Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

MELINE

Gluten In Cheese?

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone....I have no idea..is there any non safe cheese????? I had a really tiny amount (I am intollerant in lactose) and within 1 our nausea started. But I have noticed that I only have nausea with gluten. So is there any cheese that has gluten????


Celiac September 2007

Graves disease June 2008

Candida overgrowth / started treatment November 2008

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


So is there any cheese that has gluten????

Yes, I think it is bleu cheese. I could be a little off on the bleu because we don't do either gluten or casein but I do remember one of the "fancier" cheeses with gluten.


Shellfish free since 1980

Milk free (all forms) since 1991

Feingold in 2003

First gluten-free round 2007

Now entering full time Gluten free, egg free, almond/peanut free

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Blue Cheese is NOT a no-no. :rolleyes:

Many if not most blue cheeses are "started" with a synthetic bases. If, in the US, wheat is used as a "started" in blue cheese, it by law is required to be listed.

Cheeses in their natural form are gluten free. When cheese is processed, it may be subject to added gluten.

Meline, in Greece I do not know your labeling laws.


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

HI from Tokyo

natural cheese is usualy no problem if there is no mold.

feta, and the cheese in saganaki ( I forget name, maybe keffateri?)

and other greek cheese should be no trouble.

If lactose is problem then cheese can be problem. Many Japanese are lactose intollerant and cheese is not so popular here and also very expensive!

I went to 3 markets to find feta to make horiatiki last night but could not find anyplace.

no kalamata olives or salonica pepper too.

I miss Greek foods! <G>

take care

Hello everyone....I have no idea..is there any non safe cheese????? I had a really tiny amount (I am intollerant in lactose) and within 1 our nausea started. But I have notices that I only have nausea with gluten. So is there any cheese that has gluten????

"Ryo tatereba mi ga tatanu"

If we try to serve both sides, we cannot stand our own ground.

Japanese proverb

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Since you have only been gluten free for a short period of time, chances are, your body hasn't healed yet. If the cheese was safe....

You may be:

1. temporarily lactose intolerant

2. "reacting" to safe foods, because your villi haven't healed and you can't properly digest/absorb. Damage wasn't done overnight, and doesn't go away overnight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Blue Cheese is NOT a no-no. :rolleyes:

Many if not most blue cheeses are "started" with a synthetic bases. If, in the US, wheat is used as a "started" in blue cheese, it by law is required to be listed.

Cheeses in their natural form are gluten free. When cheese is processed, it may be subject to added gluten.

Meline, in Greece I do not know your labeling laws.

http://surefoodsliving.com/2007/12/06/is-b...se-gluten-free/

There has been thousands of pages of discussion on this site regarding blue cheese and its gluten free status. Please do a search here and then choose to eat it or not.


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

m,

Sorry you are having a problem with it. You didn't specify what kind of cheese it was. I eat sharp cheddar cheese every single day with no problems. Nor was I lactose intolerant after starting the gluten-free diet.

Unless the brand of blue cheese lists wheat, I think it's safe and eat it also.

best regards, lm


gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Occasionally wheat flour will be added to grated cheese to make it not stick together. I've never found a grated cheese in the store that did this (and it would have to be labeled), but I did encounter this once at a mexican restaurant.


Gluten-Free since September 15, 2005.

Peanut-Free since July 2006.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

HI from Tokyo

natural cheese is usualy no problem if there is no mold.

feta, and the cheese in saganaki ( I forget name, maybe keffateri?)

and other greek cheese should be no trouble.

If lactose is problem then cheese can be problem. Many Japanese are lactose intollerant and cheese is not so popular here and also very expensive!

I went to 3 markets to find feta to make horiatiki last night but could not find anyplace.

no kalamata olives or salonica pepper too.

I miss Greek foods! <G>

take care

Hi ken!!

The cheese in saganaki is called keffalotyri (you were close enough!) You can't find feta and kalamata olives and saloinica pepper!! That's a good reason for you to leave immediately from Japan and visit te Greek Islands!! I hope that someday you are going to do this trip! But be sure that you have many packages of gluten-free bread and pasta cause here you will not find any....But at least you will be eating souvlaki for breakfast....

