Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

DianeByrd

How Long Do I Continue This Diet?

Recommended Posts

It's been awhile since I've posted. We've been trudging along on a gluten, milk, and soy free diet for a couple years now. I've honestly lost track of time. It's been a tough road at times - the high cost of food, the time involved in cooking from scratch, always packing food when we go somewhere, wondering if my family is getting enough of the right nutrients (fat, fiber, vitamins, etc.), juggling between cooking and shopping for my two dd's who need all the calories they can get with my husband's need to shed pounds, not getting to participate as easily in social settings, the doctors' disapproval, double checking what my dh buys and feeds them, and food just not being quite as tasty. I dread having to go back for a well-child check up to learn the possibility that one or both of my dd's have not moved up on the growth chart sufficiently. I felt so certain toward the beginning of this diet choice with much improvements in growth and a decrease in number of stools for the older one and some improvement in growth and a relief of constipation and high alkaline phosphatase levels for the younger.

I'm thinking of doing a diet challenge, but should I do milk, soy, or gluten first? I was wondering if anyone could tell me if they've heard of someone not having diarrhea on a challenge? Is it possible that this is a natural reaction to being off of a food and would it happen to anyone regardless of their sensitivity to the food? Also, if I were to do the challenge, should I tell them? I'm concerned it would just confuse them, but I don't want to be dishonest either. They are 4 1/2 and almost 3.

Is there any other way to know for certain? I'm so tired of continuing something that I have a nagging doubt about.

If I do continue to maintain a gluten-free cf sf home, any suggestions on how to make simple, quick, well-balanced meals that are kid friendly, high in calories for them, easy enough to make lower in fat for my dh, and that won't break the bank?

I'd really appreciate input.


Diane

dd: failure-to-thrive beginning at 12 months, thriving since gluten-free diet 1/06

Enterolab tested

dd: failure-to-thrive and chronic constipation beginning at 15 months, resolved after gluten, milk, and soy free

Enterolab tested

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


It sounds like you are very stressed out and tired. And interestingly enough, I told my dh today that I was completely re-vamping how I shop from here on out for some of the reasons you just mentioned (travel, high cost, etc.). From now on, I am ordering specialty foods on-line in bulk. More often than not, it is less expensive, the shipping rates are low, it doesn't cost me a fortune in fuel to get to the health food store AND it won't suck up 3-6 hours of my week in "shopping"! ;) Between work and family responsibilities, I really could use that extra time doing something more productive and fun. And this year, I want my dd to have some extracuricular activities...i.e..a "social life".

If you do a challenge, you need to be aware of a few things. The first is, if your dds have been completely dairy-free, they most likely no longer produce lactase (the enzyme that breaks down lactose) and therefore, they can get crampy and very gassy even with small amounts. Diarrhea may also be a foregone conclusion. I suppose that when you get to this phase, you could have them take a papain/bromelain enzyme with the offending food (or even Lactaid) to help them physically digest it. And I would imagine that you'd have to start off with very small amounts and work your way up. Honestly, I would think that dairy would be the hardest to determine if the reaction was due to intolerance or simple enzyme deficiency. I can't imagine this one could be determined quickly. Most likely, it will take a few months. Hopefully, someone else will have some definitive things to look for.

I think that I would probably trial soy first, dairy second and gluten last. And I don't envy you that particular trial because to do it "right", it would involve a trial that would last for several months. It could potentially take weeks to months to trial each food to determine whether or not the food was still a problem. And personally, I don't believe that any of these foods are good for human health in the short or long term. But I do understand that everyone needs to come to these conclusions in their own way.

I also don't know how you'd approach this trial with your children. I wouldn't want to lie and try sneaking these foods in. And you'll need their input to help determine where they physically are at with all of it. Hopefully someone else will have a suggestion.

As for simple, inexpensive meals that are healthy and can accomodate the various needs of the family, I think you'd be surprised at what's out there. My family's new favorite is a baked dijon/maple syrup chicken with chives. It's 1/4 cup of dijon mustard, 1/4 cup maple syrup + 1/8 cup agave, 1/2 tsp salt, 1/8 tsp pepper and about 1-2 TBSP of chives. Just mix together sauce ingredients in a pan and stir until combined. Pour the mix over raw chicken breasts in a casserole and bake in the oven at 375 until chicken is done (about 20-30 minutes depending on thickness of chicken). It pairs well with sweet potato fries (also baked) and green beans. Plus, there is usually plenty of extra sauce the kids would enjoy for dipping. It's low in fat, tasty and so very easy to make. And most of the ingredients are easily found in your local grocery store at reasonable prices.

