• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Announcements

    • Scott Adams

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
0
b91hd7fjk

Can Not Stop Gaining Weight!

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I have been gluten-free for 2 1/2 years now. When I was diagnosed I was about 125 (due to a little weight loss prior to diagnosis) I am now close to 150 and I am 5'6 its getting to the point that my stomach should be healing and I need to regulate my weight again. Although it has been gradual...I have really noticed how different clothes are fitting and how I feel.

These days I am constantly craving sweets. I have found that 'Just Born' is gluten-free so I have been stuck on eating candies!!! Huge problem!!

Some days I dont get hungry at all and other days I can eat to fill 4 stomachs. I did a little of research on my own and began strictly counting calories...weather it is 900 calories a day or 1900 that I eat my body does not respond. Even cardio work outs 4x a week didnt make a difference...I know our systems are much different than others so PLEASE help if you have any suggestions...I am going to Hawaii with my boyfriend in a few months and need to shake off a few lbs. besides that im only 21 and dont want to develop bad habits.

Oh and I recently went to the doctors and my thyroid is great and i am not diabetic...although I need to watch!

Thanks to everyone for reading! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Hmm.... I'm not sure what direction to approach this so I guess I'll hit all the stops... If you are gluten-free and feeling healthy again and you really are eating only 900 calories for say a couple weeks at a time and not losing a pound then there is something wrong and you need a doctor to evaluate your situation. I'm not sure but you might ask your doctor for a consult with an endocrinologist (i think they cover metabolism and such). But if I were you I'd keep a food diary for about a month or so, so you can prove that you have really been trying and its not working. A food diary should include everything that goes into your mouth, including water, gum, and just a sip or taste of this or that. If you have an HMO you might be able to get a consult with a dietitian.

I certainly am not in the medical field but I consider myself an expert on weight loss. I've watched my weight every single day of my life. People often laugh when I tell them I'm an expert they say, "oh right, your thin!" I'm thin because I watch everything that goes in my mouth.

My sister in law has gained a lot of weight over the past 5 years (change of life stuff) and she told me for a year that she was only eating 1000 calories a day and was not losing any weight. I kept telling her it was impossible. I went out there last summer for 2 weeks and she managed to lose 6 pounds while I was there. There is nothing wrong with her metabolism she just didn't count calories well. A nibble of this and sip of that, just a bite, and a glass of wine (which usually turns into 2).

Most people I know diet like this: day 1: really good on 1000 calorie diet. day 2: pretty good but had 1 cookie. day 3: did ok but had a few snacks. day 4-7: totally screwed it up.

The bottom line is that for someone your size that IS in good health, if you eat 900 calories and exercise every day you WILL lose weight. Its hard, believe me I know it. Have you tried any of those online diet places (e-diet I think and I know weight watchers has one too). I'm sure there are lots of people here that would be willing to offer advice and encouragement (maybe we should start a gluten-free dieting thread), myself included (I can be sort of boot camp however which I'm sure is apparent from my post).

In a nutshell this is what I do when I need to lose weight: walk 3 miles every single day, no days off (I have a big dog). I eat mainly fruits, veggies, protein. NO white in my diet (no rice, potatoes, cereal, baked goods, etc.) drink more water with lemon.

Here is how I live when I don't need to lose weight: walk 3 miles every single day, no days off (I have a big dog). I eat mainly fruits, veggies, protein. drink more water with lemon. I have an occasional glass of wine. I eat small amounts of rice or potatoes or a cookie or trail mix or power bar or even ice cream when I feel like it (but no more then once a day). The key with this stuff is small amounts. I love sweets too - chocolate and ice cream are way up on my list!

When I tell this to people sometimes I hear: but I want to enjoy my life. I'm a firm believer that our enjoyment in life shouldn't be centered around food. Hey I love to eat and drink, and I eat in good restaurants often and really savor it, but i get my real enjoyment from my family, my dog, my boyfriend, my friends, books, walking, my job, hiking, the beach, shopping, etc. Its a change of mindset and for the past 10 years or so... my glass is way more then half full, its positively brimming.

I'm 53, 5'7" I'm 2 pounds under my high school weight (I'm 119 this morning), healthy, happy, active. I really believe good health is a powerful key to happiness.

I really believe that anyone in good health can lose weight but I know first hand its not easy and to do it we can all use a lot of help, ideas and encouragement.

