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kenlove

Do's And Dont's

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Aloha all!

Thanks again for your help and responding to the menu ideas for the new hotel restaurant here. The chef had me come in today to taste a number of items they came up with that are gluten-free -- I ate way too much but no problems!!! I went into the hotel kitchen early to watch the sous chefs working and just check to see if there may be cross contamination issues. There were none which was good to see especially since one of the chefs was my former student. I can't say the same when we had the tasting and I watched the hotel management pick through the samples, mixing tongs and forks and spoons or using fingers. It's that darn buffet line mentality here. perhaps because we have the lowest unemployment rate in the US, We just cant get enough people to work!

That said, the chef asked me to come up with a list of do's and don't s for the hotel kitchen and wait staff. he also said to thank the forum members here for their thoughts. What you folks have sent me has been passed on to the chefs and acted on. The next step is to get this out to all the restaurants and resorts here so that when you visit, I dont have to cook for the 20,000+ forum members (^_^)

That said, here is the first draft of a dos and donts list. Please remember this is for chefs in Hawaii and some of the words may not be familiar.

What did I forget?

Thanks much

Ken

------------------------

Do's and Don'ts for Preparing and Serving

Gluten Free Meals in Hawaii's Restaurants.

Do's

Make sure menu items that are marked as Gluten Free (gluten-free) are Gluten Free.

(If not, your guest will be sick and in pain an average of 3 days)

Have dedicated gluten-free utensils, tongs and cookware that are ONLY used for gluten-free preparation.

Clean grill or pans thoroughly before cooking a gluten-free protein.

(A dedicated grill, cook top or gluten free area is recommended.)

Make sure any sauce used in a gluten-free meal does not include shoyu, flour or thickener made from vegetable protein. Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein can come from wheat. If cornstarch, potato starch or tapioca starch is used, make sure it is 100% pure and not mixed.

If polenta is served make sure it is 100% polenta. Often polenta and food service corn bread mixes contain wheat or barley.

Soba in Hawaii contains wheat unless it is marked clearly as juwari soba or made from 100% soba or buckwheat. Buckwheat or kasha is not wheat but must be 100% pure.

Consider using quinoa grain.

Do wash thoroughly and/or change gloves before prepping a gluten-free meal.

Make sure there is no cross contamination with utensils, plates or foodstuffs that contain food with gluten.

gluten-free meals should not be plated near baking areas or near breads.

(One tiny crumb can cause a celiac to have major problems)

Keep glasses and beverages away from any bread.

Servers should ask at the table if there are other food allergies the chef needs to be aware of.

Read labels. If in doubt about an ingredient, research or ask the executive chef. Do not include it in gluten-free meal until you are absolutely sure there is no gluten protein derivative.

Don'ts

Don't make a gluten-free salad then put croutons on it.

Servers should carry plates with gluten-free meals separately. Do not carry a gluten-free meal on a tray with other meals. Beverages for celiac patrons should be carried separately, not together with beer or other drinks.

Bread should be kept away from patrons who ordered gluten-free meals.

Do not serve anything with barley malt extract, malt or beer.

Don't use anything in a sauce or reduction that you are not sure of. That includes mixed spices, alcohol with caramel coloring or pre-made mixes, especially food service chicken and beef stock.

Remember

Celiacs cannot eat anything with wheat, Rye, barley or oats.

They can have corn, rice quinoa and potatoes provided there is no cross contamination and that they are 100% pure.

Chemicals in prepared foods can often contain wheat. Make sure what you use is safe.

Shoyu or Soy Sauce is wheat. (Keep wheat free shoyu (like San-J brand) on hand

Soba in Hawaii is either 40% or 60% wheat but a wide selection of gluten free pastas

are available from distributors or at local health food stores. Keep some on hand and you'll make unexpected guests very happy.

Panko is breadcrumbs therefore wheat.

Noodles like pasta and saimin are made from wheat and potentially deadly.

Furikake and nori is not consistently gluten free. Some types are processed with soy sauce and therefore dangerous.

Ponzu, teriyaki and other sauces contain wheat. You can easily create your own with wheat free soy-sauce and fresh island citrus.

---end--

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Hi Ken!

How exciting that you are doing this! Thank you very much.

I would add-- watch out for syrups and sweet sauces, as well as unexpected ingredients (usually malts) in ice creams. And watch the beverages (hot and cold) too for hidden additives (artificial creamers, for example-- and then there is root beer and some lemonaid!) and salad dressings.

