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Matt'sMom

Newly Diagnosed 9 Yr. Old Depressed

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My son is being bullied at lunch because he can't have what others eat. He stands up for himself but he is getting tired. He now hated school. He says he is a freak and don't want to live like this. I encourage him to explain his illness so others will know that he is the same preson that he has always been. Thank you :D for this website. Sometimes it is hard when you have no one to talk to that understand the situation. New comer hope this came out right. PLEASE GIVE ME MORE IDEAS ON HOW YOU HANDLED A SIMULAR SITUATION. HELP NEEDED!!!

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Your son's school should be alerted to this asap : his teacher, then the counselor and then the principal. He should not be allowed to be bullied. My son is just one of many children with dietary restrictions at his school; see if your son's teacher would let the two of you (it will be intimidating alone) do a short presentation about celiac. Emphasize the HUGE number of celiacs out there. Show them this site. If he's a sports nut, point out that Keith Olberman (former ESPN commentator now on MSNBC) is celiac! (If the school is full of boneheads, then send your son with lunch that includes, but is not limited to, skittles, hershey bars, and other lovely treats that the regular lunch eaters cannot have with THEIR lunch. Another good strategy is for him to bring in gluten-free snack for the class, like George' brownies, etc. Expensive but well worth the investment to alter perceptions )

How long has he been diagnosed? It is really common to grieve and be depressed for a while. Others might disagree, but I think it's VITAL that you, and other adults around him, don't pity him. Too much sympathy reinforces the idea in his head that he is a freak. List everything he can have. Make it an adventure to find new food. Allow him to throw stuff out he hates. Eat gluten-free food with him so he feels less isolated. But DONT pity him!

And lastly, send him to the teen section of this site. Give him a log-in identity, and let him meet the other kids here. He is SO not alone! SO not a freak!

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ryebaby has some great points! My dd feels 'different' and chooses not to really discuss the celiac disease with kids at school--for her own reasons, which she would really rather not discuss with me...She's not being bullied, I think she doesn't want to bring attention to the fact that she's at all different from the other kids.. But in our house, my dh and I also eat gluten-free, we focus on all the stuff she CAN eat and not what she can't. I look at the school lunch menu and try to make things similar, there are a lot of kids who bring cold lunch, so there's quite a variety. I also take her to the grocery store, let her look thru cookbooks with me and plan meals. I think by letting her dictate what she brings to school, there's less conflict, it's what she WANTS to eat. I frequently bring food into her class (and I keep in mind all the kids with food allergies-which I wish more parents would do, but that's another topic), so all the kids love the cookies and cupcakes I bring in for them and I love to see her beam when I bring them in! I do agree though, for sure you need to talk to the school about the bullying--it's UNACCEPTALE no matter what!! Good luck with everything.

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Your son's school should be alerted to this asap : his teacher, then the counselor and then the principal. He should not be allowed to be bullied. My son is just one of many children with dietary restrictions at his school; see if your son's teacher would let the two of you (it will be intimidating alone) do a short presentation about celiac. Emphasize the HUGE number of celiacs out there. Show them this site. If he's a sports nut, point out that Keith Olberman (former ESPN commentator now on MSNBC) is celiac! (If the school is full of boneheads, then send your son with lunch that includes, but is not limited to, skittles, hershey bars, and other lovely treats that the regular lunch eaters cannot have with THEIR lunch. Another good strategy is for him to bring in gluten-free snack for the class, like George' brownies, etc. Expensive but well worth the investment to alter perceptions )

How long has he been diagnosed? It is really common to grieve and be depressed for a while. Others might disagree, but I think it's VITAL that you, and other adults around him, don't pity him. Too much sympathy reinforces the idea in his head that he is a freak. List everything he can have. Make it an adventure to find new food. Allow him to throw stuff out he hates. Eat gluten-free food with him so he feels less isolated. But DONT pity him!

And lastly, send him to the teen section of this site. Give him a log-in identity, and let him meet the other kids here. He is SO not alone! SO not a freak!