Good luck! Susan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a believer in all that pixigirl had to say. I know some people that say they try and then you accually find out well they are walking only 10 minutes on the treadmill that is no effort to me. Or the snack too. People snack and don't realize that they are even doing it. They had a donut at work but forgot to count it, snacked on candy at work or home thought that maybe it was 6 pieces today but it was accually 12. Things like this really do play into the weight loss. I am a firm believer of a journal if you want the weight to come off. Keep it in your pocket an mark down even a taste of something because it really does have calories. The biggest thing is change if you are not use to exersicing everyday or journalling everything that touches your lips it will seem like work at first. Do it for 2 weeks and it becomes a habit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The bottom line is that for someone your size that IS in good health, if you eat 900 calories and exercise every day you WILL lose weight.

I have to disagree completely. I have lost a considerable amount of weight and maintained for a long time. If you are only eating 900cal/day, it's NOT enough. Your body goes into starvation mode and actually holds onto averything you put in because it doesn't know when it's going to be nourished again. For your height and weight, your BMI is 24.2 which is at the higher end of normal (18.5-24.9), more importantly, your RMR (resting metabolic rate) is 1750--this is the amount of calories needed to sustain LIFE FUNCTIONS with a sedentary lifestyle. This is what the RMR is for the following:

Lightly active (1-3 days/week) 2000 calories

Moderately active (3-5 days/week)-2260 calories

Very active (5-7 days/week)-2500 calories.

The more active you are the more calories you body needs to survive. To lose weight, you need a BALANCE of calorie reduction and exercise but I don't recommend going below 1500 calories unless you are confined to a wheelchair or bed and are not active at all. So eat ~1500-1600 calories a day and work out 5-6 days a week, you shouldn't have a problem at all.

(I am in the medical field...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I'd like to add those are general guidelines and everyone's metabolism isn't exactly the same.

I also want to make it clear that I wasn't implying she should eat 900 calories a day, that isn't healthy at all. I was just making the point that if one was eating 900 calories a day for weeks at a time, and they have no metabolic disorders, the bottom line is that you are going to lose weight. (and I do understand how the body slows down your metabolism if you don't get enough calories but you will still ultimately lose weight if you continue very very low calories)

Personally when I need to lose a few pounds (I never let myself go more then 5 lbs over my ideal weight) I go to about 1300 - 1500 calories a day and its gone quickly.

Just wanted to make sure no one thought that 900 calories is a good idea.

Susan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Well I'd like to add those are general guidelines and everyone's metabolism isn't exactly the same.

I also want to make it clear that I wasn't implying she should eat 900 calories a day, that isn't healthy at all. I was just making the point that if one was eating 900 calories a day for weeks at a time, and they have no metabolic disorders, the bottom line is that you are going to lose weight. (and I do understand how the body slows down your metabolism if you don't get enough calories but you will still ultimately lose weight if you continue very very low calories)

Personally when I need to lose a few pounds (I never let myself go more then 5 lbs over my ideal weight) I go to about 1300 - 1500 calories a day and its gone quickly.

Just wanted to make sure no one thought that 900 calories is a good idea.

Susan

I'm sorry if I misunderstood. Although I'm in cardiovascular services, I have done extensive training in nutrition and weight loss. I don't have a degree in it--wanted to but I my DH says I make too much $$ doing what I do :rolleyes: and I do like it. I've worked with a lot of women with their health and nutrition so I feel really comfortable with my 'methods' but I realize that everyone has their own ways. What works for one doesn't work for everyone. I just want to help out in any way I can!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:D Yes I didn't mean to sound argumentative and just like you I didn't want anyone to think that I thought taking in only 900 calories a day was a good way to lose weight. In my book its a good way to ruin your health.

I am very "into" being healthy... exercise, eating right, maintaining my weight, being positive and centered. For the most part I eat whatever I want too, I just eat the stuff with more calories in smaller portions. I don't want to make it sound easy either, like I said before its an every day thing for me and I know my sister in law struggles with her weight every day. Its certainly not easy.

And we put so much stock into being a certain weight, but whether you are at that weight or not, try and enjoy life.