Cheese is another biggies-- you really have to watch the blues. Most of them are started with bread mold! You have to call the manufacturer and ask.

Also watch out for dextrins, "spices," "flavoring," (malto)dextrins and starches in foreign products from countries that do not have the same label laws as in the US. Some foreign "gourmet" items may seem safe but are not (and the only way to research them is to try some.) Oyster sauces, fish sauces, etc. are all tricky.

And then there is charcoal-- some commercial charcoal contains gluten. There was a post on a thread about "the sneakiest places you have ever found gluten" and charcoal was in there. So were dry roasted nuts! (That explained a lot to me!)

And the part about the utensils and the bread crumbs/ croutons/ garnishes is really important. I cannot count how many times I have explained that I need "naked" food and they bring me a plate that they have sprinkled parmegian toast crumbs all over! Or there is a broiled tomato on the side topped with crumbs...

Good luck! I hope I can come sample the fruits of your labors...

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Thanks so much for the comments!

Your right I need to mention cheese in a special section -- often blue cheese is dumped on a plate with other edible ones.

Didn't remember about the charcoal, thanks for that too.

Nuts are always a question. My grad student was over a few months ago. (She's form South India) I picked her up at the airport at 630am before we went off to work about 11, she wanted to stop at McDonalds and get something. I figured I would try the yoghurt salad. They have a small package of walnuts with it here. 1.34oz nuts and .25 oz wheat starch.

She ate that along with her lunch. I just couldn't bring myself to eat there even after ordering.

Catering for the SlowFood annual meeting tonight, take care

Hi Ken!

How exciting that you are doing this! Thank you very much.

I would add-- watch out for syrups and sweet sauces, as well as unexpected ingredients (usually malts) in ice creams. And watch the beverages (hot and cold) too for hidden additives (artificial creamers, for example-- and then there is root beer and some lemonaid!) and salad dressings.

Cheese is another biggies-- you really have to watch the blues. Most of them are started with bread mold! You have to call the manufacturer and ask.

Also watch out for dextrins, "spices," "flavoring," (malto)dextrins and starches in foreign products from countries that do not have the same label laws as in the US. Some foreign "gourmet" items may seem safe but are not (and the only way to research them is to try some.) Oyster sauces, fish sauces, etc. are all tricky.

And then there is charcoal-- some commercial charcoal contains gluten. There was a post on a thread about "the sneakiest places you have ever found gluten" and charcoal was in there. So were dry roasted nuts! (That explained a lot to me!)

And the part about the utensils and the bread crumbs/ croutons/ garnishes is really important. I cannot count how many times I have explained that I need "naked" food and they bring me a plate that they have sprinkled parmegian toast crumbs all over! Or there is a broiled tomato on the side topped with crumbs...

Good luck! I hope I can come sample the fruits of your labors...

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Great work Ken. You get the award for Advocate of the Year, here on Celiac.com :D

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Thanks guys

I really see my being diagnosed as a way to increase awareness in Hawaii which in terms helps the restaurants and tourism in Hawaii which in terms helps the farmers become more sustainable -- which is what my job is supposed to be, helping farmers make more money. <G>

The only thing I regret is not being able to judge all the cooking contests I used to Judge -- Guess I'll have to start a gluten-free recipe contest for chefs here!

thanks again

Ken

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Great job, Ken! Hawaiian celiacs are so lucky to have you in their state!

I would add:

NEVER remove croutons from a salad and call it "gluten-free"--it ISN'T, because tiny crumbs from those croutons will remain and cause a serious reaction in a person with celiac. You will have to make a fresh salad with no croutons.

I totally understand what you have written--but your average kitchen staff might not, as there are some things you wrote that really aren't contradictory if you know the terrain, but can be seen as contradictory, especially if not read carefully such as:

"Make sure any sauce used in a gluten-free meal does not include shoyu..."

and

"Shoyu or Soy Sauce is wheat. "

and

"Keep wheat free shoyu (like San-J brand) on hand "

I understand what it all means, but it's not going to be all that clear to someone who doesn't; most people will be confused as to whether shoyu is okay or not.

I think it can be written more clearly and simply:

Nearly every brand of soy sauce or shoyu contains wheat, listed on the ingredients either as wheat or as vegetable protein. HOWEVER, there are a couple of wheat-free brands available. At this time, San-J has a gluten-free version available--it MUST say "wheat-free" on it, as they make several varieties that do contain wheat. Other brands include _____________ (I think Walmart, Target, and Shop'n'Save have wheat-free soy sauces AND teriyaki sauces, but don't know if they are available in Hawaii). Please keep a wheat-free shoyu available at all times.

