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C'smum

Origin Of Celiacs?

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I reside in Ontario but grew up with my family in England.My family believed themselves to be true English.Recently we found out that we are of Irish decent through my fathers side the same side that has passed on Celiacs to me.There is some belief that Celiacs originate from Ireland.Whats your background?

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Well I AM of Irish descent, but celiac can happen to ppl of any race.

Of course, the chances are higher for those of western euro blood - or is it northwestern?

P.S. It's Celiac, not Celiacs.


>>>>>>> tom <<<<<<<

Celiac 1st diagnosed as a toddler, in the 60s. Docs then, between bloodletting & leech-tending, said "he'll grow out of it" & I was back on gluten & mostly fine for 30yrs.

Gluten-free since 12-03

Dairy-free since 10-04

Soy-free since 5-07

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I reside in Ontario but grew up with my family in England.My family believed themselves to be true English.Recently we found out that we are of Irish decent through my fathers side the same side that has passed on Celiacs to me.There is some belief that Celiacs originate from Ireland.Whats your background?

Hi 'C's mum',

Well My father was English, my mother was Irish, I was born in Scotland

I married a German girl who's brother was also Coeliac/Celiac so where do you go from there!

.

Ireland is supposed to have the highest prevalance of Coeliac Disease in the world,

maybe they should have stayed off the bread and stuck to the Potatoes! :lol:

.

My profile and the blog on My Web Space gives all my background details.

.

I don't think it's down to our forefarthers home country or race,

I believe if you have the pre-disposition to Celiac it's not a matter of How but When!.

.

There's a lot said about introducing babies to 'wheat' too early (ie. before 6 months)

.

Mothers unknowingly giving their babies their first taste of 'Gluten'

by either blending regular food for baby without realising that the 'gravy or sauce'

may have used 'wheat' flour to thicken it, or maybe when they are 'teething' giving them

a 'Crust ' of bread to chew on?.

Let's face it most people on this forum have Celiac, it's not going to go away,

so we have to do the best we can and every little bit of help and comfort goes a long way!

.

I'm kinda getting off-topic here so I leave it at that.

.

Best Regards,

David


Chronically Ill and lost 56lbs in 3 Months Prior to Diagnosis.

Diagnosed in Nov 2005 after Biopsy and Blood Tests

Cannot tolerate Codex Wheat Starch.

Self Taught Baker.

Bake everything from scratch using naturally gluten-free ingredients.

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I'm Italian on both sides :)


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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I don't think it's down to our forefarthers home country or race,

I believe if you have the pre-disposition to Celiac it's not a matter of How but When!.

Pretty much true.... however Americans always seem to think there is such a thing as Irish or German etc. when most Europeans realise they are all mixed up.

I think it goes back to when their family emigrated and they presume they must have a 100% pure blood line prior to that date or something??? Most of the 'incidence' differences are just down to the fact once it becomes prevalent more people are tested and doctors become more aware. Italy has a fairly consistent 1:200 incidence despite the huge genetic differences between North and South. (the only real genetic link being the Scandanavian one from the Lomards and Normans)...

Its funny for us Eurpeans to think that someone with blond hair and blue eyes from Lombardy is genetically closer to someone with very dark skin and afro hair from Sicily... not to mention Italy didn't exist as a country until Garibaldi in 1878... or that a Hindi family living in Rome (perhaps for over 2000 yrs) are somehow closer than a Austrian to some Italian genotype???


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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Irish, Scottish & Dutch (and a little English -- I guess that's why I sometimes argue with myself :lol: )


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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Irish, Scottish & Dutch (and a little English -- I guess that's why I sometimes argue with myself :lol: )

:lol:

We're a big mix, too. German, English, Native American, French Canadian- does that count? :lol::P


-Sarah

--Son, Lucas, age 7. Gluten-free since May 2007

--Son, Ezra, age 5. Gluten-free 10/13/07. Bipolar tendencies, massively improved on gluten-free diet! He's also allergic to a jillion antibiotics.

--My mother has Celiac Disease, dx'ed by Positive Blood Tests and Biopsy. Diagnosed Sarcoidosis 6/08.

--Myself, Gluten-free since 8/07

Time heals all hurt of heart... but time must be won.