Susan!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I originally gained weight when I went gluten free, but that was due to hording foods like Nacho's and ice cream out of withdrawls. After I had gained 20 pds and was at my mid pregnancy weight I finally decided enough was enough. I have since lost 42 pds and my motabolism has gotten a major boost. Before I went gluten free I could not eat more then 500 calories a day without gaining weight (NO JOKE). People never used to believe me when I said that but it was more then true. Now I eat normally and still seem to lose a little and gain a little thus my weight stays within a certain range. I wonder if it's the candy that's causing you to crave so much, and there could be something in it that your body wants to hold onto because it's missing out on all the other things you used to eat. If you can stand it try to eat fruits, veggies, and meats for a few weeks and see if that makes a difference (that's what I did and my motabolism finally took off)!! Good luck and I hope you are able to figure out what works for you really soon.

~~Angie~~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My personal advice is to cut way, way, way down on processed foods.

Right now I'm eating meats cooked from scratch, veggies, fruits, rice cakes for snacks, nuts, peanut butter and honey and I'm losing weight very nicely -- without being hungry. In fact, I don't even limit the quantities I can eat. If I'm hungry, I just have a healthy snack.

I have lost 60 pounds from my pre-diagnosis weight.

Eliminate prepackaged gluten-free food. Stop the candy. If you drink regular soda, cut that out, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really appreciate all the feedback!! I would like to make my daily eating habbits a little clearer..currently I am on an elimination diet because after the holiday travels I feel sicker and sicker. Elimination diet for me basically consists of plain white rice (brown makes me sick) lettuce and other greens such as cucumbers and green peppers etc. uncooked. Fruits like grapes apples and oranges in small amounts. Egg whites and a cheese and butter in very small amounts. I started this on Sunday and tonight I am adding back in to my diet fish..ill probably only cook it with a little lemon and butter and seasons. Other than that its plain plain plain.

For about a month or more I was religious with a journal...every sip every bite all of it...thats how i knew about the actual calorie count (calorieking.com) the truth is I cant seem to train myself to get away from the sweets..I will drink coffee sweet or increase the fruits I am eating to substitute for the candies. I think its all in my head because I feel like I sacrifice so much by elimiating gluten from my diet I dont want to take anything else out of my system. Its important to maintain balance and I know that, but somedays I forget that now I actually have to work on it to lose weight.

My other problem is as of right now in my living quarters I only have a microwave toaster oven and fridge literally. No freezer no stove top...nothing. I can cook at my boyfriends but he has three roommates who do consume wheat so its a total catch 22. I know there are ways to buy hot plates and what not but financially right now there is not much I can afford. I am living paycheck to paycheck so basically I am looking for a diet that I do not need to cook a lot. I can attain it at a low cost. And will help me train my palate to not need sweets the way I do now.

I work as a sales associate so I am naturally on my feet 40 hours a week walking around....my boyfriend is a personal trainer and we plan to get back into the gym together with our cardio and weight training routines but even like now we are not working out and I would consider myself moderately active.

I am seriously thinking about seeing a nutritionist but you all were who I turned to first..I know the weight gain is normal but I used to be able to lose weight like it was nothing...now....not so much. I am willing to try any diets you might have for me but if you could be specific with times inbetween meals and snacks and stuff it owuld be much appreciated. This insane sweet tooth has got to go!!! and I can be very diciplined so let me know if something has worked for you.

Oh and another important thing to know is my boyfriend LOVES to take me out to dinner. He understands how difficult it is so im working on getting him out of that habit..I feel like that is where a lot of the gain is coming from too. Just something else to keeep in mind. ok Thanks!!!!

-Staci

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


I eat out a lot too and if I'm not trying to lose weight I order what I want to, but I rarely finish it all I often bring some of it home. If I am in the weight loss mode I stick with fish and salad and veggies, or chicken, much plainer food. But we still enjoy going out (no cooking, no clean up, etc.). I usually splurge when we are out to dinner and have wine.

I know its hard to change your thinking around but I don't feel like I give up much by going gluten-free, I was so ill prior to finding out I had celiac that it was a relief to me that I could just take gluten out of my diet and feel so good.

Since then I've found I have food allergies too, so I can't have nuts, peanuts. I am allergic to but can eat in small amounts, tomato, lettuce, beans, squash. But I don't feel I'm giving up a lot, I'm health and happy.

Susan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been trying to figure out why I have gained weight and after much research I have decided it's the caffeine in the coffee, and I know that sounds silly but it can affect your cortisol levels. This might not apply to you as much as it would me, as I'm 51.

The endo is going to check my cortisol level and I read that coffee can increase your cortisol level just like stress, which can cause you to gain weight. I wasn't eating anything and gaining weight. It was killing me. I am switching to decaf to see if it helps. I only put 1/2 tsp of sugar in my coffee. I may have to rethink the sugar too.

