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mommyofceliacboys

Substitution Confusion!

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I'm trying to adapt some recipes to be gluten-free, but I'm stuck on one recipe that calls for 1 cup wheat flour, and 1 cup all-purpose flour. I have a store bought mix that I can substitute straight across for all-purpose, but I'm not sure what to do with the wheat.

Any suggestions?

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I'm trying to adapt some recipes to be gluten-free, but I'm stuck on one recipe that calls for 1 cup wheat flour, and 1 cup all-purpose flour. I have a store bought mix that I can substitute straight across for all-purpose, but I'm not sure what to do with the wheat.

Any suggestions?

What's your recipe for? I would think you could just use two cups of your gluten-free flour blend. I'm assuming the 1 cup wheat flour was for whole wheat flour and that the original recipe was just trying to get a little fiber and not so much processed flour into the mix. Before baking gluten-free, I use to use half whole wheat and half all-purpose (which is still wheat flour, just processed more) in a lot of my recipes just to make it a little "healthier" - which is kind of amusing in hindsight.


Janet

Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted.

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What is the recipe for, and could you post it or a link to it?

And secondly, what is in the "store bought all purpose" mix ? Does it have xanthan gum already in it ? What kind of gluten-free flours are in it?

Otherwise we're all just stumbling around in the dark here. If you are baking something, you need to have certain things in the gluten free baking recipes to create certain results. The various pre- mixes have slightly different ingredients. The doughs also may be wetter or stickier than a "normal" dough. That's why so many people describe what the dough should look like when it's mixed up. Then there's that allergy/other intolerance thing, where the person goes, oh yeah, I forgot to mention I don't want any dairy or soy or eggs in this....

It's the gluten free yeast bread recipes which tend to be the most dramatic in the difference of what you intended vs. what you ended up with. :o

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What's your recipe for? I would think you could just use two cups of your gluten-free flour blend. I'm assuming the 1 cup wheat flour was for whole wheat flour and that the original recipe was just trying to get a little fiber and not so much processed flour into the mix. Before baking gluten-free, I use to use half whole wheat and half all-purpose (which is still wheat flour, just processed more) in a lot of my recipes just to make it a little "healthier" - which is kind of amusing in hindsight.

It's for muffins. I do think it is only the make them "healthier". So I'll just substite the wheat flour with the other stuff and cross my fingers!!

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What is the recipe for, and could you post it or a link to it?

And secondly, what is in the "store bought all purpose" mix ? Does it have xanthan gum already in it ? What kind of gluten-free flours are in it?

Otherwise we're all just stumbling around in the dark here. If you are baking something, you need to have certain things in the gluten free baking recipes to create certain results. The various pre- mixes have slightly different ingredients. The doughs also may be wetter or stickier than a "normal" dough. That's why so many people describe what the dough should look like when it's mixed up. Then there's that allergy/other intolerance thing, where the person goes, oh yeah, I forgot to mention I don't want any dairy or soy or eggs in this....

It's the gluten free yeast bread recipes which tend to be the most dramatic in the difference of what you intended vs. what you ended up with. :o

The recipe is for some muffins. I'm actually experimenting around with the Deceptively Delicious recipes by Jessica Seinfeld. Since my kids are picky and won't eat their veggies, I'm trying to add them in their meals in different ways.

Yes, the all-purpose flour I got from the gluten-free pantry does have xanthan gum already, but I haven't used it yet, so I'm not sure how well it works. Also, the recipe in question does have eggs, and dairy.

Thanks for your help!

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I've noticed that the gluten free recipes also tend to use a little more baking soda and baking powder than the gluten recipes. When I convert one of my old recipes, I add the extra xanthan gum and also increase baking powder/soda. I will look at a similar recipe (from a gluten-free cookbook or online) and see how much xanthan/baking powder/baking soda gets added and then do something similar . . . so far it's worked OK.


Janet

Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted.

animal0028.gif

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I've noticed that the gluten free recipes also tend to use a little more baking soda and baking powder than the gluten recipes.

Yeah, I've noticed that as well.

Since my kids are picky and won't eat their veggies, I'm trying to add them in their meals in different ways.

Not to go off-topic, but one way to get veggies to interest kids might be pies, like carrot pie, sweet potato pie, etc. Pumpkin is a type of winter squash, but maybe you should keep that to yourself ;) Using Stevia instead of sugar can essentially make a pie into a nutritious treat without the guilt.

Anyway, muffins can work with a variety of gluten-free flours, so I doubt you'll have much trouble replacing the whole wheat flour part. For color (and a wonderful texture IMO) try buckwheat flour. T'eff flour is very high in fiber and protein, and works well with chocolate flavors.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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I've noticed that the gluten free recipes also tend to use a little more baking soda and baking powder than the gluten recipes. When I convert one of my old recipes, I add the extra xanthan gum and also increase baking powder/soda. I will look at a similar recipe (from a gluten-free cookbook or online) and see how much xanthan/baking powder/baking soda gets added and then do something similar . . . so far it's worked OK.

I will try that for sure!!

Thanks!

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Yeah, I've noticed that as well.

Not to go off-topic, but one way to get veggies to interest kids might be pies, like carrot pie, sweet potato pie, etc. Pumpkin is a type of winter squash, but maybe you should keep that to yourself ;) Using Stevia instead of sugar can essentially make a pie into a nutritious treat without the guilt.

Anyway, muffins can work with a variety of gluten-free flours, so I doubt you'll have much trouble replacing the whole wheat flour part. For color (and a wonderful texture IMO) try buckwheat flour. T'eff flour is very high in fiber and protein, and works well with chocolate flavors.

I haven't thought about buckwheat, but I'll try it.

Thanks for the tips. B)

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