Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

ElseB

Practical Backpacking Tips?

Recommended Posts

Does anyone have any practical travelling tips? I've been reading crazy tips like bring your own breadmaker and toaster, ship things to yourself at your destination. I'm going backing packing in Australia, New Zealand and Europe for 6 months and will be staying mainly in hostels, and moving frequently. None of those tips are very practical. I've also heard people saying that its easy to find gluten-free products in these countries, but then I"ve also seen numerous posts from people who are travelling there and can't find any food! I'm worried about how to get carbs, without travelling with a sack of rice in my luggage.

To make matters worse, I was only just diagnosed this month, and leave in a month. I"m starting to think I should just cancel the whole trip because its so overwhelming.

Does anyone have any advice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Does anyone have any practical travelling tips? I've been reading crazy tips like bring your own breadmaker and toaster, ship things to yourself at your destination. I'm going backing packing in Australia, New Zealand and Europe for 6 months and will be staying mainly in hostels, and moving frequently. None of those tips are very practical. I've also heard people saying that its easy to find gluten-free products in these countries, but then I"ve also seen numerous posts from people who are travelling there and can't find any food! I'm worried about how to get carbs, without travelling with a sack of rice in my luggage.

To make matters worse, I was only just diagnosed this month, and leave in a month. I"m starting to think I should just cancel the whole trip because its so overwhelming.

Does anyone have any advice?

To tell you the truth, you're going to have to pack food in your backpack just in case you can't find food. I haven't traveled to Australia or New Zealand, so I can't say for those places. I have only traveled in Italy since going gluten-free and it wasn't hard to find gluten-free food to eat, but I went to sit-down restaurants and resigned to spending money on steak and that sort of thing. It's hard to grab quick "street food" that's gluten free, or at least it is in Italy. Trail mix is easy to pack, of course. Nuts, dried fruit, Lara bars (and I hear Clif Nectar is a new line of gluten-free bars that are tasty), fruit cups, are easy to pack. For carbs/energy, there are gluten-free pretzels that travel well, bag up some gluten-free dry cereal, rice/flax seed crackers, that sort of thing. It won't be easy, but I don't think you'll need to cancel the trip.

I was freaking out before my trip to Italy because I was still not feeling well (at all!) and the whole finding food outside of my home bit was really overwhelming and intimidating. Just plan ahead. Bring enough food with you to anticipate not being able to find food, but also realize that there are little markets with fruit and veggies all over the place. Carbs will take some planning ahead. Head to Whole Foods, buy some serving size baggies, and prepare to spend a whole lot of money on gluten-free version of normal snack foods, and you'll be all set. In fact, if you have a Whole Foods near you, the staff there are usually really knowledgable and helpful and you can set up a tour of the store with them showing you gluten-free items to buy and pack.

Sorry, that was long! Good luck! Wish I could come!

~Sally

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does anyone have any practical travelling tips? I've been reading crazy tips like bring your own breadmaker and toaster, ship things to yourself at your destination. I'm going backing packing in Australia, New Zealand and Europe for 6 months and will be staying mainly in hostels, and moving frequently. None of those tips are very practical. I've also heard people saying that its easy to find gluten-free products in these countries, but then I"ve also seen numerous posts from people who are travelling there and can't find any food! I'm worried about how to get carbs, without travelling with a sack of rice in my luggage.

To make matters worse, I was only just diagnosed this month, and leave in a month. I"m starting to think I should just cancel the whole trip because its so overwhelming.

Does anyone have any advice?

Ooooh, I've backpacked around Australia. It's very doable. When you get there, see if you can find a Coles or a Woolworths, and purchase a cooler bag (they're a few bucks - and about the size of a paper grocery bag). Fill it with things like peanut butter, Corn Thins, fruit, cans of tuna, Leeda bars, cans of beans, pre-cooked rice in microwavable bags, Orgran products etc. etc. If you throw a bag of frozen fruit in there, it will keep things cold for several hours.

It also helps to have some olive oil, salt and pepper, paper plates and eating utensils. Basically, every time you're at a stop with a grocery store, make sure to replenish your food bag.

If you're in a hostel, hard boiled eggs and fruit always makes a good breakfast, you can find gluten-free pasta everywhere (even in the tiniest of towns), and just stick to simple foods (garbanzo beans with veggies and olive oil, or steamed veggies and a potato cooked in a microwavable zip lock steam bag, with some tuna on the side for protein). I did occasionally use cookware in hostels, but only the stainless steel stuff (I just washed it very well before I used it).

I think it was me who posted that I couldn't find food there...I was having one frustrating jet-lagged day, but really, you will be fine.

Let me know if you have questions about specific places.


"Let food be thy medicine, and let thy medicine be food." - Hippocrates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I set out on a three month backpacking trip across Europe 3 months into a gluten free diet. I stopped at the grocery store nearly everyday and bought a days worth of food. In Europe most of the grocery stores are in the basements of the department stores. I ate a lot of yogurt, cheese, fruit, vegtables, juice and chocolate. Also, many of the major train stations have stores that sell fresh food.

In England ask if the grocery store has a "Free from" section, not all do. You can buy gluten free bread to put PB & J on. I agree with Mango04 bring along you own knife, fork, spoon and plate. You will need them when eating food purchased from grocery stores.