Also, if you eat something sugary or starchy, it makes you crave something sugary. That's why eating protein and fruits, and vegetables is so good for a diet. It gets rid of the cravings. That plain rice also fuels cravings.

Update on the caffeine theory:

Dr Perricone says: "Coffee (and it's not the caffeine) can result in elevated levels of cortisol and insulin, leading to weight gain. Remember, elevated insulin puts a lock on body fat. If you substitute green tea for coffee, and do nothing else differently, you will lose 10 pounds in six weeks."

Just wanted to pass that along. And I just bought 2 packs of decaf organic coffee. Oh well....

Edited by hayley3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel for you.

When I first got sick I gained about 40 pounds. Everything that was going through me like lightning and I was just trying to keep up.

I am 5'2 115 pounds and I watch everything that goes into my mouth. I also bought a scale (weigh myself DAILY) and I walk EVERY SINGLE DAY. 3 days did nothing, 4 days nothing I have to do it every single day and you know what I love it.

I am crossing my fingers you find what works for you.

Don't give up.

lovelove

sickchick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really think we're all different....different bodies/ages/metabolisms, etc. Speaking for myself, when I went gluten free I started experimenting with all the gluten free stuff (feeling sorry for myself), and most of it is really high sugar/low nutrient value, and I had to get a hold of myself and I reasoned that wait....I didn't hog down all this stuff "before", so why do it now. I was gaining weight, and even worse, all that stuff (weird alternative flours/starches/plus the sugar) just didn't agree with me.

When I cut all that stuff out....I cut out all the grains and starches, most dairy, ate limited fruit, and concentrated on plain meats, veggies, salads, ate frequent but SMALL meals, drank a lot of water....everything straightened out and I lost weight quickly and effortlessly.

I am VERY carb sensitive, and sugary things make me feel sick. I bloat up and start getting cravings and gain weight from all the stuff I eliminated.

Also....many people minimize how many calories they eat. I just saw a show about extreme obesity and there was this 400 lb. woman saying how little she ate, she guessed about 2,000 calories a day max, but when they really watched her and computed her calories, she was shoveling down 15,000 a day. I know you're not doing that, but you may actually be underestimating what you eat.

And I don't agree with those who say "a calorie is a calorie." I have seen with myself that while total calories are always a consideration, it's the composition of the foods that make all the different in my own case. If I ate 1500 calories of eggs, leans meats & veggies I'd be fine and probably lose weight. If I ate 1500 calories of breads/starches/fruit/sugar things I'd bloat up like a pig and put on 10 pounds very quickly doing that for a few days.

Control your cravings by limiting, or preferably eliminating sugars, starches, and other high carb-low nutrient foods. It only takes a couple of days to lose ALL the cravings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And I don't agree with those who say "a calorie is a calorie." I have seen with myself that while total calories are always a consideration, it's the composition of the foods that make all the different in my own case. If I ate 1500 calories of eggs, leans meats & veggies I'd be fine and probably lose weight. If I ate 1500 calories of breads/starches/fruit/sugar things I'd bloat up like a pig and put on 10 pounds very quickly doing that for a few days.

Control your cravings by limiting, or preferably eliminating sugars, starches, and other high carb-low nutrient foods. It only takes a couple of days to lose ALL the cravings.

I think you are totally right about this. If you eat 1500 empty calories - then you're just hungry and irritable too. I've been watching The Biggest Loser (looking for motivation!) and they mentioned that you cannot burn calories if your body is processing sugar. That makes total sense to me. I have almost the exact same problem as you - I'm 8 days from my "year anniversary" and have put on quite a bit of weight this year. I'm absorbing food for once, but haven't changed the amount I eat. I also had the - I have to give up so much - but I can still have candy - mentality. That's been hard for me. My big problem is hunger. I started my diet Jan 1 and I'm hungry all of the time. I don't count calories - I do weight watchers - and have been trying to exercise everday. I'm going to try and cut out the candy starting tomorrow! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am also in the boat of weight gain....I put on at least 30lbs since I went gluten free in 2004. I really have gained in the last few months....my thyroid levels are fine though....I am hoping to get excersing more, because I don't really eat bad things...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a college student and work full time...needless to say I have a super busy life so sometimes it seems impossible to be on the run and eat small meals frequently. I can not even make it to a microwave every few hours let alone a complete kitchen to prepare all these meats/proteins I know I need to eat. When I make it home in the evening I usually eat a normal meal for dinner and a snack or dessert before bed...VERY bad!!! When Opera lost all of her weight she didn't eat a single thing after 7pm...why cant I do that?!!?!?!?

