Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

Erwin Heuck

2 Yr 8 Month Old Blood Panel Results- Celiac?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Can someone help me interperet the following....I'm wondering if a biopsy and another 3-4 weeks of feeding my son glutin is required.

Lab results for son (2 yrs 8 months):

Anti- tTG IgA 24.4 U/ml, normal <12

Anti- Gliadin IgA 2.6 U/ml normal <10

Anti-Gliadin IgG 64.4 U/ml, normal <10

My son is pale, underweight 26.5 lbs, < 40% height 35", has had low iron (iron stores are good), picky eater and has recently become more irritable/demanding (terrible twos?). He was a good sized baby at nearly 9 lbs and 19.5 inches.

Do I need to continue with glutin in diet for another 3 months for Paed. GI to see hime and potentially do a biopsy that may take 3-4 more additional weeks.

The docs say all his organs are working fine regarding his failure to thrive.

I'd like to help him now, but do not want a false negative on biopsy/endoscopy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. I'd say those results are pretty conclusive. If it were my child,

I'd bypass the EGD.

If there is a valid reason why you need that "all out gold standard confirmation" then by all means... have the biopsy. But, in order for it to be accurate, the doctor is right... gluten will have to stay in the diet for the time being.

With those bt results, I wouldn't bother.

But, that's my opinion... and nothin' but.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, with those results it is pretty obvious the little guy has celiac disease. If he responds well to the diet, you'll have your definite answer. Just make sure you remove all dairy and soy from his diet as well, at least for the first few months.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are pretty positive. But, if you feel the need for a "true" diagnosis, then do the biopsy. If I could have done it all over, I would have waited and stayed on gluten for the biopsy. But, I don't have a 2 year old, sick child. I don't know if I could see him suffer. :( It's really up to you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With those blood results I would also skip the biopsy and start the diet right away. We went through all the testing and my son suffered so much and still had negative results for both bloodwork and biopsies. Yet his response to gluten free was so great that I really don't need prove via biopsy.

I also agree with taking out soy and dairy for a while. My son is doing so much better now and he actually tolerates small amounts of cheese and yogurt now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep in mind that an endoscopy looks for other things beyond Celiac, as well.

A biopsy is a good idea to get a definitive idea of what is going on, as well as to determine the level of damage. Currently, it is the "gold standard" for diagnosis. You'll never have to worry about a doctor questioning if your child has Celiac if they have a biopsy positive for Celiac.

Many Celiacs do just fine eliminating only gluten; some others have sensitivities beyond that.

If you decide to do the biopsy, keep your child on gluten until the biopsy.

http://www.celiacdiseasecenter.columbia.ed...nts/A02-FAQ.htm

http://www.celiacdiseasecenter.columbia.ed...5-Nutrition.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to throw in a little more information to help muddy the decision making process . . .

Will you be able to get some sort of doctor's diagnosis (whether Celiac or Gluten Intolerant) if you don't do the biopsy? This may be something you could get the answer to now. I think some doctors would - based on the blood test and a positive dietary response. I bring this up because even though your child is only 2 1/2, you may be fighting the school system for concessions (microwave/refrigerator/whatever) when the time comes without a doctor's diagnosis. This may not even be an issue for you but just wanted to mention it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Can someone help me interperet the following....I'm wondering if a biopsy and another 3-4 weeks of feeding my son glutin is required.

Lab results for son (2 yrs 8 months):

Anti- tTG IgA 24.4 U/ml, normal <12

Anti- Gliadin IgA 2.6 U/ml normal <10

Anti-Gliadin IgG 64.4 U/ml, normal <10

My son is pale, underweight 26.5 lbs, < 40% height 35", has had low iron (iron stores are good), picky eater and has recently become more irritable/demanding (terrible twos?). He was a good sized baby at nearly 9 lbs and 19.5 inches.

Do I need to continue with glutin in diet for another 3 months for Paed. GI to see hime and potentially do a biopsy that may take 3-4 more additional weeks.

The docs say all his organs are working fine regarding his failure to thrive.

I'd like to help him now, but do not want a false negative on biopsy/endoscopy

With an elevated Ttg at such a young age, this is evidence of intestinal damage. However, the number is still on the low side so damage has probably just started. Your child most definitely has Celiac so the decision to do a biopsy would really be for your peace of mind. The biopsy could still come up negative, though, if damage is very patchy and they don't hit it right.

For myself, I would be hesitant to do one at such a young age but you may be more comfortable with that. A good Celiac doctor would know his bloodwork and symptoms are proof of the disease and back up the diagnosis. You could always start the diet and keep track of response. Then, if things didn't improve within a reasonable amount of time, you could do the scope to see if anything else is going on. That won't affect anything relating to celiac disease because you already know the little guy has it. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
With an elevated Ttg at such a young age, this is evidence of intestinal damage. However, the number is still on the low side so damage has probably just started. Your child most definitely has Celiac so the decision to do a biopsy would really be for your peace of mind. The biopsy could still come up negative, though, if damage is very patchy and they don't hit it right.

