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lauderdalehawk44

How Can I Gain Weight?

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Hi I was recently diagnosed with celiac disease i never really lost large amounts of weight but I would eat and eat and just wouldnt gain any weight just kind of loose a few pounds. I have been on the gluten-free diet for about two weeks and I want to know if their is any way I can gain weight on this diet?

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Hi there, I noticed no one answered your question yet, for some reason this doesn't seem to be as much as a problem for people than wanting to lose weight.

I am in the same boat as you and struggling desperately to gain weight. I myself weigh 78 pounds now and losing almost 1 pound a day :( I can't do anything for lack of energy and being light headed.

People have suggested to me to eat spoonfulls of peanut butter a day, so far it hasn't worked. I can't gain weight no matter what I eat it seems.

I will be calling my doctor on monday to let him now that I am still losing, I'll post what he suggests, though I'm considering going to another doctor after reading the information on these boards.

In the meantime hang in there, you aren't alone in your troubles.

--micky--

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Micky and Laudedale,

Have you tried digestive enzymes and eating smaller and more frequent meals? Both have helped me. I have added 2 lbs in each of the last two weeks, after not being able to put on weight and losing weight for so long I can't remember when I wasn't losing lbs. I now do five meals a day and find, surprisingly, that I have more appetite than before with just the three meals. The timing is, roughly, 6-9-1-4-7, saving the most concentrated protein meal for the 1 o'clock hour, that is, the egg, cheese, tofu, sardines or canned red salmon. (Of course, the healing of the intestines probably has helped with the weight gain, but even so, my body is telling me that it prefers the 5 meal plan over the 3.)

I also do, roughly again, a four day rotation with the foods. I think this is especially important when doing a 5, or as some do, a 4 or 6 meal plan. You don't want to create intolerances to any food that you are having too many times during the week. This is, I believe, a tendency we may have that others may not have to be concerned about so much. --Aldo

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Just a brief postscript to the above.

Whatever is your preferred protein of the day, I think it's important to have it around noon time and not at night, when digestive power is weaker. Protein metabolism being, we are told, the most problematic for most of us, possibly setting up a condition where undigested protein gets into our blood and creating allergic reactions, it does make sense that we eat concentrated protein when our digestion is best. The 4 o'clock meal is my shutoff time for protein, but most often I do it at the noon meal. Even those who have less difficulty with digesting protein must deal with its waste by-products. We are told it does not "burn clean," as carbs and fats do. If there is merit to this thinking, and I have seen nothing to contradict it, then we need to help the body deal with it, with smaller portions and at the right times. Or so it seems to me. --Aldo

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Micky and Laudedale,

Have you tried digestive enzymes and eating smaller and more frequent meals? Both have helped me. I have added 2 lbs in each of the last two weeks, after not being able to put on weight and losing weight for so long I can't remember when I wasn't losing lbs. I now do five meals a day and find, surprisingly, that I have more appetite than before with just the three meals. The timing is, roughly, 6-9-1-4-7, saving the most concentrated protein meal for the 1 o'clock hour, that is, the egg, cheese, tofu, sardines or canned red salmon. (Of course, the healing of the intestines probably has helped with the weight gain, but even so, my body is telling me that it prefers the 5 meal plan over the 3.)

I also do, roughly again, a four day rotation with the foods. I think this is especially important when doing a 5, or as some do, a 4 or 6 meal plan. You don't want to create intolerances to any food that you are having too many times during the week. This is, I believe, a tendency we may have that others may not have to be concerned about so much. --Aldo

Hey thanks for the response , yeah I thought I was the only one that was having a problem gaining weight all I have seen so far is things about loosing it. I have a question what are digestive enzyme foods ? As far as eatting more meals I bascily do that already I eat and snack non stop all the time lol it just doesnt seam to be going anyplace :unsure: I have only been on the gluten-free for about 3 weeks but I thought I would have put on more weight than I already have. Do you know of any performance weight gainers that are gluten-free ( like what athletes and bodybuilders use) Thanks again for the response good luck to all!!! :D

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Guest Libbyk

this is just my two cents here, but I would stay far far away from "weight gainer" solutions and powders. this is based on a belief that whole, "real" foods have more life, more power and more substance to them inherantly. I think that our bodies are in a fragile state, especially while they are healing The fewer chemicals and processed substances they have to filter through, the easier our guts have it.