I feel like I am venting because this morning and all day I did very welll. Carbs with protein and small amounts at a time..then come this evening I downed a whole bag of popcorn, a coke, 3 fruit snacks and 2 small pieces of chocolate. Its ridiculous and I am totally embarassed to say it but I feel like I lost control tonight. :(

Tomorrow I am back to work and will bring only a set amount of snacks and meals I can eat. Hopefully I will do better then. Thanks for listening.

-Staci

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well its been said in this thread a number of times that we each have to find our own way and what works for each of us, and that is so true.

I said that I watch my weight constantly and don't go over my 5 pound limit, which is true, however at one point in time I did gain weight. I was at the end of my marriage and very unhappy at the time. I gained about 30 pounds and carried it around for about a year. When I finally got divorced I was just ready for a change and I hated how I looked, for me I had to sort of reach a rock bottom to have the will power to actually lose weight.

I went on a pretty strict diet and started to lose it. I'll tell you there is nothing like seeing the pounds drop off to help you stick to your diet. I lost it over the course of 3 months. It was after that I vowed never to gain more then a few pounds again, it was just too hard to take it off.

I am nothing if not disciplined, my job requires it and so over time its become a part of my personality. And so I allow myself few treats every day, even when I'm in the diet mode. Usually its a 100 calorie bag of popcorn and a few Hershey's kisses or a small piece of dark chocolate. For me if I don't have some chocolate I do feel deprived and then end up falling off the diet. But again you have to be really disciplined to only eat a small piece.

I guess for those of you that feel deprived when you diet you need to find some sort of reward so that doesn't happen because in my experience it can foil a diet every time. Shopping, chocolate, a glass of wine every few days... whatever floats your boat. Also when i diet I get rid of big bags of tortilla chips and such, its far easier not to eat them when they are not here! I'll go out and purchase 100 calorie bags of stuff and put a sign in my pantry: Only 1 treat a day! We use to have a dish out with Hershey's Kissables in it and I can't tell you how often I'd walk by and grab a "few". They add up. So on top of just going on a diet I think one needs to sit down and figure out where your diet downfalls are and how you will avoid them AHEAD OF TIME. I'm one of those Oprah type people: I will not eat after 7 pm. The only time that rule changes is when I go on vacation or its some special occasion.

Good luck. Susan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to hear about other's stories, how they got to where they are now. Mine started when I was hitting puberty ~12y/o. I have a brother and sister who could eat whatever they want and stay abnormally skinny. I was always compared to them. The question was often asked "Don't you wish you could look like your sister, don't you wish you could be as thin as her?" The sad thing is, looking back, I was completely normal size-but when I looked in the mirror, I saw a distorted obese child. Once puberty was in full swing, I had VERY large breasts and the attention turned to those--"poor Rachelle" and my "beefy arms" Talk about the best way to send a young teenager into a downward spiral of eating disorders (anorexia followed by binging--every other day pattern), depression and very poor self esteem. I got pretty thin in the later part of high school, still thought I was really fat, graduated and moved away. In college, I was pre-med, too busy to eat, let alone eat healthy-I dropped 20 more # and people started getting worried. I got married at 20, gained a lot of weight--I really had no idea at that point how much I gained, I had no scale, ignored how my clothes fit. My dad remarried when I was 22. We had family members there who I hadn't seen since I was 12. It was the first time that I saw people staring at me in a negative way. I will NEVER forget the way it felt to have people look at me with such pity, again I heard "poor Rachelle." That was my 1st major turning point. I bought a scale, started weighing, measuring and journaling food, started working out most days, lost 25# in the next few months. Then the weight loss stopped completely. I found out I was pregnant with my DD. I did really well thru the pregnancy, I gained 35# which I was OK with. On her 1 week birthday ;) I was up early, laying in bed with her and I turned on the TV. Every station was stuck on this one image of this burning building. It took me a few minutes to figure out what was going on. It was Sept. 11, 2001. I was learning what was happening on the east coast while staring at this beautiful healthy child wondering what the hell did I bring her into? That was my 2nd, and final, turning point. I knew that I had to be there and be strong to raise and protect my child. It took me a little longer (2 years) but I lost 100# and have kept it off (almost 5 years now). I, like Susan, try not to eat after 7, I never go more than 3-4# over my 'ideal' weight (ideal for me), I never deprive myself anything. If I want a treat, I'll eat a treat--but I don't have the 'need' to eat a whole pan of brownies anymore. I'm OK with one. Do I struggle? Absolutly. I will always struggle. It's still hard for me to look in the mirror and see a woman who's a size 8 instead of a size 18. My sister is a photographer and she'll send me pictures and at first I won't recognize myself. I hope one day I will be able to look in the mirror and TRULY see how far I've come--not just telling myself, but actually believe. I guess life is a growth process. You live and learn and try to move on....

