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struggling

Another Seeking Help With Test Reslts

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HI. I know you guys get this all the time and I previously searched the enterolab site but I just wanted to hear what anyone on the board had to say as you were all so hepful and supportive when I posted pre-test. So what I am seeing in my results (below) is that

1) My body is producing antibodies to gluten. What is the difference between the elevated Antiglidian IgA and the Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA? Would both be lower had I been off gluten longer? (sans gluten only about 2-3 weeks when this was taken)

2) My absorptions levels are less then ideal so this does mean there is some sort of damage to the intestines, correct? I have had major issues in the past two years with iron absorption and the development of osteopenia so I am not suprised but I have not lost any weight, in fact I gained weight due to having to stop running from a running related fracture in my hip (i'm 23). Can you have malabsorption without weight loss?

3) I don't have celiac genes but do have one gluten sensitivity gene so there is no doubt that with my subsiding of symptoms coinciding with the elimination of gluten was because that gene was expressing itself, however since I don't have the celiac genes I don't have or would never develop celiac? Not that the answer to this would change anything but I think I am just confused by what the difference is between gluten sensitivity and celiac?

In advance thanks so much for any clarity you can offer.

A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 21 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 13 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 1189 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 13 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0602

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0402

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,4 (Subtype 6,4)

Interpretation of Fecal Antigliadin IgA: Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

Interpretation of Fecal Antitissue Transglutam inase IgA: You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: A fecal fat score greater than or equal to 300 Units indicates there is an increased amount of dietary fat in the stool which usually is due to gluten-induced small intestinal malabsorption/damage when associated with gluten sensitivity. Values between 300-600 Units are mild elevations, 600-1000 Units moderate elevations, and values greater than 1000 Units are severe elevations. Any elevated fecal fat value should be rechecked in one year after treatment to ensure that it does not persist because chronic fat malabsorption is associated with osteoporosis among other nutritional deficiency syndromes.

Interpretation of Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: Although you do not possess one of the main genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have one copy of a gene that predi sposes to gluten sensitivity (DQ1 or DQ3 not subtype 8). Having one of these genes means that each of your offspring has a 50% chance of receiving this gene from you, and at least one of your parents passed it to you.

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Well I dont have the cleiac gene but i do have celiac, i have an high ttg in my celiac panel. There are still genes out there they have not recognized as main celiac genes yet.

I would look into candida, lyme or parasites that are causing ur high malabsorption scores. These can make it hard to absorb minerals and cause malabsorption.

I will add more when my hands defrost i was out ice skating lol

paula


gluten, casein and soy free

on low carb/low sugar diet

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Thanks for the quick reply! I actually had testing done for all those lovely little bugs before we did the elimination diet stuff. The only thing that was noted was a tiny little elevation in canidida but still within normal ranges. I have been cutting out sugar as much as possible (not so great with the holidays of course) since.

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Welcome to the family. The idea that if you don't have one of the 'recognized' celiac genes is unfortunately not the case. There is still much to be learned about this genetic difference.

You malabsoption scores were very high, and you will also need to avoid casien. Be careful as casien can be as sneaky as gluten and just because it says dairy free doesn't mean it is casien free in many cases.

You may want to consider having the malabsorption tests rerun in about 6 months to see if you are healing at a good rate. You also should have your regular test your ferritin, folate and B12 levels as soon as you can and then have those rerun in 6 months.

Go with naturally gluten-free foods for a while to help with healing and I hope you are feeling better soon.

Also Hemp Milk is a great source of calcium and is casien and gluten free. I have osteroporosis and use that as my main calcium source.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Thanks for the advice and the suggestion on the Hemps milk. I was kind of taken aback from the casein results but if I really want to heal then so be it, it is out. What are your thoughts on goats milk?

The malabsorption score was really surprising, I knew it was going on for "obvious" reasons but I didn't think it would be so high. I am still confused on how I could be having that much malabsorpton with no weight loss. Has anyone else experienced that? Maybe I just hadn't quite gotten to that point yet (if so I am thankful for that and hopefully will never get there).

just trying to sort it all out in my head.

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Hi, I'm new here and don't know much, but my 11-year-old had an odd situation where he barely ate anything but stayed kind of chubby. Not what you would call really overweight, but a little pudgy. When he went gluten free, he started eating probably 2 or 3 times more food, but the weight just dropped off him. I mean within days he was slim jim while eating more food. His enterolab malabsorption score was normal, so I don't know the mechanics behind this, but I think it's one more symptom of the body being affected by gluten. Maybe with poor digestion the body just stores the food, being unable to digest it or something. I don't know.

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Yeah I was wondering about that. I was just shocked by how high the malabsorption score was. I mean I knew it was going on but I never fluctuated downward in weight. The body is crazy.

Thanks again Ravenwood for clearing up the genetics thing. I just got the reply from enterolab (I had sent the same Question before I posted here) and it was virtually the same answer :)

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