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Thanks so much, This is a big help.

I screamed at this waiter once for doing the crouton removal thing. Something I never do but I was really hungry had a busy travel schedule and so on and took a bite. He was lucky I didnt throw the salad at him. I had not been that mad since my kids were young --25 years ago.

Your right that it can be confusing and I will rewrite things although I still want to re-enforce the same topics in both dos and donts. Some because the nature of many kitchen staffs who's English ability is limited. Some grasp negatives more than positives and vice versa. In resort kitchens here you can usually hear 4 or 5 languages. Once this gets flushed out it will get printed in a number of them.

In the Italy thread someone posted a list of how restaurants have to be approved in order to be listed in the Italian celiac restaurant Assoc. list. Wish we could put that together here.

Thanks again

Ken

Great job, Ken! Hawaiian celiacs are so lucky to have you in their state!

I would add:

NEVER remove croutons from a salad and call it "gluten-free"--it ISN'T, because tiny crumbs from those croutons will remain and cause a serious reaction in a person with celiac. You will have to make a fresh salad with no croutons.

I totally understand what you have written--but your average kitchen staff might not, as there are some things you wrote that really aren't contradictory if you know the terrain, but can be seen as contradictory, especially if not read carefully such as:

"Make sure any sauce used in a gluten-free meal does not include shoyu..."

and

"Shoyu or Soy Sauce is wheat. "

and

"Keep wheat free shoyu (like San-J brand) on hand "

I understand what it all means, but it's not going to be all that clear to someone who doesn't; most people will be confused as to whether shoyu is okay or not.

I think it can be written more clearly and simply:

Nearly every brand of soy sauce or shoyu contains wheat, listed on the ingredients either as wheat or as vegetable protein. HOWEVER, there are a couple of wheat-free brands available. At this time, San-J has a gluten-free version available--it MUST say "wheat-free" on it, as they make several varieties that do contain wheat. Other brands include _____________ (I think Walmart, Target, and Shop'n'Save have wheat-free soy sauces AND teriyaki sauces, but don't know if they are available in Hawaii). Please keep a wheat-free shoyu available at all times.

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This is great! Many of the non-gluten-free-ingredient-specific guidelines would work for allergy issues as well.

As a diner, I would add:

when bringing any complimentary item to the table, clarify for each restricted diner whether it is 'safe' or not for them (for example, amuse bouche items, chocolates with the bill, etc.)

- my husband often gets to eat mine when this info isn't volunteered (if it's not volunteered, by the time I ask and the server goes to kitchen to check and returns, then next course has often arrived, and I don't want to mess up the restaurant's rhythm)

Tell any restricted diners whether other diners' dishes are 'safe' for them to sample - the whole table doesn't need to be gluten-free, but it's great if you are the gluten-free diner to know what else you can taste!

confirm as you set down the restricted diner's plate that the restriction has been honored - for example, "here is the grilled salmon with quinoa substituted for the pasta"

if more than one server is bringing items to the table, have each server acknowledge the food restriction the first time they visit the table

if the restaurant takes reservations, ideally the food restriction can be noted on the reservation & the server will confirm when arriving at the table (really makes restricted diners feel the restaurant pays attention and 'gets' the situation)

Some of these are more ideals than necessities, but hey any step in the right direction is helpful - great work Ken!

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Thanks much,

these are great suggestions!

The confirmation aspect of the servers role is really important. I usually have to ask 5 or 6 times during a meal if this is the gluten-free something or other. Really a great point!

Some of the high end places in Honolulu and a few here do make a point of making sure the whole meal is gluten-free and will do this. Merrimans, le Mer, Chef Mavro and a few others but not many of us can afford to eat there. Chef Mavro's place is amazing with its set menu's but they will change and alter anything to make it gluten-free when given a days notice.

Thanks again

Ken

This is great! Many of the non-gluten-free-ingredient-specific guidelines would work for allergy issues as well.

As a diner, I would add:

when bringing any complimentary item to the table, clarify for each restricted diner whether it is 'safe' or not for them (for example, amuse bouche items, chocolates with the bill, etc.)