Pack along a small mat of blue ice and a small softsided lunch box. In a hostel with a kitchen you should be able to refreeze the blue ice wrapped in a paper towel. In addition to my backpack, I had a large purse with a shoulder strap the held my food and utensils.

Lastly, research the french fries from McDonald's in the various countries. I believe, I read that the french fries, including the oil, which has caused such controversy in the US, are gluten free in other countries. It is worth looking into because McDonald's are everywhere in Europe.

Have a super trip.


Phyllis

Gluten Free - 30 years

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't backpacked since being dx with Celiac but thought I would chip in and say that Australia is fairly Celiac aware these days. Most backpackers are in big cities, and near grocery stores and shopping malls - where gluten-free food, fruit and veges can be found. The ones in Adelaide are near Central Market where there are asian , italian and indian food galore. I have never had any trouble finding something to eat there and there is a stall that sells yummy savoury slices, and sweet cakes as well.

This list may be helpful for you. http://members.ozemail.com.au/~coeliac/dine.html

Also McDonalds has safe options. The chips are gluten-free ( ask for a dedicated fryer) and the beef patties are 100% beef too so you can have the burger without the bun ( put into a packing box) with all the normal salad. That is the same Australia wide. All foods are labelled in Australia by law, and if they contain wheat /gluten- they must state this on the label.And in Adelaide the Coeliac Society has its own shop that sells food to members - not sure but they may for travellers as well and other states are probably the same. http://www.coeliac.org.au/ St Balflours have a great range of meals in a tin which are gluten-free and they are found in all supermarkets if you get tired of chocolate and fruit and pretzels.. You will probably have to carry food with you , and also may have to eat at restaurants more often than normal - but apart from that you should be fine.


Diagnosed May 2006 - Hashimotos Thyroid after being diagnosed in 1977 and told it didn't matter.

Diagnosed June 2006 with adrenal insufficiency.

Diagnosed June 2006 as Gluten Intolerant after I failed the Challenge Diet. Negative blood test.No biopsy.

Diagnosed June 2006 as B12 low. Needed weekly injections for a year.Still have them every 2 weeks.

Trialled Dairy Free Diet and reacted positively to that challenge in January 07.

News Flash! Coeliac Genetic Testing done April 08 . DQ2 Positive !

Diagnosed July 2010 FODMAP. Limits on Fructose, lactose, polyols, fructans. NO ONION! But I can have hard cheese, butter and cream again!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ooooh, I've backpacked around Australia. It's very doable. When you get there, see if you can find a Coles or a Woolworths, and purchase a cooler bag (they're a few bucks - and about the size of a paper grocery bag). Fill it with things like peanut butter, Corn Thins, fruit, cans of tuna, Leeda bars, cans of beans, pre-cooked rice in microwavable bags, Orgran products etc. etc. If you throw a bag of frozen fruit in there, it will keep things cold for several hours.

It also helps to have some olive oil, salt and pepper, paper plates and eating utensils. Basically, every time you're at a stop with a grocery store, make sure to replenish your food bag.

If you're in a hostel, hard boiled eggs and fruit always makes a good breakfast, you can find gluten-free pasta everywhere (even in the tiniest of towns), and just stick to simple foods (garbanzo beans with veggies and olive oil, or steamed veggies and a potato cooked in a microwavable zip lock steam bag, with some tuna on the side for protein). I did occasionally use cookware in hostels, but only the stainless steel stuff (I just washed it very well before I used it).

I think it was me who posted that I couldn't find food there...I was having one frustrating jet-lagged day, but really, you will be fine.

Let me know if you have questions about specific places.

Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!!!! I"m feeling much better now!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Diagnosed May 2006 - Hashimotos Thyroid after being diagnosed in 1977 and told it didn't matter.

Diagnosed June 2006 with adrenal insufficiency.

Diagnosed June 2006 as Gluten Intolerant after I failed the Challenge Diet. Negative blood test.No biopsy.

Diagnosed June 2006 as B12 low. Needed weekly injections for a year.Still have them every 2 weeks.

Trialled Dairy Free Diet and reacted positively to that challenge in January 07.

News Flash! Coeliac Genetic Testing done April 08 . DQ2 Positive !

Diagnosed July 2010 FODMAP. Limits on Fructose, lactose, polyols, fructans. NO ONION! But I can have hard cheese, butter and cream again!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a thread I was looking for.

I was actually thinking of starting one myself til I found this.

I find the gluten free diet easy for the most part, while having a home and cooking everything myself.

But come next spring at the latest Im quitting my job and giving up my apartment to take a year or more off

to travel, do volunteer work, visit friends, etc. Im gonna be traveling with nothing but the pack on my back

the whole time, so it's gonna be hard. I may have to walk long distances, hike, camp, etc.

Im really worried about how I'm going to get by.

If I wasn't a vegetarian it wouldn't be so bad as I would have a lot more options (plain steaks and what not) but my only main source of protien is quinoa, beans and rice. This would be ok if anything was PURE, as I could

get rice and beans at most restaurants, Im just scared the rice will have some sort of flavoring.

The stopping at supermarkets for peanut butter and fruit and stuff is a good idea. I need one

of those cooler bags!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites