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Nuala

Positive Antigliadin Ab After 6 Weels Of gluten-free- Full Celiac Panel?

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I have a positive result Gliadin AB (AGA) following a saliva test: 31 [positive > 15U/ml]. This result came after about 6 weeks of a gluten-free diet ( I was glutened along the way numerous times)

I had gone on a gluten-free diet at my drs advice, and after researching the connection between celiac and thyroid disease. I am hypothyroid [diagnosed 2 years, sick for 10+, undiagnosed :( }

I am of Irish heritage and many in my family have autoimmune disorders (though they don't understand the significance] - thyroid disease, pernicious anemia, fibromyalgia, crohns, PFAPA (period fever) and likely more.

So, given this I decided to try gluten-free. A felt a bit better - gas, bloating and constipation improved. I was actually hoping for a significant, life-changing shift, but did not really feel it.

The quesiton is, should I go for the full celicac panel? I am really interested in getting a diagnosis - tho I know sometimes, it may not even be possible with a SB biopsy, and the gluten challenge is all that counts sometimes.

My family has had difficulty in understanding my thyroid condition as it relates to my chronic fatigue and severe mood disorders - anxiety and depression. I know there is a connection, since I have improved so greatly following treatment. But, I have high glucose and have multiple deficiencies (b12, iron, total protein and likely more - had no other tests) - which point toward malabsorption.

I told my sister about the AGA and her first response was "there are a lot of fales positives". So, I know I am in for the social stigma of wanting to be "different" or a "pain" but eating a gluten-free diet. I would like for my own satisfaction and to convince my family my gluten-free diet is justified, to be formally diagnosed.

However, I am concerned about having to eat gluten again in order to be tested.

Any advice? :)

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

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"I told my sister about the AGA and her first response was "there are a lot of fales positives". So, I know I am in for the social stigma of wanting to be "different" or a "pain" but eating a gluten-free diet. I would like for my own satisfaction and to convince my family my gluten-free diet is justified, to be formally diagnosed."

Your sister is wrong. There are lots of false negatives with celiac testing but false positives are virually never heard of. If your antibody levels were elevated even after 6 weeks of being gluten free, with a few slips, they were most likely even more in the positive levels before.

Sometimes we have to do what we know we have to do regardless of what our family thinks. There is a possibility you will never show up positive with testing and could do a lot of damage to yourself be repeatedly doing challenges. If you want to have a positive biopsy or blood work you would need to be eating gluten for at least 3 months, how sick is that going to make you? Is it worth it?

There may be another way to prove to your family that this is a real issue, just go gluten free, don't talk about it a lot and let them see the difference in you for themselves after a few months. When they realize how well you are doing it will be hard for them to deny your need for the diet.

There may be another factor here to their resistance, denial. Celiac runs in families, if you have a problem that means that others do also. Many can not imagine living in a world without gluten, perhaps that is contributing to their attitudes. Again your success and recovery of your health and happiness will do a great deal to change their minds.

You need to do what is best for you.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Thanks for bringing me to my senses. I was only in two minds about it because of the family-factor. I am satisfied with the result of the test, and deep down I know I don't need any further tests, and I certainly do not need to put myself months behind in the healing process by resuming a gluten-filled diet.

Yes, I'll have to be quiet about it, since they seem to be no more sympathetic or tolerant about the AGA than with my thyroid diagnosis and struggle to get proper treatment. I gave them all the help I can by relaying the information and it was soundly rejected. Another family member commented that going gluten-free shouldn't be too hard!!! :angry:

My sister is in the nutrition field, I suspect she was referring to the lack of sensitivity of the AGA. Who knows? But, I did, in the course of my reading about the test, see that false positives are uncommon. I saw the article on this forum by Scott Adams where he says that a positive result means a 97% probability the patient has celiac.

Thanks again for the pep talk. I just needed some support from the "choir" so to speak. After, all that is why we are all here!

I guess I should specify that it was the IGA anti-gliadin AB, for those of you who may read this post, as I omitted it i my earlier posting. :lol:

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