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Irish descent on Dad's side, English on Mum's


Diagnosed Eczema 1964 aged 16 but with what I know now from research am sure it was Dermatitis Herpetiformis

Diagnosed Irritable Bowel Syndrome 1969 at age 21 but had it from age of 12 many painful episodes over the years( was probably Coeliac all along)

Diagnosed Hashimoto's Disease/Hypothyroid November 1994

Low B12 November 2006

Low B12 (still!) July 2007 Docs are happy with results just above low end of normal..*sigh*....still need to resolve it

Gluten free since October 2006 after failing gluten challenge

Diagnosed Hiatus Hernia and Los Angeles Grade A reflux via endoscopy October 2007

Diagnosed with Coeliac Disease via same endoscopy / biopsy October 2007 (took them long enough!) despite being gluten-free damage still evident although had been taking iron tablets for iron deficiency without realizing they contained gluten. Subsequent blood tests show :Positive Anti-Gliadin IgA EIA antibodies, Positive Endomysial antibodies ,Positive tTG IgA antibodies of 300 ("normal" range 0-15)

Auto-immune disease goes back at least 5 generations in my family (and counting) Mainly Type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis.

Number 1 Son has Type 1 diabetes ..diagnosed March 2007 at age 31, number 2 son aged 24 is A/I disease free so far ,daughter has lichen planus ( similar to psoriasis) diagnosed 2003 at age 17 am now wondering if it is DH but with flippancy of the young she won't get any testing done

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I am thinking that it doesn't really matter where you come from anymore. I think it may be more prevalent in certain areas, but is being found in outer areas too. I read celiac is now found in some of the areas where we supply rice and flours to those who do not normally have these foods and now they are developing the disease too. I think at first we thought it was more Irish and Greeks maybe, only because they are the leaders in finding the disease. The United States was way behind other countries in diagnosing celiac disease.

When my group, the Suffolk County Celiac Support Group, from Long Island, NY, had their vendor fair, the largest vendor fair ever held anywhere, there were people there from all walks of life. I talked to so many different nationalities, I was so surprised. We come from everywhere, we are all colors, we speak all languages, we are all heights, we have all different hair colors, long hair, short hair, bald, we are in wheelchairs, some of us are very young, some are very old, and everywhere inbetween.

My background is German, English, American, and maybe some Irish. My mom is a hot tempered redhead!!!

We all have gluten in common. We want it out of our lives. Whether we are celiac, gluten intolerant, or gluten sensititive, we want gluten freedom.


Deb

Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

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I am English and Irish with a touch of French Canadian and First Nations.


~Ill for 5 years with progressive symptoms: anxiety, brain fog, joint pain, "D", and the noisiest stomach you've ever heard, and a lovely itchy rash on my buttocks, scalp, and sometimes thighs. ~ Family history of Celiac disease (Uncle, cousins, grandmother) ~ Blood work showed some antibodies but not enough to be dx celiac ~ Dq7 & Dq4. ~ I can't call myself Celiac but I know gluten is bad for my body.

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I have Irish, English, German, American Native can't remember the tribe, and of course Texan

donna


Fecal Antigliadin IgA 21 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 13 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score <300 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 12 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0501

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (Subtype 5,5)

You can teach an old dog new tricks!!!

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Maternal: english (mostly)

Paternal: French Candian and Irish

There's a lot said about introducing babies to 'wheat' too early (ie. before 6 months)

They are now says also for peanuts not to let your child have this for 3 years!


Just my .00000002 cents worth

If I knew what I was doing years ago I would have half a clue today!

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I think im the oddball in this group, im spanish and little indian.

my step-son is

german, polish, spanish and a something else, i cant think right now.

paul


gluten, casein and soy free

on low carb/low sugar diet

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Irish, English, Scottish, and my dad says a little bit of native american...but im not so sure about that.

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I'd recommend the book "Guns, Germs and Steel". It's super super long, but there's a great chapter about the beginnings of agriculture and which grains were "chosen" to domesticate. It gives a lot of insight into gluten and which ethnic groups are most affected by celiac even though gluten is never specifically mentioned.

Agriculture began in the fertile crescent/Mesopotamia region. The people who are descended from this area have less issues with gluten because they've had more generations to develop the ability to digest gluten. Places where these grains were more recently introduced like Ireland have higher incidences of celiac.

Grains with bigger seeds were the ones that were developed for agriculture. There's some interesting stuff about genetics here - in the wild a desirable trait is grains that drop off the stalk so the seeds disperse. In agriculture, seeds that remain on the stalk are the ones that are picked and planted the next year so domestic grain is not dramatically different than the stuff found in the wild. Wild wheat is also much lower in gluten content, so the recent high-gluten wheats may have added to the incidence of celiac.

Oh, and I'm English by the way :)


Gluten-Free since September 15, 2005.

Peanut-Free since July 2006.

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