Not to mention the risk of gluten contamination in those mystery powders seems (and I am completly ignorant of the process) to be pretty high. It seams like it would be hard to verify the safety.

good luck putting some meat back on your bones.

Libby

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I am also having problems gaining weight. I am currently 22 and have been diagnosed with celiac disease since I was a few months old. I have always been thin/lean as I spent most of my school days playing sport. However as I have got older I hevent gained much weight at all depite the fact that I eat like a horse. About 3 years ago I was also diagnosed with ulcerative colitis which was a bit of a shock - I was extremely ill for over a year and am currently taking asacol tablets to keep the condition under control. I was also on steroids for a while to counter-act the negative effects of the laxatives etc I had to take (I have had 3 colonoscopies since I was diagnosed). As bizarre as it may seem however, I still didnt gain any significant weight when taking steroids, I just found I was eating more often.

I wouldn't say I was severely under weight, Im just a little puzzled at how I can eat so much and yet my weight doesn't seem to change. Sometimes the effects are noticable (looking in the mirror etc), other times its simple things like my watch almost falling off my wrist as the amount of flesh on the bone has decreased.

I'd like to do something to gain weight, even if only a few pounds.

I have read the replies above and may try some of the food changes proposed, any other advice would be greatly appreciated. Would someone such as my GP be able to offer any advice?

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I am newly diagnosed myself and have enjoyed the fact that if I eat gluten-free, I can eat just about anything else. That amazes me. So, I have let my sweet tooth have a ball as well as my love of carbohydrates and I buy the whole milk, real cream, etc. I am sure it is not the best solution, but it is slowly starting to work after about 2 months. I am with you that the intestine has to heal before, you can start to gain.

My doctor suggested I try BOOST nutrition drinks. I did see them on one of the gluten-free lists as long as it did not have malt in it, I believe. As usual, double check the label. My doctor said that in addition to calories, I would also be getting added nutrition. I have not gone to the store to get them yet, but maybe this could help you too. :)

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My husband is the celiac, I am the caretaker. He started Boost this week but can't digest a whole can so only drinks half a can a day. He's 130 lbs. at 5"10" - when he was healthy when I met him he was about 180 lbs. and muscular. I am overweight and I'd love to give him my excess! I told him to add gluten-free ice cream to the Boost in the Blender.

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Guest gillian502

Boost always made me sick...maybe it is cross-contaminated due to the fact they also produce Boost that is NOT gluten-free? They may run the gluten-free Boost on the same lines/equiptment as the Boost that contains the malt. I'd call and ask first.

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I have finally been able to start gaining a tiny bit by doing the following things:

-eating small amounts frequently. sometimes I feel like I'm eating all the time. this also prevents me from feeling sick/nauseous, too, which happens usually 2-3 hours after I eat... it's as if I've completely emptied by that point!

-having good snack foods on hand all the time. things I like! like gluten-free cookies (glutano makes some REALLY good ones) and crackers and chips and things like that. my primary health concern is gluten/dairy, so I don't worry about fat/calories, and doctors have all supported/suggested this.

-do as little physical exercise as possible. it might sound odd or lazy but my doctors told me this. while you don't absorb nutrients because of gluten, you don't get any energy... and even after you're gluten-free, you still need extra energy for tissue growth and recovery! so get more rest than the robustly healthy!

-eggs, if you eat them. studies show you can eat 1-2 a day and have only good results (as far as cholesterol goes.) look it up online for confirmation if you'd like. I started eating a hard-boiled egg every day and every week I've done that, I've gained.

it's really hard, and can be frustrating. I get people telling me, you look anorexic! and I get people telling me, you look GREAT! the funky culture in this country doesn't help, see? so do what is healthy and good for yourself. take good care!