Thanks for listening. I needed to unload that for some reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I am unhappy I don't usually go for food....it is very strange. I am the opposite, when I am down in the dumps I can careless about eating and I don't even feel hungry some of the times.

I have been working out at home a bit. I would like to work on my stomach and my thighs....those seem to appear the largest to me when I look in the mirror.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


Wow, (celiac-mommy) what an inciteful story..thanks so much for sharing. I can not say I have had the same "type" of struggle but I can definately relate to how it was for you growing up. I am the youngest of 3 and my older sister was always the tiny one. My parents used to call me "hot dog" when I was a kid because I literally looked like I was 3rd world skinny...unhealthy and not good until I hit puberity...thats when the weight stuck to me. My sister was a runner and had a beautiful physique. I trained as a cheerleader but always felt bigger than everyone..puffy and not the cute tiny one. My mom is very overweight and would always praise my sister for being so small and defined. She had all the cute clothes and seemingly perfect friends, boyfriends, and life. Me on the other hand, I was somewhat an odd ball with a big mouth! If my mom offended me in any way about my weight....she definately knew. I was lucky in a sense that I always thought I was a very attractive person and regardless of the hits I took about my weight I remained as confident as I could be. Its hard being a girl in this world!!! I think my sense of self is what kept me afloat and not into eating disorders or a troublesome self image. Now, 5 years later, my mom knows it was due to my undiagnosed Celiac Disease that I was a super skinny at one point and then puffy and strangely bloated the rest of my life. It will take some work to get my body back to where I want it to be..I just need to find my happy medium. When I try to stay good for awhile it ends up backfiring. I just need to write it all down and stick to the plan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am a college student and work full time...needless to say I have a super busy life so sometimes it seems impossible to be on the run and eat small meals frequently.

When Opera lost all of her weight she didn't eat a single thing after 7pm...why cant I do that?!!?!?!?

If you're on the run something small like an apple and piece of string cheese is a good snack that's easy to take with you and doesn't require a microwave. (Hoping you're not dairy-free here :))

You said you're a college student so not eating after 7pm may not be realistic for you. If you eat dinner around 5 or 6pm and are up studying until midnight or 2am, you will need another "dinner" around 10pm. The guideline is eat every four hours. The 7pm rule works well for people who go to bed around 10pm. The point of the 7pm rule is to eliminate nighttime grazing on junk food. I used to feel guilty making myself a second dinner, but now I know that much more healthy to do that than to snack all night.

Lifting weights can really help drop pounds, too. A pound of muscle burns 50cals/day whereas fat burns nothing. You gain a few pounds of muscle and you'll be burning a lot of extra calories without having to do anything extra.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

My suggestion would be to try Weight watchers, you can pick what you want to eat and it is not expensive. I think 900 calories a day is way too low. Your body goes into starvation mode and then tries to hold onto everything you have incase it happens again.

The sugar thing also is a factor as you eat sugar you crave more sugar. Make sure that you are not thirsty before you eat and try not to eat processed sugar for a couple days and see if that makes a difference.

But really WW is a great resource and you can even do everything online. I have lost 30lbs with WW and still counting.

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A woman at my work joined WW a year ago and asked me to join with her...I would be all for it but it was too expensive for my budget at the time. I have heard a lot of great things about it...how the points work and the support that is available..this is a great idea! Glad to hear you have been so successful on it...

I am off to a good start though I have been to the gym taking classes for the last 2 days...it was intense but I cant wait for the next class...but my problem is that I am doing it before work in the morning.

Now for me (I work retail) and my schedule is always changing but the days that I get off at night weather it be 9p,10p or even 12am, I go home and think I should eat (not out of hunger). When I used to work out after work I was very successful with my night cravings because after burning cals you dont want to go put them all right back...especially that late at night. Now I love the classes before work and dont want to change that so I need help after I get off work to control myself to not go crazy.