- my husband often gets to eat mine when this info isn't volunteered (if it's not volunteered, by the time I ask and the server goes to kitchen to check and returns, then next course has often arrived, and I don't want to mess up the restaurant's rhythm)

Tell any restricted diners whether other diners' dishes are 'safe' for them to sample - the whole table doesn't need to be gluten-free, but it's great if you are the gluten-free diner to know what else you can taste!

confirm as you set down the restricted diner's plate that the restriction has been honored - for example, "here is the grilled salmon with quinoa substituted for the pasta"

if more than one server is bringing items to the table, have each server acknowledge the food restriction the first time they visit the table

if the restaurant takes reservations, ideally the food restriction can be noted on the reservation & the server will confirm when arriving at the table (really makes restricted diners feel the restaurant pays attention and 'gets' the situation)

Some of these are more ideals than necessities, but hey any step in the right direction is helpful - great work Ken!

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Thanks for the link, looks interesting.

i'm sure there is no way to say gluten free in Hawaii since there was no gluten in the original Hawaiian diet.

Fish, poi, bananas, occasional boar and few other fruits and nuts found here.

I suspect some of the grasses are related to wheat though. They are not eaten but I have a reaction if I'm in the jungle working around them.

take care

Ken - if you haven't already seen this, check out the allergic girl blog and her protocol for dining out with gluten-free & multiple allergies - http://allergicgirl.blogspot.com/2008/01/c...ence.html#links

How do you say "gluten free" in Hawaiian?

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Thanks much!

Got a gluten free meal on on of the airlines a few months back and the flight attendant dumped a bagel on top trying to be nice.

Of course that rendered everything else impossible for me to eat.

Like you said -- it sure makes you wonder----

Ken,

I would also add:

DO NOT ask a gluten-free diner if they would like bread with their meal (unless it's gluten-free bread). This is so disconcerting to me and my husband when eating at a supposedly "guten-free" restaurant. It really makes us wonder if they're going to fix the rest of the meal safely, and it makes the establishment look bad.

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Aloha,

Here is an updated list that includes your comments. Anything else anyone would like me to add?

This will go to hundreds of chefs in Hawaii!

Thanks

ken

Dos and Don'ts for Preparing and Serving

Gluten Free Meals in Hawaii's Restaurants.

Do's

Make sure menu items that are marked as Gluten Free (gluten-free) are Gluten Free.

(If not, your guest will be sick and in pain an average of 3 days)

Have dedicated gluten-free utensils, tongs and cookware that are ONLY used for gluten-free preparation.

Clean grill or pans thoroughly before cooking a gluten-free protein.

(A dedicated grill, cook top or gluten free area is recommended.)

Make sure any sauce used in a gluten-free meal does not include shoyu, flour or thickener made from vegetable protein. Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein can come from wheat. If cornstarch, potato starch or tapioca starch is used, make sure it is 100% pure and not mixed.

If polenta is served make sure it is 100% polenta. Often polenta and food service corn bread mixes contain wheat or barley.

Soba in Hawaii contains wheat unless it is marked clearly as juwari soba or made from 100% soba or buckwheat. Buckwheat or kasha is not wheat but must be 100% pure.

Consider using quinoa grain.

Do wash thoroughly and/or change gloves before prepping a gluten-free meal.

Make sure there is no cross contamination with utensils, plates or foodstuffs that contain food with gluten.

gluten-free meals should not be plated near baking areas or near breads.

(One tiny crumb can cause a celiac to have major problems)

Keep glasses and beverages away from any bread.

Servers should ask at the table if there are other food allergies the chef needs to be aware of.

Read labels. If in doubt about an ingredient, research or ask the executive chef. Do not include it in gluten-free meal until you are absolutely sure there is no gluten protein derivative.

Don'ts

Don't make a gluten-free salad then put croutons on it.

Servers should carry plates with gluten-free meals separately. Do not carry a gluten-free meal on a tray with other meals. Beverages for celiac patrons should be carried separately, not together with beer or other drinks.

Bread should be kept away from patrons who ordered gluten-free meals.

Do not serve anything with barley malt extract, malt or beer.

Don't use anything in a sauce or reduction that you are not sure of. That includes mixed spices, alcohol with caramel coloring or pre-made mixes, especially food service chicken and beef stock.

Remember

Celiacs cannot eat anything with wheat, Rye, barley or oats.

They can have corn, rice quinoa and potatoes provided there is no cross contamination and that they are 100% pure.

Chemicals in prepared foods can often contain wheat. Make sure what you use is safe.

