of. Best I remember, I've eaten it my whole life. Albertsons and Brookshires carry it for sure. I'd be willing to bet Kroger and Tom Thumb do also.

I've made quite an effort to read ingredient labels on syrups, and as far as I know Griffin's ORIGINAL is the only one without HFCS. If anyone knows of another I'd be interested in hearing about it.

best regards, lm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When I called them they told me that the only product they considered gluten free was their syrups. Once the bottle is gone I planned on switching to pure maple syrup, but I think I'll do so now.

That being said, many manufacturers most likely have this issue and we eat their foods all the time. :unsure:

A bit off topic but...Jenny, I was excited to see in your signature that your son did not have a biopsy done either! We thought we were the only people on earth who didn't get their child a biopsy. Our Conor had two positive results from two different labs and we just can't understand why a biopsy is needed other than for the surgery happy gastroenterologist we had to be able to put an "official" diagnosis on his chart!

Tracey

mom to 6 yr old son with 2 positive blood tests, Down syndrome and possible Autism

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would wash out the bottle as soon as it is empty (ooops a spill :rolleyes: ) and then fill it from a bottle of pure maple syrup. Bet she won't know the difference.

I've tried that with my DS who just turned 14. Didn't work.

We've been using the dark Agave with not as much griping. He doesn't like the like pure Maple Syrup either. I bought Log Cabin the other day that is a little mislabeled saying now it doesn't contain high fructose corn syrup, but when you look at the ingredients, it still says corn syrup. Bad--just not as bad. We only eat pancakes every other Sunday, so I only have to listen to his complaints every 2 wks. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Top Posters +

  • Upcoming Events

    • March 24, 2019 Until March 27, 2019
      0  
      NEW ORLEANS GOURMET GLUTEN-FREE mini GETAWAY    March 24 ~ 27, 2019   We have arranged a fun and Gluten-free food filled mini in the city known for it's food and fun.  We have arranged to eat many of the famous dishes that aren't usually Gluten-free at a few of the World Renown restaurants.   Staying at the Royal Sonesta Hotel on Bourbon Street in the center of the French Quarter, you'll be able to enjoy the ambiance of the city at all hours.   Our itinerary will include a Luxury Coach tour of the city and surrounding area - Admission to The National World War II Museum, including the Tom Hanks" 4D film "Beyond All Boundaries" - an exciting Airboat ride and tour through the Bayou.      This it the 3rd time we have visited New Orleans and it has always been well attended, so join us even if you've been there before.  Check out our website for the complete itinerary and cost.    Due to contractual obligations we must have 20 participants by October 31, 2018 to make this a go.      If you have any questions just give us a call at 410-939-3218.  Bob & Ruth info@bobandruths.com (410) 939-3218
    • March 27, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
      0  
       
       
       
      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • March 30, 2019 Until March 31, 2019
      0  
      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      86,812
    • Most Online
      4,125

    Newest Member
    T Jenry
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      112,069
    • Total Posts
      956,727
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Forum Discussions

    Been doing it for a week now, I am trying doctors best and got a deal on some from Vitacost both in capsule form to avoid the crap they put in the other forms I found it available. I am actually using both one in the morning one in the afternoon. Might not work for everyone but I am seeing why many bodybuilders swear by it in the gym. I just figured if it might help people that get muscle fatigue easily with daily life. 
    For what it's worth, I've noticed that if it's just iodine I will not get any other symptoms. In addition to the rash, I typically get GI symptoms, fatigue, and sometimes joint swelling when I ingest gluten. I don't typically eat seafood or stuff with lots of iodized salt, but sometimes I do on special occasions knowing that there will be some relatively minor consequences. Typically this is because I am traveling - canned tuna, salty snacks, jerky etc. are often the only nutritionally bala
While a Celiac reaction requires actual consumption of gluten, I take no risks.  Sunscreen might melt into my mouth a long bike trip or I could bite a nail.   I use CeraVe lotion for my face.  In winter, I use their heavier cream.  I also use the Equate “CeraVe” version by Walmart which is made in Canada.  I use a lot of sunscreen.  I buy Equate which does not contain gluten, is recommended by Consumer reports and is inexpensive.  Do not use CeraVe sunscreen.  For some reason they changed t
  • Blog Entries

  • ×
    ×
    • Create New...