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holdthegluten

Gluten Free,dairy Free,sugar Free,soy Free

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What are some good cookbooks for a diet as restricted as mine. I am a 27 yr old male with little cooking experience. Thanks Guys


28 yr old Male

Diagnosed Celiac in February 2007

Gluten-free/Casein Free

HLA DQ 2,3 Subtype (2,8) I have both celiac genes!

Married

1 child 9 months- Levi

Yeast/Bacteria overgrowth

" CHANGE THE WAY YOU LOOK AT THINGS AND THE THINGS YOU LOOK AT CHANGE"

Wayne Dyer

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You would probably do well to browse through the local bookstore. Even if you can't find a cookbook solely dedicated to the foods you can have, you might find one with a number of recipes that look good to you and within your ability. In particular, check out the cookbooks designed for students, beginning cooks, or those with little time.

Another possibility is to go with allergy cookbooks. I have two: Food Allergy Survival Guide and Allergy Cuisine. However, I generally just pick out the recipes I can have from my other books, making substitutions if possible. I've only made a couple things from the first book and nothing from the second yet, though, so I don't know if I can give a ringing endorsement :lol: You can look at reviews at Lame Advertisement.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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What your best bet would be is cooking lessons from a good chef (note-- not a cook. This is where it is better to go for a Gordon Ramsey than a Rachel Ray). They know their ingredients inside and out and can help find something that you can eat that will keep you healthy. Some places to find these are by looking for a culinary school in the area and then calling their information office to see if any of the professors give private lessons or specialize in food allergies.


Symptoms on and off my whole life

Major symptoms starting 2005

Zero blood antibodies

Gluten free with positive dietary response since April 2007

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What are some good cookbooks for a diet as restricted as mine. I am a 27 yr old male with little cooking experience. Thanks Guys

Hi holdthegluten - That is a beautiful baby - is it yours?

For cookbooks I've read good things about these; (excerpt from the www.seattletimes.com)

"Allergy-Free Cookbook: No Eggs, No Dairy, No Nuts, No Gluten" (DK Publishing, $25) by Alice Sherwood is an indispensable guide for anyone learning to live with allergies. It's full of recipes and useful tips for shopping and traveling. But it's the chart for substituting ingredients that will transform your kitchen and cooking.

"Gluten-Free, Sugar-Free Cooking: Over 200 Delicious Recipes to Help You Live a Healthier, Allergy-Free Life" (Marlowe & Company, $16.95), written by Gig Harbor resident Susan O'Brien, is a real cook's book. O'Brien's creative recipes make eating healthfully both easy and enjoyable.

Full article: http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/...n+free+cookbook

For an easy resource, try the blog written by the Gluten free Goddess- Karina, who has celiac and many more allergies than just dairy and soy. Her blog is fun (well, for me anyway) but she takes some of the stress and worry out of cooking if you're new to it.

http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/

Good luck!

~Laura


Diagnosed by biopsy 2/12/07. Negative blood tests. Gluten-free (except for accidents) since 2/15/07. DQ2.5 (HLA DQA1*05:DQB1*0201)

Son, age 18, previously delayed growth 3rd percentile weight, 25th percentile height (5'3" at age 15). Negative blood work. Endoscopy declined. Enterolab positive 3/12/08. Gene results: HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201 HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0503 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1(Subtype 2,5) Went gluten-free, casein-free 3/15/08. Now 6'2" (Over six feet!) and doing great.

"Great difficulties may be surmounted by patience and perseverance." Abigail Adams (1744-1818) 2nd First Lady of the United States

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Another book would be: Cooking Free, by Carol Fenster, PhD. This book has 200 recipes for people with multiple food allergies including alternatives to gluten,dairy,and sugar.

I've purchased most of my books used on-line thru Amazon. Some of the new books are shipped free and the price is very reasonable.

Your local library may also have many allergy type cookbooks. You would have to browse thru them and pick which recipes would work for you using substitutes.

Also, google dairy,gluten,soy,etc. free and check out the results. Many free recipes on line. recipes and recipes

Narrow your search on these website by using the words gluten free, etc.

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my nutritionist published a book i really like - it is mostly gluten, dairy, soy free - I can't verify right now because I loaned it to my parents. His website is "wholelifenutrition.net". He has some sample recipies on his site.

Good luck.

Oh yeah, also, raw food cookbooks can be helpful that way - though they like to include raw soy sauce, it can be avoided quite easily. And any time they call for soaked oat groats, you can use soaked buckwheat groats. You have to be willing to eat raw, though. (I have been and it's going very well so far.) Ani Phyo's cookbook is great, and Raw Food Real Life is pretty good too. Ani's is simpler.

Good luck.

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I would suggest "Cooking Free", too. My husband bought it for me last Christmas--it's very good :)


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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