Have fun in sushi land!!


Celiac September 2007

Graves disease June 2008

Candida overgrowth / started treatment November 2008

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Blue Cheese is NOT a no-no. :rolleyes:

Many if not most blue cheeses are "started" with a synthetic bases. If, in the US, wheat is used as a "started" in blue cheese, it by law is required to be listed.

Cheeses in their natural form are gluten free. When cheese is processed, it may be subject to added gluten.

Meline, in Greece I do not know your labeling laws.

I hate blue cheese so at least for now it's not a priority for me to see if it is gluten-free (of course the more I know the better it is so I'll check it out). I think I don't understand the word processed....You want to say for example a cheese that is with less fat had to go through a procedure? that is the meaning of processed???? Cause the cheese I ate was low fat.Is that the case??

In greece my dear momma goose no one is paying attention in gluten...Imagine that the rate is 1 in 11.000 people with celiac...But I'll give it a try and call them and find out my self...I just wanted to know if there is any chance that there is gluten. You say that there is, so I'll make that call..Thanx


Celiac September 2007

Graves disease June 2008

Candida overgrowth / started treatment November 2008

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Since you have only been gluten free for a short period of time, chances are, your body hasn't healed yet. If the cheese was safe....

You may be:

1. temporarily lactose intolerant

2. "reacting" to safe foods, because your villi haven't healed and you can't properly digest/absorb. Damage wasn't done overnight, and doesn't go away overnight.

Really? Happy girl I had no idea that my body could react even in safe foods....To tell you the truth I had an accident (again...) 2 days before so maybe that's the reason for nausea?? Thank you for the information


Celiac September 2007

Graves disease June 2008

Candida overgrowth / started treatment November 2008

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

m,

Sorry you are having a problem with it. You didn't specify what kind of cheese it was. I eat sharp cheddar cheese every single day with no problems. Nor was I lactose intolerant after starting the gluten-free diet.

Unless the brand of blue cheese lists wheat, I think it's safe and eat it also.

best regards, lm

Yes you are right.....The cheese I had is called "milner" (that is the trade mark...I don't know if it is sold in your country....). It's a white low fat cheese.

Question! When you say you were not lactose intolerant after gluten-free diet you mean you were before but then it stopped???????? It's kind of a symptom? That's what you mean? There is a chance that I am going to stop beeing lactose intolerant???I understand that each case is different, I just want to hear your case and maybe I can check it out and see if it works for me....Cheddar cheese tastes GREAT but I am allergical in all yellow cheeses.Thank you so much for the information.


Celiac September 2007

Graves disease June 2008

Candida overgrowth / started treatment November 2008

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Meline,

"Celiac disease is an autoimmune digestive disease that damages the villi of the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food"

Your body is still damaged from gluten.

"When people with celiac disease eat foods containing gluten, their immune system responds by damaging the fingerlike villi of the small intestine. When the villi become damaged, the body is unable to absorb nutrients into the bloodstream, which can lead to malnourishment."

Because your body is still damaged, it can't respond properly...hence, why you still may be having symptoms until you are fully healed, and your nutrient levels increase.

(Quotes come from: http://www.celiaccentral.org/What_is_Celiac_/13/)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

.....Question! When you say you were not lactose intolerant after gluten-free diet you mean you were before but then it stopped???????? It's kind of a symptom? That's what you mean? There is a chance that I am going to stop beeing lactose intolerant???I understand that each case is different, I just want to hear your case and maybe I can check it out and see if it works for me....Cheddar cheese tastes GREAT but I am allergical in all yellow cheeses.Thank you so much for the information.

I do not think I was lactose intolerant at any time, before or after gluten-free. Of course I suspected that maybe I was lactose intolerant because my stomach was so messed up after I would eat. But, that turned out to be Celiac disease.

Many people believe that when you have damaged villi due to Celiac, then you may (or may not, as in my case) experience other intolerances - until your villi heal, usually a matter of months. These may include lactose intolerance, intolerance to greasy foods, and other lessor sensitivities I can't remember right off. However, I'm under the impression that it's usually more of a milk and ice cream problem, and not cheese so much.