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-do as little physical exercise as possible. it might sound odd or lazy but my doctors told me this. while you don't absorb nutrients because of gluten, you don't get any energy... and even after you're gluten-free, you still need extra energy for tissue growth and recovery! so get more rest than the robustly healthy!

I, too, am trying to put on a few pounds. I'm not severely underweight, and I have actually been quite successful since starting...I used to be straddling the 70 pound mark, dropping to 68 if I'd get sick, and now I'm nearly 80...much better, although it couldn't hurt to add another ten pounds. When I started, my mother went to a nutritionist while I was in school. I had had the same idea about exercise that you mentioned: I like to run, but I stayed off the track team, didn't join the soccer team, and only played hockey. However, the nutritionist said that I shouldn't try to change my physical activities, but rather, just gain weight from the diet change. That kinda conflicts with what Jen-schall said above...maybe the nutritionist was just trying to make the transition a diet change, rather than a life change...I don't know.

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And I thought I was doing soooo well.........nope. I've gained....about 8-9 pounds, which is good......but:

However, I'm 13, so this is around the age when boys are having big growth spurts -- my weight gain puts me at the same percentile in the growth curve--sure, I've gained, but I've gained enough to keep me gaining at the same sort of rate I was before......an interesting and true tidbit I got from the new doc.

He said I should try to eat more--and I did--I never had a huge appetite--both the doc. and I think that it's an aversion I've developed to food since it made me sick. I am by no means anorexic or anything; just not really hungry. Anyway, the last two days I went on a rampage--I probably tripled what I used to eat--and then I got sick (no vomiting, but abdominal pains all night).

Well, maybe I increased my appetite by too much, but now I'm scared to eat more than I had--I'll continue to eat a little more, but my digestive system just can't take all that food. Therefore, my doc. wants me to keep a journal of what I eat; he'll look it over with the nutritionist I went to and they'll probably give me some gluten-free supplement that's easy to digest so that I can gain weight....that's really nice of him--at this point, I'd love to gain 12 pounds :lol: (I'm 78 pounds and about 5'1"; I'd be happy with a solid 85, but 90 would be terrific :) ).

I'll let you know if I take a supplement--if so, what kind--and if I gain weight with it and don't get symptoms while using it. Maybe I'll try that egg thing--I eat eggs maybe once a week, anyway...maybe once every week and a half......but I like them--I'd eat them twice a week and they don't give me problems.

-celiac3270

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I find that I have lost weight and muscle mass sine starting a gluten free diet. I agree with eating less more frequently. It seems like I have a problem with not only the types of foods, but also eating too much at one time.

I might also suggest vitamin supplements. I use GNC since the vitamins I take are gluten free. I also plan on using protein supplements to help with the muscle mass.

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I have also been losing weight rapidly since starting the gluten-free diet, and I didn't have a lot of weight to spare starting out. I don't know how well it's working yet but I've been going on a "anti-Atkins" diet. I snack on carbs all day long. I make gluten-free snickerdoodles, rice pudding, eat Pamela's chocolate chunk cookies and spend hours each week making fresh gluten-free pasta to keep my body fueled. Most of my waking day is spent trying to get more calories into my body, and at night I dream about cooking and eating. Food has become my entire life- I'm always in the kitchen these days! On the plus side, I am getting more familiar with the gluten-free ingredients and I can cook quite a few decent gluten-free meals for my trouble. The truly difficult part is getting it into my wife's head that snacking on carbs all day is NOT a bad thing for me; just because she's trying to avoid them doesn't mean that I should.

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You need lots of protein, too. My doctor had me eating red meat at every meal for a while.

richard

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Eating less more frequently is a good idea in theory, but would be difficult for me to do. When you go to school from 8:00-4:30, and there's one lunch period, it's kinda hard--let me rephrase that--impossible to squeeze in five or six little meals.

How about Ensure? All flavors are gluten-free.......has a lot of nutrients, but I don't know if it'd have a great effect on any of you if nothing else has worked.

