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stolly

Buying Flour And Baking Ingredients...where To Start?

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We're new to this and wondering what are the best multipurpose flours and binders (gums?) to buy when just starting the gluten free diet? What about baking soda and baking powder...are they gluten free? If not, where can we find gluten free versions?

Thank you!


Holly

DD5: juveline rheumatoid arthritis 8/07; celiac 3/08

DS3: negative blood tests

Me and DH: negative blood tests

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If baking soda or powder had anything in it, it would say wheat on the label. So check the label. I use Arm and Hammer baking soda and Rumford baking powder. You may not want to use your old soda and powder because it is most likely contaminated from previous non-gluten-free baking. For the most part, stick with flours that say gluten-free on the label. It's hard for me to say which flours you should get because each recipe calls for different ones. But, a white rice flour, tapioca starch or flour and potato or cornstarch(two of the three starches) and a gum are the basics and should get you started. You can buy flour blends to start with and then buy and mix your own as you become accustomed to gluten-free baking. Gluten Free Pantry is one that is the basic rice/starch mix) Just take note that some packaged blends contain gum and others don't so you may need to purchase the gum separately. You can find the rice flour and starches at an asian market for much less than they go for at other stores. I use Bob's Redmill All-Purpose gluten-free flour for gravy and cream sauces but it contains bean flour which many don't find palatable in most baked goods. I also use it in bread.


Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11

Son: ADHD '06,

neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07

ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08

ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08

Gluten-free-Feb. '09

other food allergies

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I'm a huge Pamela's fan. It makes the BEST pancakes and waffles I've EVER had!! I use it for all of my baked goods except pie crust. It already has baking powder, soda, salt and xanthan gum, so my baking prep is cut in half. I use it straight across for flour and omit any powder, soda, salt in the recipe (most all the recipes I use are still from my good old Better Homes and Gardens cookbook!). You do HAVE to cut the amount of fat by 1/2 to 2/3 because the mix has almond flour in it which is also a fat and your cookies will run and your muffins will be too moist-yeah there is such a thing ;) . My chocolate chip cookie recipe calls for 1 cup (16TBS) butter and I use 6TBS butter--plus there's LOTS of calories saved. If not for all the baked goods, definately use it for the pancakes. (You can buy it in bulk from amazon if you like it.)


Rachelle 20dance.gif

Daughter diagnosed 1/06 bloodwork and biopsy
-gluten-free since 1/06

Son tested negative-bloodwork (8/07), intestinal issues prompted biospy (3/08), results negative, but very positive dietary response, Dr. diagnosed Celiac disease (3/8)

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Clabber Girl baking powder is gluten free.....

For flours, if you are new to this, I would suggest a prepared mix (expensive) to get you started. Sources for these products are Whole Foods, Wild Oats, natural food stores,some supermarkets carry Bob's Red Mill products,Asian markets (inexpensive), ordering on-line. When you become more familiar with gluten free cooking, then you can stock up on the flours that you prefer. I'm just beginning to have successful cooking experiences....from scratch. I've also had some dismal failures. I keep a diary of every recipe I have tried, and rate it on a scale of 1-6.

I now have a collection of various flours....rice,tapioca,potato starch, cornstarch, millett, flax, montina, buckwheat, almond, coconut, teff. When I try a new recipe, I usually have all the ingredients I need on hand. I did not purchase all of these ingredients at once, I purchased them a few at a time because of the cost. I have other food issues besides wheat, so have been ordering stuff on line...often with free shipping from Amazon, and have ordered directly from Bob's Red Mill. Very quick service.

I also have purchased quite a few cookbooks...some new, some used, and this forum is the best for recipes and help with cooking.

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We're new to this and wondering what are the best multipurpose flours and binders (gums?) to buy when just starting the gluten free diet? What about baking soda and baking powder...are they gluten free? If not, where can we find gluten free versions?

Thank you!

Welcome to gluten-free baking!

I use Featherweight baking powder, it's labeled gluten-free :)

I haven't mastered baking from scratch yet, I usually rely on prepared mixes (brands like Pamela's, Namaste, gluten-free Pantry).

I do keep some brown rice flour and white rice flour on hand to use in a pinch.

As far as gums I think the one I see listed over and over again in gluten-free recipes is xantham gum.

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I agree with celiac-mommy. I started out using Pamela's baking/pancake mix before I ventured into mixing my own flours. It's very easy and very helpful when you are so new and everything is SO overwhelming (especially baking). But, if you're ready to go into mixing your own flours, I use the basic rice flour combo of 6 cups brown or white rice flour mixed with 2 cups potato starch and 1 cup tapioca starch. This works well in most recipes and use about 1 tsp xanthan gum per 1 - 1 1/2 cups flour.

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I do like Pamelas, but I've also had luck with Bob's Red Mill mixtures and Gluten Free Pantry as well. If you read the ingredients on the back of the label it says what mixture is in there and I've had good luck with all of them. The pancake mixes and things like that already have the xantham gum in them...I have never used anything but xantham gum and I've never had a problem with it. Just try different things and find what you like.


Step son (the youngest boy in picture) diagnosed with Celiac December of 2006, family eats gluten free most of the time, but not always.

I believe my husband also has Celiac, but is too stubborn to be tested.

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