Thank you first of all. He was diagnosed on 01/22/08. I have taken many of those steps. I did not think of the presentation. Great idea :D , I also never knew of the sports personality. I will buy the brownied asap. We have a field trip planed for the best food store on town (that's what I call it, when I tell him) Home Econimist. He calls it HIS special store just for him. That comment is meant to make his brother jealous :) . We do not pity him but we let those that need to know know. We are in process of making whole house gluten-free. Who sells Georges Brownies?

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ryebaby has some great points! My dd feels 'different' and chooses not to really discuss the celiac disease with kids at school--for her own reasons, which she would really rather not discuss with me...She's not being bullied, I think she doesn't want to bring attention to the fact that she's at all different from the other kids.. But in our house, my dh and I also eat gluten-free, we focus on all the stuff she CAN eat and not what she can't. I look at the school lunch menu and try to make things similar, there are a lot of kids who bring cold lunch, so there's quite a variety. I also take her to the grocery store, let her look thru cookbooks with me and plan meals. I think by letting her dictate what she brings to school, there's less conflict, it's what she WANTS to eat. I frequently bring food into her class (and I keep in mind all the kids with food allergies-which I wish more parents would do, but that's another topic), so all the kids love the cookies and cupcakes I bring in for them and I love to see her beam when I bring them in! I do agree though, for sure you need to talk to the school about the bullying--it's UNACCEPTALE no matter what!! Good luck with everything.

I must admit sometimes I do over react when I catch him eating an unacceptable food choice that he got from someone else. But we (his big bro. and I) try to focus on the CAN and not the can't menu. He was diag. on 01/22/08, we are new to this and looking at it as just another adventure and not a tragedy. This attitude really helps him. I will take your idea and try to taylor lunches to the school menu as closely as possible. I hope by this time next month that we are doing as well of a job as you and your family are doing with this. Best wishes to you and your daughter :)

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I must admit sometimes I do over react when I catch him eating an unacceptable food choice that he got from someone else. But we (his big bro. and I) try to focus on the CAN and not the can't menu. He was diag. on 01/22/08, we are new to this and looking at it as just another adventure and not a tragedy. This attitude really helps him. I will take your idea and try to taylor lunches to the school menu as closely as possible. I hope by this time next month that we are doing as well of a job as you and your family are doing with this. Best wishes to you and your daughter :)

I know it's totally overwhelming at first, but it does get easier each day. Before you know it, it will be 2nd nature to all of you. One day at a time and take advantage of all of us here--as we will of you ;) We were diagnosed 1/06 (I say we because it really is a family venture). It was crazy at first, our 1st trip to the natural food store here was ~$350, we bought one of everything that was gluten-free, figured out that most of the stuff tasted like crap, found what we did like, learned a new way of cooking and honestly, it's hard to remember the days when we didn't have to worry about it. I have to say that my dd is one of the healthiest kids I've ever seen (now). Her immune system is so strong, she's grown so much and is doing so well. I thank God (and our pediatrician) every day for healing her as fast as they did. I wish nothing but the best for your son and your family!

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I know it's totally overwhelming at first, but it does get easier each day. Before you know it, it will be 2nd nature to all of you. One day at a time and take advantage of all of us here--as we will of you ;) We were diagnosed 1/06 (I say we because it really is a family venture). It was crazy at first, our 1st trip to the natural food store here was ~$350, we bought one of everything that was gluten-free, figured out that most of the stuff tasted like crap, found what we did like, learned a new way of cooking and honestly, it's hard to remember the days when we didn't have to worry about it. I have to say that my dd is one of the healthiest kids I've ever seen (now). Her immune system is so strong, she's grown so much and is doing so well. I thank God (and our pediatrician) every day for healing her as fast as they did. I wish nothing but the best for your son and your family!