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I am no expert on diet and nutrition by any means, but my instincts and everything I have ever learned tells me that eating carbs all day and getting no exercise is just diabetes waiting to happen!

I probably have not had as much physical pain as many of you, but I did feel too crummy to exercise before going gluten-free due to not keeping any food in me. Once I went gluten-free and that problem got better, I started exercising again right away - nothing excessive, just 30 minutes 3 or 4 times a week. It is amazing how much better I feel. I think that this also stimulates the appetite but I would eat as much protein as you can digest without having problems. I eat cheese in the morning, tuna on salad or whatever was leftover from the night before (protein) at lunch and meat and veggies at night - sometimes with a boiled egg thrown in for good measure. I also eat fruit all day long (with peel). It's in season now and yummy. Peaches, grapes, plums, banana. All the processed, simple carbohydrates are not good for anyone, regardless of the state of their body. But putting that into an already-sick system is not good. And that's not the kind of weight you want to gain (fluffy, not firm!).

I am not saying never have a treat, because I do that too! Just not all day long!

Take care of that body - do what you can, when you can and put good stuff into it. It's the only one you're ever going to have and hopefully it will last a long time! :D

Celeste

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I am no expert on diet and nutrition by any means, but my instincts and everything I have ever learned tells me that eating carbs all day and getting no exercise is just diabetes waiting to happen!

I probably have not had as much physical pain as many of you, but I did feel too crummy to exercise before going gluten-free due to not keeping any food in me. Once I went gluten-free and that problem got better, I started exercising again right away - nothing excessive, just 30 minutes 3 or 4 times a week. It is amazing how much better I feel. I think that this also stimulates the appetite but I would eat as much protein as you can digest without having problems. I eat cheese in the morning, tuna on salad or whatever was leftover from the night before (protein) at lunch and meat and veggies at night - sometimes with a boiled egg thrown in for good measure. I also eat fruit all day long (with peel). It's in season now and yummy. Peaches, grapes, plums, banana. All the processed, simple carbohydrates are not good for anyone, regardless of the state of their body. But putting that into an already-sick system is not good. And that's not the kind of weight you want to gain (fluffy, not firm!).

I am not saying never have a treat, because I do that too! Just not all day long!

Take care of that body - do what you can, when you can and put good stuff into it. It's the only one you're ever going to have and hopefully it will last a long time! :D

Celeste

Hi, I'm new here and new to the gluten-free diet.

I'm not officially diagnosed because I don't have health insurance but the MD I saw suggested I try a 2 week experiment of being gluten-free. She said she has it, herself, and strongly suspected it in me. It worked and I'm still on the diet after rought 5 weeks now.

I'm in the catagory of needing to gain weight and didn't need to lose in the first place. This is why I've posted to this thread and hopefully moving it back up for further discussion.

I would also like to know what products others have tried. For instance, I've tried the Kinnikkinnik brand and their blueberry and carrot muffins are great. Their rolls and breads, buns, etc. are yuck! I would love to find decent tasting breads. I'm also allergic to any soy products. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I don't eat red meat but do eat chicken and turkey. I've found pasta I like and a few good crackers but again, I'm in the boat of being hungry all the time. I really miss pizza. Anyone know of any good frozen ones?

Much thanks,

Linda

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Hi, I'm new here and new to the gluten-free diet.

I'm not officially diagnosed because I don't have health insurance but the MD I saw suggested I try a 2 week experiment of being gluten-free. She said she has it, herself, and strongly suspected it in me. It worked and I'm still on the diet after rought 5 weeks now.

I'm in the catagory of needing to gain weight and didn't need to lose in the first place. This is why I've posted to this thread and hopefully moving it back up for further discussion.

I would also like to know what products others have tried. For instance, I've tried the Kinnikkinnik brand and their blueberry and carrot muffins are great. Their rolls and breads, buns, etc. are yuck! I would love to find decent tasting breads. I'm also allergic to any soy products. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I don't eat red meat but do eat chicken and turkey. I've found pasta I like and a few good crackers but again, I'm in the boat of being hungry all the time. I really miss pizza. Anyone know of any good frozen ones?

