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ptkds

Grain Mill?

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I know this has been discussed before, but maybe someone new out there has some experience.

I am considering buying a grain mill like a Wondermill or a Nutramill. But I am hesitant because I really like using fine flours from the Asian stores. I am worried that these mills will not grind the rice to a fine enough texture. But I have to go out of town to buy Asian flours, and the risk of CC always worries me.

So, does anyone have one of these mills, and how well does it work? I want to know how fine it really gets the rice flour. I don't like grainy rice flour at all. I used to have a KitchenAid Grain mill to go on my KA mixer, but it wasn't fine enough so I sold it on Ebay.

Anyone know about these machines?? Or do you know of another one that is good??

Thanks!


ptkds

Mom of 4 beautiful girls (the 2 youngest are only 10 months apart!)
Diagnosed with Celiac disease on November 8, 2006; gluten-free as of 12-1-06.

DD#2 13 years old; diagnosed on November 28, 2006. gluten-free as of 12-7-06.
DD#3 9 years old; diagnosed through blood work in October 2006. Gluten-free as of mid-November and doing GREAT!!
DD#4 8 years old; had a scope done on 6-22-07 (at 14 months old) and the dr saw stomach ulcers, but all test results were negative. GI dr told us to put her on the gluten free diet anyway. She is gluten free as of 6-22-07.

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I looked into grain mills, but the grains I like turn out to be more expensive than the flours unless I buy a ton of them.

I stopped using rice flours once I tried buckwheat, millet, sorghum, bean flours, etc. None of these are grainy at all to me. In fact I hadn't noticed how grainy the rice flours were until I tried them again after using the others for a while.

Here's a place to get all sorts of gluten-free flours: http://www.barryfarm.com/flours.htm

I know this isn't exactly what you were looking for, but maybe it will help.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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Sorry I didn't see your post before!

I'm trying to make the same decision, myself. I milled my own wheat for years before my dx last fall, but rice is a whole other ballgame. I did mill some rice in my mill (Whispermill - basically the same as the Wondermill) before I gave it away, just to see what the texture was like, but I'm still not sure what to say about it. I haven't gotten any Authentic Foods flour, yet, so I couldn't compare it to that. And I couldn't bake w/it because it would have been thoroughly contaminated by all the wheat flour in the mill. Looked pretty good to me, but it's so hard to say.

I did "talk" with a dealer whose kids have celiac, and was disappointed to hear that she does sometimes sift her home-milled rice flour. That didn't sound good. I don't remember seeing and "hard bits," as she put it, in the flour I milled, but I may have just missed them.

She did say that she thought the Nutrimill would give a marginally finer flour than the Wondermill, in any case. And I also think you can get a coarser grind w/the Nutrimill if you want it, which I know from my years w/ the Whispermill is quite impossible with that one. I did side-by-side comparisons of flour milled at the finest and then at the coarsest setting, and couldn't detect any difference.

So if I can get hooked up with a natural foods buying club again, I will probably get a Nutrimill. Buying grains in bulk works well for me, and in that case the price is a fraction of the cost of store-bough gluten-free flours. I do find that I prefer millet and sorghum to rice flour in many things, so the rice will be less of an issue for me.

Wish I had more definitive answers for you, but hope this helps a little.

Beth

p.s. I had the KA mill, too, but agree that the flour was too coarse, and you couldn't do much at a time w/o burning out the mixer motor. Also, are you able to get brown rice flour at the Asian stores? I'm still getting up to speed with all this.

I am considering buying a grain mill like a Wondermill or a Nutramill. But I am hesitant because I really like using fine flours from the Asian stores. I am worried that these mills will not grind the rice to a fine enough texture. But I have to go out of town to buy Asian flours, and the risk of CC always worries me.

So, does anyone have one of these mills, and how well does it work? I want to know how fine it really gets the rice flour. I don't like grainy rice flour at all. I used to have a KitchenAid Grain mill to go on my KA mixer, but it wasn't fine enough so I sold it on Ebay.