I bet the natural food store wrote your name down after the first shopping spree :D . We try to take every opportunity to smile and laugh the way we did before this. Laughter helps to keep this from being a tragic story or a poor me situation. All a pity party will bring me more people who are unable to help me tactfully. So we look forward to each day as chefs creation new recipes. He has always cooked with me as my junior chef. HE HAS ALWAYS WANTED TO BE A CHEF COOKING FOR HUNDREDS EVERY DAY. Now he would also include those who really need alternative food options. With people in this world like you Rachael, this world of Celiac is a easier place to live. THANKS!!!

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[ He has always cooked with me as my junior chef. HE HAS ALWAYS WANTED TO BE A CHEF COOKING FOR HUNDREDS EVERY DAY. Now he would also include those who really need alternative food options. With people in this world like you Rachael, this world of Celiac is a easier place to live. THANKS!!!

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My son is being bullied at lunch because he can't have what others eat. He stands up for himself but he is getting tired. He now hated school. He says he is a freak and don't want to live like this. I encourage him to explain his illness so others will know that he is the same preson that he has always been. Thank you :D for this website. Sometimes it is hard when you have no one to talk to that understand the situation. New comer hope this came out right. PLEASE GIVE ME MORE IDEAS ON HOW YOU HANDLED A SIMULAR SITUATION. HELP NEEDED!!!

This probably won't be a popular response but .....

The way I dealt with bullies at school (somehow always being the 2nd shortest in my year - we now know why with th celiac disease) is quite simple .. HURT them ... Bullies don't like being hurt which is why they pick on people that don't fight back ... fight back and make sure you hurt them even if you get hurt worse and they won't try again! Neither will he have to do it often... bullies usually target the people who they know don't fight back ... the diet is simply an excuse ...

Unfortunately they will still be bullies and will simply transfer their bullying to someone else ... but it does solve Matt's problem.

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[ He has always cooked with me as my junior chef. HE HAS ALWAYS WANTED TO BE A CHEF COOKING FOR HUNDREDS EVERY DAY. Now he would also include those who really need alternative food options. With people in this world like you Rachael, this world of Celiac is a easier place to live. THANKS!!!

He needs to meet my 14 year old, who wants to be a cook! We are scheduling for high school (which has a culinary arts dept.) and I wondered aloud "I wonder how we can get around all the flour there" and he said

"oh mom, if you want something bad enough, there's always a way" :)

He cooks two nights a week, from Rachel Ray's 30 -minute menu cookbook -- tonight I think he's making shrimp. I said I hadn't ever cooked shrimp, and he said "well, we'll figure it out, and if it is awful, we'll just make pizza, too"

anyway --- you are doing so incredibly well for being newly diagnosed! Wow! I'm so impressed! hang in there :)

Thanks, I am not always as strong as I appear. When he cries It breaks my heart. Then I have to remind myself be strong for him. It seems that you have a budding chef on your hand. B) I tried to find an elementary that teaches cooking here but there is no such place :( . My nine wants to be a chef but my 13 he is in art school and he creates his own recipes all the time. The joke at home is that the 9 told the 13 that he can come live with him and he will feed him when he is a starving artist. :lol: He was serious and said it with such love and then he hugged him.

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Have him try some of these recipes:

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?showtopic=42132

They're some of my tried and true, and ones my DD loves. There's also one that I posted for a coffee cake that is TDF!! (you can also make it into cupcakes)

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?showtopic=42461

Have fun with it!

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My son was diagnosed at age 10. At first he did not want anyone to know about his Celiac (I started with just informing the teachers, school nurse, administrators, etc.) Then gradually he told a couple of close friends, then more until he became comfortable talking about it.

I think what helped my son most was not trying to convert the whole class at once (although sending gluten-free treats is a great idea). I would encourage my son to have a buddy or two come over to play or spend the night. I would make lots of good homemade gluten-free stuff for the boys to eat - pizza for dinner, chocolate chip cookies or brownies for desert, waffles or pancakes for breakfast. It made both me and my son feel great to know that his non-Celiac friends thought the gluten-free food tasted great and wasn't weird or gross. By doing this a kid or two at a time, my son developed advocates who would stick up for him at school, and we turned the momentum in our favor. Now it's to the point where his friends and also my daughter's friends (non of whom have Celiac) ask me to make those yummy gluten-free cookies or waffles or whatever.