Much thanks,

Linda

Hi Linda! Welcome to the board :)

I think your doctor is very wise. I'm glad that the diet is working out so well for you. I would suggest looking into Enjoy Life Foods--they are a company that does not use the top 8 allergens in their foods, and are a dedicated gluten-free facility. Here is a link

http://www.enjoylifefoods.com/cart/department.asp

Let us know if there's anything else we can do for you!

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I have a difficult time maintaining as well, but I have found that if I start the day with a good breakfast.. eggs, turkey, fruit and grits, or peanutbutter Vans waffles and fruit it helps to get in extra calories.

I am personally not a fan of the boosts but it does through in some extra calories. The boost PLUS has the most.

Snacking is also helpful in adding calories.

Invest in a breadmachine, and enjoy homemade gluten free bread its much better than the pre made kind and I think it has help me put on a few pounds. It is more calorie dense than the salads I was eating for lunch.

Eat lots of peanutbutter if its possible it is fulll of calories.

ALSO.. if you haven't tried Lara bars I tried them this week and they are great! I love the apple cinnamion its a great snack with 210 calories per bar and it nutritious!

Good luck gaining!

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Hi, I'm new here and new to the gluten-free diet.

I'm not officially diagnosed because I don't have health insurance but the MD I saw suggested I try a 2 week experiment of being gluten-free. She said she has it, herself, and strongly suspected it in me. It worked and I'm still on the diet after rought 5 weeks now.

I'm in the catagory of needing to gain weight and didn't need to lose in the first place. This is why I've posted to this thread and hopefully moving it back up for further discussion.

I would also like to know what products others have tried. For instance, I've tried the Kinnikkinnik brand and their blueberry and carrot muffins are great. Their rolls and breads, buns, etc. are yuck! I would love to find decent tasting breads. I'm also allergic to any soy products. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I don't eat red meat but do eat chicken and turkey. I've found pasta I like and a few good crackers but again, I'm in the boat of being hungry all the time. I really miss pizza. Anyone know of any good frozen ones?

Much thanks,

Linda

i am really particular about my food, because well i've only been gluten-free for about 18 months and I still know what real food tastes like- I have found that food by The Grainless Baker is really wonderful, I believe that they'll ship their foods and I really have been impressed. I have tried their muffins, bagels, bread crumbs and pizza crusts and they are all fab!!

If you are really missing pizza I have found the best way to make some in a flash is by using a gluten-free rice cake and all the toppings you usually would- put them in a hot oven for a few minutes (or microwave) and tada! Okay, it's not going to be Dominos or anything but it will help those cravings.

I too have had trouble putting weight on. I thought I was really thin, but some of your stories have made me realize I am not that thin. I am 5'2" and I fluctuate between 102-105. I guess that isn't so bad, but when you are more comfortable at a size 4 or 6 then a size 0 something is up. I get very discouraged about my weight... I am a Slovak girl and we are supposed to be thick women!!!!

My doctor has told me to eat a bowl of icecream before bed every night- and I was gaining weight, but worried about so much sugar hitting my bloodstream. I agree with you Celeste we need to treat our bodies like temples, because we are just asking for Diabetes!!!!!!!

I wish I could put weight on, and I wish I could have more energy... :( I miss my old self!

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I am also having problems gaining weight. I am currently 22 and have been diagnosed with celiac disease since I was a few months old. I have always been thin/lean as I spent most of my school days playing sport. However as I have got older I hevent gained much weight at all depite the fact that I eat like a horse. About 3 years ago I was also diagnosed with ulcerative colitis which was a bit of a shock - I was extremely ill for over a year and am currently taking asacol tablets to keep the condition under control. I was also on steroids for a while to counter-act the negative effects of the laxatives etc I had to take (I have had 3 colonoscopies since I was diagnosed). As bizarre as it may seem however, I still didnt gain any significant weight when taking steroids, I just found I was eating more often.