Shoyu or Soy Sauce is wheat. (Keep wheat free shoyu (like San-J brand) on hand

Soba in Hawaii is either 40% or 60% wheat but a wide selection of gluten free pastas are available from distributors or at local health food stores. Keep some on hand and you'll make unexpected guests very happy.

Panko is breadcrumbs therefore wheat.

Noodles like pasta and saimin are made from wheat and potentially deadly.

Furikake and nori is not consistently gluten free. Some types are processed with soy sauce and therefore dangerous.

Ponzu, teriyaki and other sauces contain wheat. You can easily create your own with wheat free soy sauce and Fresh Island citrus.

Notes from Celiac.com Members

Watch out for syrups and sweet sauces, as well as unexpected ingredients (usually malts) in ice creams. And watch the beverages (hot and cold) for hidden additives (artificial creamers, for example-- and then there is root beer and some lemonade!) and salad dressings.

Cheese is another problem-- you really have to watch the blues. Most of them are started with bread mold! You have to call the manufacturer and ask. Don't put blue cheese on the same plate as other cheeses that people with allergens can enjoy.

Also watch out for dextrin's, "spices," "flavoring," (malto) dextrin and starches in foreign products from countries that do not have the same label laws as in the US. Some foreign "gourmet" items may seem safe but are not. Oyster sauces, fish sauces, etc. are all tricky and often dangerous for celiacs and others.

Some commercial charcoal contains gluten, which can affect what's being cooked or processed. Dry roasted nuts can often be affected this way.

NEVER remove croutons from a salad and call it "gluten-free"--it ISN'T, because tiny crumbs from those croutons will remain and cause a serious reaction in a person with celiac. You will have to make a fresh salad with no croutons.

"Make sure any sauce used in a gluten-free meal does not include shoyu..."

"Shoyu or Soy Sauce is mostly wheat. "

"Keep wheat free shoyu (like San-J brand) on hand "

--------

As a diner, I would add:

When bringing any complimentary item to the table, clarify for each restricted diner whether it is 'safe' or not for them (for example, amuse bouche items, chocolates with the bill, etc.)

Tell any restricted diners whether other diners' dishes are 'safe' for them to sample - the whole table doesn't need to be gluten-free, but it's great if you are the gluten-free diner to know what else you can taste!

Confirm as you set down the restricted diner's plate that the restriction has been honored - for example, "here is the grilled salmon with quinoa substituted for the pasta".

If more than one server is bringing items to the table, have each server acknowledge the food restriction the first time they visit the table

If the restaurant takes reservations, ideally the food restriction can be noted on the reservation & the server will confirm when arriving at the table (really makes restricted diners feel the restaurant pays attention and 'gets' the situation)

---------------

DO NOT ask a gluten-free diner if they would like bread with their meal (unless it's gluten-free bread). This is so disconcerting to me and my husband when eating at a supposedly "gluten-free" restaurant. It really makes us wonder if they're going to fix the rest of the meal safely, and it makes the establishment look bad.

-end-

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:) Looks great Ken!

Don't know if you want to add, 'for more information, visit www.glutenfreerestaurants.org '

If the restaurant is really going to take gluten-free seriously, they might as well get the positive publicity! Of course having suggested this, I realize that I have no idea if GFRAP has representatives in Hawaii - if not perhaps you can be the first :D

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Thanks much,

I think the tourist industry here needs to help develop these types of guidelines. Were small enough that in some areas it mightbe possible. A gluten free hawaii may not be around the corner but its worth working on!

There is noting listed in Hawaii now at glutenfreerestaurants but there should be. We need to develop our own lists by island too.

thanks again

:) Looks great Ken!

Don't know if you want to add, 'for more information, visit www.glutenfreerestaurants.org '

If the restaurant is really going to take gluten-free seriously, they might as well get the positive publicity! Of course having suggested this, I realize that I have no idea if GFRAP has representatives in Hawaii - if not perhaps you can be the first :D

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    Oh yes, it could, although to be honest I never got myself so wet with sweat that it would have been a serious situation.  However, I can remember one time when I got caught in a cloudburst while going to my car in a large parking lot, though, and got soaked to the skin, and of course had to wear those soaking-wet clothes while I drove the 45 minutes it took me to get home --- I will NEVER forgot the misery and agony of that drive!  I could just barely keep the car under control, in fact.
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Water?! That's… unreasonably inconvenient. Did it happen with sweat?
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