I also make sure to sign up to send treats for a couple of school parties each year and also his birthday, and EVERYONE loves them.

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I'm sorry your son is having to deal with that! That would break my heart, too. The first 6 months or so are really hard, because you are still trying to figure out how to eat. My first few months I ate carrots, chicken, and little else...I thought for sure my son and I would never eat a donut or cookie again! It's been 3 years, and at my son's 11th birthday party last week one of the kids said that the cupcakes I made were the best she'd ever eaten...and nobody knew they were gluten free! It really does get better. Some "cool" lunch options:

tuna fish or lunch meat (check for gluten, Hormel has some good lunch meats w/o gluten or nitrates but it doesn't *look* any healthier than usual), Lighthouse Blu Cheese dressing (or origional Hidden Valley Ranch) and lettuce rolled in a brown rice tortilla. Or, make a couple of quesidillas one day and cut them into wedges, and send a few in his lunch during the week.

Gluten free bagel pizza...Kinnikinnik and Glutano have good bagels. I split one, put squeezable pizza sauce on it, Hormel Turkey Pepperoni and a slice of cheese, then toast it in the toaster oven.

gluten-free bagels and cream cheese. You can get the Kraft cream cheese in a foil pack or small container, then he can put it on himself like a Lunchable. Add lunch meat if you want.

Many brands of fruit snacks are gluten-free, Kraft is good at labeling their snacks.

Kraft brand puddings are often gluten-free, again you will be able to tell by reading the label. Those single serving puddings (even off brands are often gluten-free) and Jello snacks are often gluten-free.

Little cans or plastic cups of fruit.

Yogurt...check Yoplait brand. Avoid the Dannon stuff with probiotics, my son and I were glutened wtih them!

Kinnikinnik makes "K toos" cookies which are absolutely identical to OREOS and look very normal. YUMMY!

Small packages of carrots with ranch dressing

Glutano makes a cracker that is similar to a Ritz, you can make peanut butter crackers with these and they look and taste normal.

snack sized Snickers are gluten-free, or the regular sized Reeses peanut butter cups (NOT the mini sized, but the single package with a regular sized cup). Diddo M&M's (not the crispy kind) and everything in a Hershey's chocolate bar grab bag EXCEPT the Krackle (you might want to double check that, as they may have added another non gluten-free bar since I bought them last!).

There's a gluten-free power bar type chocolate granola thing that's really tasty...Zone Bar, I think it's called. There are several flavors, and all of them might not be gluten-free...but check and see. The other advantage to these is if your child needs to gain weight, they are full of protein and add a lot of fiber and calories as a snack.

Kinnikinnik has yummy donuts, in several flavors. They pack about a zillion calories per bite, but taste good!

Amy's brand has a gluten free rice mac and cheese which is microwaveable. There are also some "Nuke-meals" made for kids that are gluten free with things like mac and cheese, chicken nuggets, etc. although I've never tried them. Can't remember the brand name.

Cheetos are gluten-free, so you could put the little snack bags in his lunch. Also, Lay's STAX brand chips are gluten-free (although check each label just in case).

Hopefully this will help...lunch is one of the most difficult things to solve, especially school lunch. We eat very healthy usually at home, but I can see that if/when my kids go to school there might be a need for some more socially acceptable food, and I guess I'll probably allow it since they do eat well most of the time. My kids are currently homeschooled, but I'm sure I'll have to deal with sack lunches eventually! Also, public schools hire a nutritionist to put together their menus. You can check with the school and talk to the person in charge, and they should be able to tell you what is OK in the school's hot lunches. Proceed with caution, though...and expect there to not be many days that he can do hot lunch. It's a somewhat risky option, but if it would help him feel more "normal' to eat hot lunch every now and then it might be worth a phone call!