I am thinking about buying some king of workout video that I can do to keep me active, busy and away from the food!! Or maybe even a good strtching yoga video...I just need to be pre occupied. Ha ha I have even thought about meditation....any suggestions??

-Staci

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Now, 5 years later, my mom knows it was due to my undiagnosed Celiac Disease that I was a super skinny at one point and then puffy and strangely bloated the rest of my life.

-Staci

Staci,

Sounds like you just hit my life story, I was grossly skinny, My family would make fun of my, when we were camping, they would tell me not to about being eaten by wildlife, they would say the bear would use me as a toothpick..just little things like that, then in jr high, we had a party because i actually broke 100 lbs....i didnt gain weight until about 15, but once it was there it wouldnt go away, i got made fun of for being "fat" although i never wieghed more than 145 lbs. I am 5'5. so its a lil big, but by no means was i "fat." Now I stay between 130 and 140, and even when i wiegh 145 my friends still say i look amazing.

Since being gluten free I have not put on pounds, I watch what I eat, sticking to fruits and meats, and rice cakes.. I would say I am not a person who works out, I take the dogs for a walk at least 2 times a week, not alot but that is my exorcise, and i sit at a desk all day.

I think the thing is that now i just pay attention to what I take in, because I do not want to gain the weight again....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

0

  • Who's Online   4 Members, 0 Anonymous, 321 Guests (See full list)

  • Top Posters +

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like.
    Ingredients:
    1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar  Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions:
    Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender.
    Dish into bowls.
    Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. 
    Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence.
    The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow.
    To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center.
    Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification.
    Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.”
    Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.”
    Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities.
    Read more.

