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mmcdaniels

Bread Machine

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Hi. We are very new to Gluten-free living. My son was dx celiac last week. My mother lent me her bread machine to see if I could get my son to eat any of the homemade gluten-free breads before I bought a new bread machine. My mother is an immaculate housekeeper and really cleans things well. How high is the risk of cross contamination if I use her bread machine? I would also appreciated any advice concorned good bread recipes or mixes. So far I've only tried a store-bought tapioca bread.

Thanks,

Marsha

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By using a used bread machine you run the strong risk of CC. There is probably gluten crumbs still lurking in there and they may be invisible but it is not worth the risk...I would spring for a new one.


~~~~Gluten Free since 9/2004~~~~~~

Friends may come and go but Sillies are Forever!!!!!!!

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I would think it unwise to use a used bread machine. The risk would be too great for cross contamination.

The best of the best bread recepies is on this site. It's "Lorka's Bread Recipe". I have not tried it, but it gets rave reviews from many here.

Here are a few to look at:

https://www.celiac.com/categories/Gluten%25...-Bread-Recipes/


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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I think it would be impossible to clean a bread machine well enough to avoid cross contamination. If you think about it, you add all the ingredients to the pan and press go. The paddle starts to turn and mix things. When that happens, some of the flour puffs up inside the bread machine and settles on all the inside surfaces. There is a good possibility that some of the gluten flour particles could find their way into your gluten-free loaf. I don't think you could wipe it out well enough without ruining the machine. Also, there is the place where the paddle hooks into the pan. There are all kinds or nooks and crannies for gluten molecules to hide. It really takes very little to make someone who is gluten intollerant sick. It think it is quite easy to make gluten-free bread with a kitchenaid mixer and the regular oven.

Here is a link to my favorite bread recipe. Don't be intimidated by the long list of ingredients. I mix up all the dry ingredients several batches at a time in guart-sized zipper baggies. Thean all I have to do is dump one in, add the wet stuff and go.

Good luck with your bread!


-Colleen

Dx 8/05 via bloodwork and biopsy (total villous atrophy)

13-year old son Dx 11/05 via bloodwork and biopsy

Daughters (16 and 5) have tested negative via bloodwork

A woman is like a tea bag - you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water. - Eleanor Roosevelt

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I do use one. What I do is thoroughly clean all the inside surfaces everywhere. I take a little brush and scrub really well all the little places.

It isn't ideal, but it has been okay for me so far.


4/2007 Positive IGA, TTG Enterolab results, with severe malabsorption: Two DQ2 celiac genes--highest possible risk.

gluten-free since 4/22/07; SF since 7/07; 3/08 & 7/08 high sugar levels in stool (i.e. cannot break down carbs) digestive enzymes for carbs didn't help; 7/18/08 started SCD as prescribed by my physician (MD).

10/2000 dx LYME disease; 2008 clinical dx CELIAC; Other: hypothyroid, allergies, dupuytrens, high mercury levels

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