Best of luck to you, and (((hugs))) to your son. It's miserable when your kid is having problems like that...my son has Celiac's AND has just been dx'd with acid reflux, so feeding him is very challenging and some days I really feel overwhelmed. The gluten free thing does get better, though!

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Have him try some of these recipes:

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?showtopic=42132

They're some of my tried and true, and ones my DD loves. There's also one that I posted for a coffee cake that is TDF!! (you can also make it into cupcakes)

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?showtopic=42461

Have fun with it!

Thanks sooooo much!!! I ran of to print them, I was like a kid in a candy store :lol:

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My son was diagnosed at age 10. At first he did not want anyone to know about his Celiac (I started with just informing the teachers, school nurse, administrators, etc.) Then gradually he told a couple of close friends, then more until he became comfortable talking about it.

I think what helped my son most was not trying to convert the whole class at once (although sending gluten-free treats is a great idea). I would encourage my son to have a buddy or two come over to play or spend the night. I would make lots of good homemade gluten-free stuff for the boys to eat - pizza for dinner, chocolate chip cookies or brownies for desert, waffles or pancakes for breakfast. It made both me and my son feel great to know that his non-Celiac friends thought the gluten-free food tasted great and wasn't weird or gross. By doing this a kid or two at a time, my son developed advocates who would stick up for him at school, and we turned the momentum in our favor. Now it's to the point where his friends and also my daughter's friends (non of whom have Celiac) ask me to make those yummy gluten-free cookies or waffles or whatever.

I also make sure to sign up to send treats for a couple of school parties each year and also his birthday, and EVERYONE loves them.

Thank you, the support on this site is amazing, and the ideas wow. I wish I could carry this site with me everywhere. I love your idea of picking a few close friends at a time. Cause now the kids act like he has 2 heads. Thx :)

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I'm sorry your son is having to deal with that! That would break my heart, too. The first 6 months or so are really hard, because you are still trying to figure out how to eat. My first few months I ate carrots, chicken, and little else...I thought for sure my son and I would never eat a donut or cookie again! It's been 3 years, and at my son's 11th birthday party last week one of the kids said that the cupcakes I made were the best she'd ever eaten...and nobody knew they were gluten free! It really does get better. Some "cool" lunch options:

tuna fish or lunch meat (check for gluten, Hormel has some good lunch meats w/o gluten or nitrates but it doesn't *look* any healthier than usual), Lighthouse Blu Cheese dressing (or origional Hidden Valley Ranch) and lettuce rolled in a brown rice tortilla. Or, make a couple of quesidillas one day and cut them into wedges, and send a few in his lunch during the week.

Gluten free bagel pizza...Kinnikinnik and Glutano have good bagels. I split one, put squeezable pizza sauce on it, Hormel Turkey Pepperoni and a slice of cheese, then toast it in the toaster oven.

gluten-free bagels and cream cheese. You can get the Kraft cream cheese in a foil pack or small container, then he can put it on himself like a Lunchable. Add lunch meat if you want.

Many brands of fruit snacks are gluten-free, Kraft is good at labeling their snacks.

Kraft brand puddings are often gluten-free, again you will be able to tell by reading the label. Those single serving puddings (even off brands are often gluten-free) and Jello snacks are often gluten-free.

Little cans or plastic cups of fruit.

Yogurt...check Yoplait brand. Avoid the Dannon stuff with probiotics, my son and I were glutened wtih them!

Kinnikinnik makes "K toos" cookies which are absolutely identical to OREOS and look very normal. YUMMY!

Small packages of carrots with ranch dressing

Glutano makes a cracker that is similar to a Ritz, you can make peanut butter crackers with these and they look and taste normal.

snack sized Snickers are gluten-free, or the regular sized Reeses peanut butter cups (NOT the mini sized, but the single package with a regular sized cup). Diddo M&M's (not the crispy kind) and everything in a Hershey's chocolate bar grab bag EXCEPT the Krackle (you might want to double check that, as they may have added another non gluten-free bar since I bought them last!).