Anyone know about these machines?? Or do you know of another one that is good??

Thanks!

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I have a Nutramill...had it for most of a year....so far I just use it for brown rice flour...I like it...perhaps it does not grind as fine as the flours you buy, but the baked foods are just fine to me....it takes quite a while to grind a 2# bag of rice...over 1/2 hour...but then I try to set it on the fine grind, so that may explain the length of time...I have not had any experience with other mills, but the Nutramill works for me......I got the mill from Pleasanthill grains, Aurora, Ne....the first mill I got was leaving a black soot on the top of the flour bin, so they exchanged it for me...no questions....this one seems to be doing just fine...

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Have you talked to Bosch or the dealer about this? I forwarded your comment to a dealer I know, and she does not think it should take anywhere near that long. Your mill should be under warranty, so I would recommend giving the company a call.

....it takes quite a while to grind a 2# bag of rice...over 1/2 hour...but then I try to set it on the fine grind, so that may explain the length of time...I

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MNBeth....I took the first mill back to the dealer...as I don't live too far from Aurora....took a bag of rice along...they ground it there....they was a bit surprised when it took that long...but didn't say that something was wrong with it.....the flour is pretty fine....maybe that's why it takes that long....??

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MNBeth....I took the first mill back to the dealer...as I don't live too far from Aurora....took a bag of rice along...they ground it there....they was a bit surprised when it took that long...but didn't say that something was wrong with it.....the flour is pretty fine....maybe that's why it takes that long....??

I guess it could be. But the dealer I talked to does do brown rice regularly, and has been working with these mills for years. I know with my mill - which was not a Nutrimill, but similar - it wouldn't have taken anything like that amount of time. I think it would be worth calling the manufacturer - not the dealer - and seeing what they have to say. For what you pay for a mill, you want one that works like it's supposed to.

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Hi,

I am considering purchasing a mill too. Where doe you buy your sorghum in bulk? Have you had any wheat field cross contamination?

Blessings,

Lori

Sorry I didn't see your post before!

I'm trying to make the same decision, myself. I milled my own wheat for years before my dx last fall, but rice is a whole other ballgame. I did mill some rice in my mill (Whispermill - basically the same as the Wondermill) before I gave it away, just to see what the texture was like, but I'm still not sure what to say about it. I haven't gotten any Authentic Foods flour, yet, so I couldn't compare it to that. And I couldn't bake w/it because it would have been thoroughly contaminated by all the wheat flour in the mill. Looked pretty good to me, but it's so hard to say.

I did "talk" with a dealer whose kids have celiac, and was disappointed to hear that she does sometimes sift her home-milled rice flour. That didn't sound good. I don't remember seeing and "hard bits," as she put it, in the flour I milled, but I may have just missed them.

She did say that she thought the Nutrimill would give a marginally finer flour than the Wondermill, in any case. And I also think you can get a coarser grind w/the Nutrimill if you want it, which I know from my years w/ the Whispermill is quite impossible with that one. I did side-by-side comparisons of flour milled at the finest and then at the coarsest setting, and couldn't detect any difference.

So if I can get hooked up with a natural foods buying club again, I will probably get a Nutrimill. Buying grains in bulk works well for me, and in that case the price is a fraction of the cost of store-bough gluten-free flours. I do find that I prefer millet and sorghum to rice flour in many things, so the rice will be less of an issue for me.

Wish I had more definitive answers for you, but hope this helps a little.

Beth

p.s. I had the KA mill, too, but agree that the flour was too coarse, and you couldn't do much at a time w/o burning out the mixer motor. Also, are you able to get brown rice flour at the Asian stores? I'm still getting up to speed with all this.

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My Vita-Mix has a dry container and special blades for grains. It works very well. I always sift the flour though to make sure there arent some larger bits I missed. I also enjoy that it is a multi-purpose machine.

If I could only have one appliance, it would be my Vita-Mix. I love it!