For myself, I would be hesitant to do one at such a young age but you may be more comfortable with that. A good Celiac doctor would know his bloodwork and symptoms are proof of the disease and back up the diagnosis. You could always start the diet and keep track of response. Then, if things didn't improve within a reasonable amount of time, you could do the scope to see if anything else is going on. That won't affect anything relating to celiac disease because you already know the little guy has it. Good luck!

Thanks so much to everyone that responded. I feel that the doctors are waffling on calling these symptoms celiac, simply so that they can be 100% confident in their diagnosis. The Dr's confidence will only come with time, observable damage to the villi in his intestine and undue risk to my sons long term health.

I'm fortunate that there is a forum like this to hear what other people think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not a doctor - but here are the things I would be thinking about / asking about.

AGA-IGG is an anti-gluten antibody. Ttg is an anti-self antibody. In little kids with Celiac, sometimes you only get positives on the anti-gluten antibodies, but in your son's case he has already developed an immune response to his own body from intestinal damage. I have read that there are some other conditions like Chron's that can cause an elevated AGA-IGG. In addition, I have also read that there are a very FEW other conditions that can cause elevated TTG. They are serious autoimmune conditions - Type 1 Diabetes, Autoimmune Hepatitis, but Celiac is by far the most common autoimmune condition to cause this to be elevated. The combination of both of them and your child's symptoms would certainly seem to point to Celiac Disease. It would be mathematically unlikely that your child does not have it, is one way to look at it.

You can get the biopsy, and it might have positive or negative results - Celiac damage can be patchy unless your child has total villous atrophy. You can get the scope and biopsy for peace of mind that there isn't something else also going on. And you can read up on Type 1 and/or autoimmmune hepatitis to make sure your child doesn't have symptoms of another autoimmune disorder. Type 1 and Celiac can definitely occur in the same child.

Did they test EMA, by the way - endomysial antibodies? It is not included in some Celiac panels because it is an expensive, hard to read test where you have to prepare a slide and a human has to interpret the results rather than a machine. It also involves the use of monkey esophagus and immunofluorescence. You can get false negatives if the results are not read by a qualified lab like Mayo - but many doctor's offices labs often send the results to Mayo to read. If you get a positive EMA, it's Celiac Disease. There is no other condition that causes this to be positive.

My oldest initially had a panel test that included AGA-IGA, AGA-IGG, Reticulin and EMA at six years old - all were positive. We have since then used Ttg levels to monitor him in the past year - he's been gluten-free for nearly a year with no scope - his GI says he has Celiac (based on the EMA) - there is no need to ever give him gluten again in his life. However, he may get a scope soon because he is not fully well and we need to see what's going on - but he also has soy and peanut allergies and so he may have EE (eosinophilic esophagitis). My middle child - I pulled off gluten at 3 years old without a positive blood test and without a scope/biopsy. I still have some small doubts at times, so we might do a gluten challenge sometime in the future. However, we did have the gene test done and he has the genetics necessay to have Celiac disease. My youngest (of three) also lacked positive blood work, but his symptoms were SO improved that I will never reintroduce gluten. He had bleeding eczema that cleared up completely off gluten.

The TTg result as an anti-self antibody is a serious sign that something is very wrong. If you do not accept that as Celiac Disease, then as a parent I would press very hard to find out exactly what it is.

Best wishes! - April

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Top Posters +

  • Upcoming Events

    • March 24, 2019 Until March 27, 2019
      0  
      NEW ORLEANS GOURMET GLUTEN-FREE mini GETAWAY    March 24 ~ 27, 2019   We have arranged a fun and Gluten-free food filled mini in the city known for it's food and fun.  We have arranged to eat many of the famous dishes that aren't usually Gluten-free at a few of the World Renown restaurants.   Staying at the Royal Sonesta Hotel on Bourbon Street in the center of the French Quarter, you'll be able to enjoy the ambiance of the city at all hours.   Our itinerary will include a Luxury Coach tour of the city and surrounding area - Admission to The National World War II Museum, including the Tom Hanks" 4D film "Beyond All Boundaries" - an exciting Airboat ride and tour through the Bayou.      This it the 3rd time we have visited New Orleans and it has always been well attended, so join us even if you've been there before.  Check out our website for the complete itinerary and cost.    Due to contractual obligations we must have 20 participants by October 31, 2018 to make this a go.      If you have any questions just give us a call at 410-939-3218.  Bob & Ruth info@bobandruths.com (410) 939-3218
    • March 27, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
      0  
       
       
       
      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • March 30, 2019 Until March 31, 2019
      0  
      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
It is not a rash, but hives and swelling.  Some doctors think it is a separate autoimmune disorder or that it piggybacks on to others.  It is more commonly associated with autoimmune thyroiditis.   My last bout lasted for six months.  They appeared (from my head to my soles of my feet) every afternoon around 4:00 pm and resolved by morning.  Oddly, they start with abdominal pain.  That is my first clue and next an itchy head.  I was on a cocktail of antihistamines and attempted a low histam
  • Blog Entries

  • ×
    ×
    • Create New...