There's a gluten-free power bar type chocolate granola thing that's really tasty...Zone Bar, I think it's called. There are several flavors, and all of them might not be gluten-free...but check and see. The other advantage to these is if your child needs to gain weight, they are full of protein and add a lot of fiber and calories as a snack.

Kinnikinnik has yummy donuts, in several flavors. They pack about a zillion calories per bite, but taste good!

Amy's brand has a gluten free rice mac and cheese which is microwaveable. There are also some "Nuke-meals" made for kids that are gluten free with things like mac and cheese, chicken nuggets, etc. although I've never tried them. Can't remember the brand name.

Cheetos are gluten-free, so you could put the little snack bags in his lunch. Also, Lay's STAX brand chips are gluten-free (although check each label just in case).

Hopefully this will help...lunch is one of the most difficult things to solve, especially school lunch. We eat very healthy usually at home, but I can see that if/when my kids go to school there might be a need for some more socially acceptable food, and I guess I'll probably allow it since they do eat well most of the time. My kids are currently homeschooled, but I'm sure I'll have to deal with sack lunches eventually! Also, public schools hire a nutritionist to put together their menus. You can check with the school and talk to the person in charge, and they should be able to tell you what is OK in the school's hot lunches. Proceed with caution, though...and expect there to not be many days that he can do hot lunch. It's a somewhat risky option, but if it would help him feel more "normal' to eat hot lunch every now and then it might be worth a phone call!

Best of luck to you, and (((hugs))) to your son. It's miserable when your kid is having problems like that...my son has Celiac's AND has just been dx'd with acid reflux, so feeding him is very challenging and some days I really feel overwhelmed. The gluten free thing does get better, though!

Thanks all great ideas. When I came across this site I struck gold!!! I will be praying for all of you tonight. I wonder is this site MOBILE FRIENDLY??? Have been feed for lunch rice, ground turkey, fresh mixed vegs. corn tortilla w/ an assortment of fillers. He loves vegetables but not the canned vegetables so I sometimes stir fry them. I guess the food he likes confuse the other kids. I will add everyone's ideas to my memory bank and try one at a time. He is going to be so excited to know how many more people cares about him. Thank you form the bottom of my heart. :) In the words of Matt "you rock".

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I'm sorry your son is having to deal with that! That would break my heart, too. The first 6 months or so are really hard, because you are still trying to figure out how to eat. My first few months I ate carrots, chicken, and little else...I thought for sure my son and I would never eat a donut or cookie again! It's been 3 years, and at my son's 11th birthday party last week one of the kids said that the cupcakes I made were the best she'd ever eaten...and nobody knew they were gluten free! It really does get better. Some "cool" lunch options:

tuna fish or lunch meat (check for gluten, Hormel has some good lunch meats w/o gluten or nitrates but it doesn't *look* any healthier than usual), Lighthouse Blu Cheese dressing (or origional Hidden Valley Ranch) and lettuce rolled in a brown rice tortilla. Or, make a couple of quesidillas one day and cut them into wedges, and send a few in his lunch during the week.

Gluten free bagel pizza...Kinnikinnik and Glutano have good bagels. I split one, put squeezable pizza sauce on it, Hormel Turkey Pepperoni and a slice of cheese, then toast it in the toaster oven.

gluten-free bagels and cream cheese. You can get the Kraft cream cheese in a foil pack or small container, then he can put it on himself like a Lunchable. Add lunch meat if you want.

Many brands of fruit snacks are gluten-free, Kraft is good at labeling their snacks.

Kraft brand puddings are often gluten-free, again you will be able to tell by reading the label. Those single serving puddings (even off brands are often gluten-free) and Jello snacks are often gluten-free.

Little cans or plastic cups of fruit.