    Zyana Morris
    Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. 
    While it may not sound like a severe complication at first, coeliac can be unpleasant to deal with. What’s worse is it would lower your body’s capacity to absorb minerals and vitamins. Naturally, the condition would cause nutritional deficiencies. The key problem that diagnosing celiac is difficult and takes take longer than usual. Surprisingly, the condition has over 200 identified symptoms.
    More than three million people suffer from the coeliac disease in the United States alone. Even though diagnosis is complicated, there are symptoms that can help you identify the condition during the early stages to minimize the damage. 
    Here is how you can recognize the main symptoms of celiac disease:
    Diarrhea
    In various studies conducted over years, the most prominent symptom of celiac disease is chronic diarrhea.
    People suffering from the condition would experience loose watery stools that can last for up to four weeks after they stop taking gluten. Diarrhea can also be a symptom of food poisoning and other conditions, which is why it makes it difficult to diagnose coeliac. In certain cases, celiac disease can take up to four years to establish a sound diagnosis.
    Vomiting
    Another prominent symptom is vomiting.  
    When accompanied by diarrhea, vomiting can be a painful experience that would leave you exhausted. It also results in malnutrition and the patient experiences weight loss (not in a good way though). If you experience uncontrolled vomiting, report the matter to a physician to manage the condition.
    Bloating
    Since coeliac disease damages the small intestine, bloating is another common system. This is due to inflammation of the digestive tract. In a study with more than a 1,000 participants, almost 73% of the people reported bloating after ingesting gluten. 
    Bloating can be managed by eliminating gluten from the diet which is why a gluten-free diet is necessary for people suffering from celiac disease.
    Fatigue
    Constant feeling of tiredness and low energy levels is another common symptom associated with celiac disease. If you experience a lack of energy after in taking gluten, then you need to consult a physician to diagnose the condition. Now fatigue can also result from inefficient thyroid function, infections, and depression (a symptom of the coeliac disease). However, almost 51% of celiac patients suffer from fatigue in a study.
    Itchy Rash
    Now the chances of getting a rash after eating gluten are slim, but the symptom has been associated with celiac disease in the past. The condition can cause dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes a blistering skin rash that occurs around the buttocks, knees, and elbows. 
    A study found out that almost 17% of patients suffering from celiac disease might develop dermatitis herpetiformis due to lack of right treatment. Make sure you schedule an online appointment with your dermatologist or visit the nearest healthcare facility to prevent worsening of symptoms.
    Even with such common symptoms, diagnosing the condition is imperative for a quick recovery and to mitigate the long-term risks associated with celiac disease. 
    Sources:
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  mendfamily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/16/2018 - Galectins are a family of animal lectins marked by their affinity for N-acetyllactosamine-enriched glycoconjugates. Galectins control several immune cell processes and influence both innate and adaptive immune responses. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the role of galectins, particularly galectin-1 (Gal-1), in the treatment of celiac disease.
    The research team included Victoria Sundblad, Amado A. Quintar, Luciano G. Morosi, Sonia I. Niveloni, Ana Cabanne, Edgardo Smecuol, Eduardo Mauriño, Karina V. Mariño, Julio C. Bai, Cristina A. Maldonado, and Gabriel A. Rabinovich.
    The researchers examined the role of galectins in intestinal inflammation, particularly in Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease patients, as well as in murine models resembling these inflammatory conditions. 
    Maintaining the fine balance between host immunity and tolerance promotes gut homeostasis, and helps to prevent inflammation. To gain insight into the role of Gal-1 in celiac patients, the team demonstrated an increase in Gal-1 expression following a gluten-free diet along with an increase in the frequency of Foxp3+ cells. 
    The resolution of the inflammatory response may promote the recovery process, leading to a reversal of gut damage and a regeneration of villi. Among other things, the team’s findings support the use of Gal-1 agonists to treat severe mucosal inflammation. In addition, Gal-1 may serve as a potential biomarker to follow the progression of celiac disease treatment.
    Gut inflammation may be governed by a coordinated network of galectins and their glycosylated ligands, triggering either anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory responses. That network may influence the interplay between intestinal epithelial cells and the highly specialized gut immune system in physiologic and pathologic settings.
    The team’s results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory and tolerogenic response associated with gluten-free diet in celiac patients is matched by a substantial up-regulation of Gal-1. This suggests a major role of this lectin in favoring resolution of inflammation and restoration of mucosal homeostasis. 
    This data highlights the regulated expression of galectin-1 (Gal-1), a proto-type member of the galectin family, during intestinal inflammation in untreated and treated celiac patients. Further study of this area could lead to better understanding of the mechanisms behind celiac disease, and potentially to a treatment of the disease.
    Source:
    Front. Immunol., 01 March 2018.  
    The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Laboratorio de Inmunopatología, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Centro de Microscopía Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina; the Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud (INICSA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Córdoba, Argentina; the Laboratorio de Glicómica Funcional y Molecular, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME), Consejo de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Sección Intestino Delgado, Departamento de Medicina, Hospital de Gastroenterología Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo, Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Unidad de Patología, Hospital de Gastroenterología, Bonorino Udaondo, Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Instituto de Investigaciones, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina; and the Departamento de Química Biológica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/15/2018 - There is a good amount of anecdotal evidence that people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity can tolerate sourdough bread, but there is no good science to support such claims. To determine if sourdough bread help conquer wheat sensitivity, the Alberta Wheat Commission (AWC) is funding a team of researchers to see if the sourdough fermentation process can reduce or eliminate wheat components that trigger wheat sensitivity.
    The project will study the way the sourdough bread fermentation process breaks down proteins and carbohydrates in wheat flour.
    Chair of the AWC Research Committee, Terry Young, said new research suggests that wheat protein may not be the cause of gluten sensitivity in people without celiac disease. Longer fermentation, aka sourdough fermentation, is more common in Europe. Young says that reports indicate that “incidents of non-celiac sensitivity…are actually lower in Europe." He adds the current research will focus on the fermentation, but the future may include the development of wheat varieties for gluten sensitive individuals.
    The research will be led by food microbiologist at the University of Alberta, Dr. Michael Gänzle, who said the use of sourdough bread in industrial baking reduces ingredient costs and can improve the quality of bread as well.
    Dr. Gänzle wants to assess anecdotal claims that people with non-celiac wheat or gluten intolerance can tolerate sourdough bread. His team wants to “determine whether fermentation reduces or eliminates individual wheat components that are known or suspected to cause adverse effects.”
    The team readily admits that their project will not create products that are safe for people with celiac disease. They may, however, create products that are useful for people without celiac disease, but who are gluten sensitivity.
    The AWC is collaboratively funding the project with the Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission, and the Minnesota Wheat Research Promotion Council, which will contribute $57,250, and $20,000, respectively. The research team will issue a report of its findings after the project is completed in 2021.
    Studies like this are important to shed light on the differences between celiac and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Stay tuned for more developments in this exciting area of research.
    Source:
    highriveronline.com