I really would recommend gravitating towards foods that are naturally free of gluten/dairy/soy as opposed to buying a majority of specialty foods. Not only would it save you money, but it would also save you time and offer a higher nutritional value as well.

Good luck with this decision. I hope you find a way to settle this doubt soon.


Vicky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I'm not a parent st stay away from tho take my advice for what it is worth in your situation. I'd simplify if I were you. I'd stop trying to eat like I did before by substituting this for that. It never really works, IMHO. I'd just revamp everything and start eating whole foods, nothing processed. I personally eat meat and veggies, eggs, coconut milk, nuts, nut butters and a little fruit. It's easy to prepare (I cook in bulk) and I think saves a lot of money and time. I found out SE Asians pretty much eat that way (except rice) so I like to use a lot of Thai recipes and ideas in my cooking.

I can understand that the kids might reject eating like this at first but eventually they will probably adapt. In my family when I grew up, you ate what Mom served or went hungry. Sometimes Mom would get on some strange kicks with health foods so we were exposed to all kinds of tastes. I think it was a good thing, I like almost all food.

I know I have adapted to this "simple" diet. I find the diet highly delicious and as varied as my imagination and cooking skills allow. Oh yes, it should help your husband's weight problem too. He should avoid starchy veggies and he should eat less fruit too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I think if you want to do a challenge, you should just do it on yourself and not tell them (they're under 5 years old, you don't have to tell them everything and that is not lying). I'd probably advise against challenging them at all. MAYBE with soy and dairy, but defintitley not gluten. From what I understand, the casein only takes two weeks to clear out of your system, but gluten can take months and you could be setting them up for big reversal in their progress.

just my two cents! good luck with your decisions! Sorry I don't have input on jazzing up the diet, i'm in the same boat of struggling to know what to cook, just getting used to it for past 3 months.

Liz

It's been awhile since I've posted. We've been trudging along on a gluten, milk, and soy free diet for a couple years now. I've honestly lost track of time. It's been a tough road at times - the high cost of food, the time involved in cooking from scratch, always packing food when we go somewhere, wondering if my family is getting enough of the right nutrients (fat, fiber, vitamins, etc.), juggling between cooking and shopping for my two dd's who need all the calories they can get with my husband's need to shed pounds, not getting to participate as easily in social settings, the doctors' disapproval, double checking what my dh buys and feeds them, and food just not being quite as tasty. I dread having to go back for a well-child check up to learn the possibility that one or both of my dd's have not moved up on the growth chart sufficiently. I felt so certain toward the beginning of this diet choice with much improvements in growth and a decrease in number of stools for the older one and some improvement in growth and a relief of constipation and high alkaline phosphatase levels for the younger.

I'm thinking of doing a diet challenge, but should I do milk, soy, or gluten first? I was wondering if anyone could tell me if they've heard of someone not having diarrhea on a challenge? Is it possible that this is a natural reaction to being off of a food and would it happen to anyone regardless of their sensitivity to the food? Also, if I were to do the challenge, should I tell them? I'm concerned it would just confuse them, but I don't want to be dishonest either. They are 4 1/2 and almost 3.

Is there any other way to know for certain? I'm so tired of continuing something that I have a nagging doubt about.

If I do continue to maintain a gluten-free cf sf home, any suggestions on how to make simple, quick, well-balanced meals that are kid friendly, high in calories for them, easy enough to make lower in fat for my dh, and that won't break the bank?

I'd really appreciate input.


Liz

Positive enterolab results 11/07:

-antigliadin IgA: 56 (normal <10)

-antitissue tTG IgA: 39 (normal <10)

-anti-casein IgA: 34 (normal <10)

-HLA-DQ: 2,1 (2,6)

Positive blood test IgA and IgG 12/07

Gluten-free Casein-free since 12/07

mostly soy free since 12/07

Diagnosed with adrenal fatigue 08/07

Diagnosed hypothyroid 01/08

Still have mercury fillings, high mercury and lead

Multiple chemical sensitivities

9 year old daughter positive enterolab test for gluten, casein, soy and egg with HLA-DQ 3,1 (7,6)--mostly exhibits behavioral reactions to foods including food dyes, MSG, aspartame

Mother passed away 3 years ago of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary. Two years prior had diarrhea causing her to weigh 86 pounds...Mayo clinic told her to take pepto bismol. NO test for celiac, lifelong hx of ulcers, osteoporosis. I now know she had the celiac gene (my dad has DQ1) and was probably undiagnosed her whole life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter



Join eNewsletter