I just wish they werent so expensive. I bought a new one when I went gluten-free because my old containers and blades were contaminated. And the containers are so expensive, that it must made sense to me to buy a new machine which came with 2 new containers. I now have a back up engine if anything every goes wrong with the new one. However, the old one is over 12 years old and still works great!


GLUTEN FREE 4/4/08. LEGUME/SOY FREE 5/15/08. YEAST FREE. CORN FREE. GRAIN FREE. DAIRY FREE. I am eating all meats, eggs, veggies, fruits, squash, nuts and seeds. I just keep getting better every day. :)

Do not let any of the advice given here substitute for good medical care. Let this forum be a catalyst for research. Find support for any post in here before you believe it to be true. Arm yourself with knowledge. Let your doctor be your assistant. Listen to their advice, but follow your own instincts as well. Miracles are within your reach. You can heal!

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I am currently looking for a grain (and bean and nut) grinder to make my gluten-free flours. I'm hoping people are out there that can give me advice on finding a model that can handle all of the above, and doesn't cost an arm and a leg. Please comment on any missinformation below (for example can the nutrimill or wondermill handle oily grains?) as well as reccomend anything that works for you.

After reading many reviews online (... written by people producing wheat flour) it appears that the best models for fine flour, for non-oily grains, are the Nutrimill and the Wondermill (same as whispermill just new company owns the design). The best comprehensive review I saw was posted here - http://www.everythingkitchens.com/article-...r-grinders.html . The websites for both of these say for non-oily grains so I assume no nuts or beans can be ground here.

There are manual mills as well as mixer attachment mills available but it appears that most of these are considerably slower and grind only corser flours not suitable for bread or cake flours.

The Retsel Mill-rite grain mill also seems to have a (small) following. And it has additional grinding stones for purchase to make grinding of oily grains (beans and nuts) possible. But this model is significantly more expensive, as is the additional attachment. At this point I plan to watch ebay for this model.

Also this seems like an option- CountryMill . And then I could motorize it myself. But for this price should maybe just buy Retsel's mill?

I am recently on the gluten free lifestyle (my first post on this forum) but love to make.. and eat.. and share... food from scratch. Hope someone out there can help.

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I use the K-Tec Kitchen Mill. It grinds all kinds of grain really fine. I wouldn't trade it for the world. I just keep the grain on hand and grind up whatever amount I need so it doesn't go rancid.

I am currently looking for a grain (and bean and nut) grinder to make my gluten-free flours. I'm hoping people are out there that can give me advice on finding a model that can handle all of the above, and doesn't cost an arm and a leg. Please comment on any missinformation below (for example can the nutrimill or wondermill handle oily grains?) as well as reccomend anything that works for you.

After reading many reviews online (... written by people producing wheat flour) it appears that the best models for fine flour, for non-oily grains, are the Nutrimill and the Wondermill (same as whispermill just new company owns the design). The best comprehensive review I saw was posted here - http://www.everythingkitchens.com/article-...r-grinders.html . The websites for both of these say for non-oily grains so I assume no nuts or beans can be ground here.

There are manual mills as well as mixer attachment mills available but it appears that most of these are considerably slower and grind only corser flours not suitable for bread or cake flours.

The Retsel Mill-rite grain mill also seems to have a (small) following. And it has additional grinding stones for purchase to make grinding of oily grains (beans and nuts) possible. But this model is significantly more expensive, as is the additional attachment. At this point I plan to watch ebay for this model.

Also this seems like an option- CountryMill . And then I could motorize it myself. But for this price should maybe just buy Retsel's mill?

I am recently on the gluten free lifestyle (my first post on this forum) but love to make.. and eat.. and share... food from scratch. Hope someone out there can help.

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I decided to get a hand cranked country living grain mill. I'm going to order it today. I'll post if I like it. I get sorghum grain at Twin Valley Mills. They say that they spend 2 days cleaning their combine before using it on the sorghum, and then use the first quite a lot for the general population before selling it to the gluten free crowd. I haven't had problems with wheat contamination from them, and I have from lots of other places.

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