Yogurt...check Yoplait brand. Avoid the Dannon stuff with probiotics, my son and I were glutened wtih them!

Kinnikinnik makes "K toos" cookies which are absolutely identical to OREOS and look very normal. YUMMY!

Small packages of carrots with ranch dressing

Glutano makes a cracker that is similar to a Ritz, you can make peanut butter crackers with these and they look and taste normal.

snack sized Snickers are gluten-free, or the regular sized Reeses peanut butter cups (NOT the mini sized, but the single package with a regular sized cup). Diddo M&M's (not the crispy kind) and everything in a Hershey's chocolate bar grab bag EXCEPT the Krackle (you might want to double check that, as they may have added another non gluten-free bar since I bought them last!).

There's a gluten-free power bar type chocolate granola thing that's really tasty...Zone Bar, I think it's called. There are several flavors, and all of them might not be gluten-free...but check and see. The other advantage to these is if your child needs to gain weight, they are full of protein and add a lot of fiber and calories as a snack.

Kinnikinnik has yummy donuts, in several flavors. They pack about a zillion calories per bite, but taste good!

Amy's brand has a gluten free rice mac and cheese which is microwaveable. There are also some "Nuke-meals" made for kids that are gluten free with things like mac and cheese, chicken nuggets, etc. although I've never tried them. Can't remember the brand name.

Cheetos are gluten-free, so you could put the little snack bags in his lunch. Also, Lay's STAX brand chips are gluten-free (although check each label just in case).

Hopefully this will help...lunch is one of the most difficult things to solve, especially school lunch. We eat very healthy usually at home, but I can see that if/when my kids go to school there might be a need for some more socially acceptable food, and I guess I'll probably allow it since they do eat well most of the time. My kids are currently homeschooled, but I'm sure I'll have to deal with sack lunches eventually! Also, public schools hire a nutritionist to put together their menus. You can check with the school and talk to the person in charge, and they should be able to tell you what is OK in the school's hot lunches. Proceed with caution, though...and expect there to not be many days that he can do hot lunch. It's a somewhat risky option, but if it would help him feel more "normal' to eat hot lunch every now and then it might be worth a phone call!

Best of luck to you, and (((hugs))) to your son. It's miserable when your kid is having problems like that...my son has Celiac's AND has just been dx'd with acid reflux, so feeding him is very challenging and some days I really feel overwhelmed. The gluten free thing does get better, though!

I hope you got my other message. Wish you and your family the best and hope your son feels better with each day that passes. We are at the beginning of a new adventure :D

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Matt's Mom - invest in a GOOD thermos/food jar. It really opens up the options for lunch at school. My kids love when I send (gluten-free) mac & cheese.

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When my son has friends over, or we have a party, ALL the food is gluten-free. But we don't tell anyone (there's no announcement -- "This food is all gluten free") and early on a friend was eating a brownie, and when my son went to get one of the plate he jumped off the couch and yells "Don't eat that! It's got wheat!"....he had assumed it was not gluten-free, because it was so good.

yesterday I packed extra gluten-free pancakes in my guy's lunch, because his friends always ask for one........

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When my son has friends over, or we have a party, ALL the food is gluten-free. But we don't tell anyone (there's no announcement -- "This food is all gluten free") and early on a friend was eating a brownie, and when my son went to get one of the plate he jumped off the couch and yells "Don't eat that! It's got wheat!"....he had assumed it was not gluten-free, because it was so good.

yesterday I packed extra gluten-free pancakes in my guy's lunch, because his friends always ask for one........

I normally tell the kids it's gluten-free AFTER they have tried it.

I don't want pre-conceived ideas that it will be bad, but when they taste how good it is, I do want them to know it is gluten free. By now most of our friends know that it is because that's all I make, or because they see Garrett eating it.

It's really cute when my 10-year old daughter's friends think the food is so good they ask me for the recipe!