I wouldn't say I was severely under weight, Im just a little puzzled at how I can eat so much and yet my weight doesn't seem to change. Sometimes the effects are noticable (looking in the mirror etc), other times its simple things like my watch almost falling off my wrist as the amount of flesh on the bone has decreased.

I'd like to do something to gain weight, even if only a few pounds.

I have read the replies above and may try some of the food changes proposed, any other advice would be greatly appreciated. Would someone such as my GP be able to offer any advice?

Hi just a few cents to add,i am in the very same boat.2and a half yrs ago i was diagnoised with celiac disease. I used to weigh 123lbs. I went down to 83lbs. and in a wheel chair,now i walk on my own. This is how i did it.The doc said to go on nutritient drink,i drink a safeway brand and it's strawberry,your preference. I was given a cookbook gluten free of course,and looked through for some reciepes found one jam cookies.Well i made these twice a week and ate them as often as i could in a day along with my nutritient shakes,and my daily intake of food for the day.I ate and ate and ate these cookies and shakes for 3mths.went right up to 125lbs.The texture of the cookies are the same as short bread no difference they are very good,and i am one for texture.these cookies have all different names for them ,Thumbprintz.It's a ball of dough you make a little indent in the middle and fill it up with a little jam of your liking.Trust me this works .It takes alittle time rolling the dough into little balls but it's worth the weight.........lololo. Hope this helps.If you want the receipe just let me know it's simple.balena967@hotmail.com

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I am also having problems gaining weight. I am currently 22 and have been diagnosed with celiac disease since I was a few months old. I have always been thin/lean as I spent most of my school days playing sport. However as I have got older I hevent gained much weight at all depite the fact that I eat like a horse. About 3 years ago I was also diagnosed with ulcerative colitis which was a bit of a shock - I was extremely ill for over a year and am currently taking asacol tablets to keep the condition under control. I was also on steroids for a while to counter-act the negative effects of the laxatives etc I had to take (I have had 3 colonoscopies since I was diagnosed). As bizarre as it may seem however, I still didnt gain any significant weight when taking steroids, I just found I was eating more often.

I wouldn't say I was severely under weight, Im just a little puzzled at how I can eat so much and yet my weight doesn't seem to change. Sometimes the effects are noticable (looking in the mirror etc), other times its simple things like my watch almost falling off my wrist as the amount of flesh on the bone has decreased.

I'd like to do something to gain weight, even if only a few pounds.

I have read the replies above and may try some of the food changes proposed, any other advice would be greatly appreciated. Would someone such as my GP be able to offer any advice?

Hi just a few cents to add,i am in the very same boat.2and a half yrs ago i was diagnoised with celiac disease. I used to weigh 123lbs. I went down to 83lbs. and in a wheel chair,now i walk on my own. This is how i did it.The doc said to go on nutritient drink,i drink a safeway brand and it's strawberry,your preference. I was given a cookbook gluten free of course,and looked through for some reciepes found one jam cookies.Well i made these twice a week and ate them as often as i could in a day along with my nutritient shakes,and my daily intake of food for the day.I ate and ate and ate these cookies and shakes for 3mths.went right up to 125lbs.The texture of the cookies are the same as short bread no difference they are very good,and i am one for texture.these cookies have all different names for them ,Thumbprintz.It's a ball of dough you make a little indent in the middle and fill it up with a little jam of your liking.Trust me this works .It takes alittle time rolling the dough into little balls but it's worth the weight.........lololo. Hope this helps.If you want the receipe just let me know it's simple.balena967@hotmail.com

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Hi I was recently diagnosed with celiac disease i never really lost large amounts of weight but I would eat and eat and just wouldnt gain any weight just kind of loose a few pounds. I have been on the gluten-free diet for about two weeks and I want to know if their is any way I can gain weight on this diet?

i had your prob abd what helped me was protien, every meal and in between. also you know those shakes that are meal replacements, you should try them as a drink inbetween meals to help build up. lots of high fat meals and high suger snacks to give you energy, and also the rehydrateing drinks are good as they do contain some good nutreintrs and cals. hope it helps and good luck.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.