Another thing we have learned is that a lot of kids just don't ever get fresh-baked cookies hot out of the oven. I use timesavers like making up shelf stable mixes or keeping a log of cookie dough in the freezer to make sure my son gets plenty of fresh, homemade foods. It takes a little planning but is well worth it.

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Matts Mom ~ you've gotten lots of great advice here. I will second the previous person who told you to get a good Thermos. My daugther takes leftovers or something hot about three times/week.

I had to :lol: at the person who said they spent $350 at the HFS store their first time there. Our first trip was very high too. It definitely gets easier as you learn what will work. There are only a few store bought things that our dd can have due to the other allergies. But, you should get Tinkyada pasta, Glutino pretzels, and the K-Too cookies, for sure. When we first went gluten-free, there was a mourning period. We cried a lot. Her first few meals were Tostitos, apples, and carrots. :D Now I make nearly everything from scratch and, most of the time, she is okay. She is the healthiest eater I know. Not to say that there aren't sad times, but they are few and far between now. Last week she was VERY UPSET that she ran out of Glutino pretzels. My DH went to get some and they were totally out! THE NERVE! She cried for a while, but they were restocked a couple days later, and she's got them now.

Definitely visit the cooking and baking forum. Lots of great ideas there!!

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If you can find another child with celiac (there's bound to be one in the school or in town) arrangto ie for them to meet. Honestly, this was teh MOST helpful thing- a girl who I have been friends with since I was 11 has celiac, and I never paid much attention it until I was diagnosed just a few months ago. But WOW, has she been helpful- for moral support, recipes, help finding good gluten-free products, delicious baked goods, glutino pretzels at lunch...you name it. The little things count...today in spanish, the teacher was offering everyone cheezits...don't ask why, I have no idea...and we just turned to eachother and laughed about how we have to write to glutino to get them to make a gluten-free version :lol: Even another adult, or just someone who can mentor your family, is your BEST resource. Of course, your online faily is happy to help too ;)

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My daughter is in Kindergarten and I bake all the treats for the class parties. I bake cupcakes and cookies using Tom Sawyer Flour. You can only get it online, at least where I live.

www.glutenfreeflour.com

This flour is AWESOME. It is a one to one ratio and takes the guess work out of baking gluten free treats. Get out any of your "old" cookbooks. If the cookie recipe calls for 2 cups flour, use 2 cups Tom Sawyer flour. The flours are premixed for you and you don't have to mess with guar gum and xantham gum, it's all right in there. Katharine's class LOVES when I bring in treats. They all want seconds and ask to take some home! We also bake banana bread and pumpkin raisin bread with it and those are famliy favorites. The loaves are gone before they even cool! Good luck to you and your son. You are a great mom to recognize the things you have and try to help him! Take care!

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I wonder is this site MOBILE FRIENDLY???

Ahhhhhh . . .. .a question right in my wheelhouse!

I'm typing THIS on a phone, as a matter of fact.

There IS a 'lo-fi version' of this forum (link for it at bottom I believe) but I don't bother w/ that. The regular full-version site comes in great on this Sidekick.

The vast majority of my posts & surfing are on this phone.

I post while in a checkout line & sometimes read while at stoplights. :)

I'd guess that any web-enabled phone or handheld would work here, tho some may have to use the lo-fi version.

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Wow! My nine yr old just found out he can't have gluten. Not sure if he celiac but he can't have any dairy, wheat, gluten, peanuts, and has to rotate beef.

I read in another thread about IEP's and 504 plans for kids with celiacs. (School)

Wish our boys could talk! Mine is doing alright, had the hardest time adjusting to the bread.

GOOD LUCK!!!

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@Alaskaguy With regard to the timing, I think that everyone is a bit different! I used to have a shorter time to onset when I was first diagnosed (within 24h). As time has gone on, and I've glutened myself less and less, I have noticed that the time gets a bit longer.  Recent history seems to matter a bit too - if I've been glutened recently and then get glutened again, the rash will show up faster on the second round. For example, in the last 3 weeks I got slightly glutened by inadvertent
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