Too bad about the yellow cheeses. I've never heard of that. Is'nt it an amazingly varied group of sicko's we've got here on the forum (as related to food intolerances and allergies). :D

best regards, lm


gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

When we say "processesed," we mean any of the steps a food goes through to get to market. This includes the making of the food and the packaging of the food. In making the food, a small amount of a gluten ingredient could be added to change the flavor or texture of the food. In packaging the food, a small amount of a gluten ingredient could be used to keep the food from sticking to the equipment. Also, some companies use the same equipment to make foods with gluten and foods without gluten. How well does this equipment get cleaned? Sometimes, not well enough.

So even if the cheese should not have gluten, there is a chance that it actually does. I have gotten sick from foods that should have been safe. I'm sure that I am not the only one.

Good luck.

-D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Question! When you say you were not lactose intolerant after gluten-free diet you mean you were before but then it stopped???????? It's kind of a symptom? That's what you mean? There is a chance that I am going to stop beeing lactose intolerant???

The same villi that are damaged by celiac are responsible for producing the enzyme that allows us to digest milk sugar, lactose. For many it is essential to heal completely that they drop dairy out for a while. There are some of us who are intolerant to the protein in dairy, casien, for those of us the intolerance is most likely permanent. Those who are lactose intolerant only are often able to add dairy back in after they heal.

The best way to introduce it back in is hard cheeses, like cheddar, and also yogurt. These should be what you start with. They are often tolerated well even when 'wet' cheeses like mozzarella still upset. Many also tolerate goat cheeses more than cow, those should be readily available.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Hi Meline

Greece is one of the few places I have not been too so dont be surprised if we do show up -- with plenty of gluten-free foods. souvlaki is great any time of the day!

What are some of the other cheeses you want to eat?

Maybe cheese is not the hard part but giving up lukomathes may be <G>

I can barely spell in english much less greek~!

take care

Hi ken!!

The cheese in saganaki is called keffalotyri (you were close enough!) You can't find feta and kalamata olives and saloinica pepper!! That's a good reason for you to leave immediately from Japan and visit te Greek Islands!! I hope that someday you are going to do this trip! But be sure that you have many packages of gluten-free bread and pasta cause here you will not find any....But at least you will be eating souvlaki for breakfast....

Have fun in sushi land!!


"Ryo tatereba mi ga tatanu"

If we try to serve both sides, we cannot stand our own ground.

Japanese proverb

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Meline,

"Celiac disease is an autoimmune digestive disease that damages the villi of the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food"

Your body is still damaged from gluten.

"When people with celiac disease eat foods containing gluten, their immune system responds by damaging the fingerlike villi of the small intestine. When the villi become damaged, the body is unable to absorb nutrients into the bloodstream, which can lead to malnourishment."

Because your body is still damaged, it can't respond properly...hence, why you still may be having symptoms until you are fully healed, and your nutrient levels increase.

(Quotes come from: http://www.celiaccentral.org/What_is_Celiac_/13/)

Thank you happy girl. One last question? What does the word "villy" means?? I couldn't find it in the google thranslation page....


Celiac September 2007

Graves disease June 2008

Candida overgrowth / started treatment November 2008

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Too bad about the yellow cheeses. I've never heard of that. Is'nt it an amazingly varied group of sicko's we've got here on the forum (as related to food intolerances and allergies). :D

best regards, lm

Yes......he he he!!!! wierd!!!! Too many messed up stomacks....Me I have 40 food intolerances and 6 food allergies! But guess what....I really do not care!!!!! Just want to be healthy. Thank you for your time!


Celiac September 2007

Graves disease June 2008

Candida overgrowth / started treatment November 2008

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Hi Meline

Greece is one of the few places I have not been too so dont be surprised if we do show up -- with plenty of gluten-free foods. souvlaki is great any time of the day!

What are some of the other cheeses you want to eat?

Maybe cheese is not the hard part but giving up lukomathes may be <G>

I can barely spell in english much less greek~!

take care

Ken I am going to kill you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I had completely forgotten loukoumathes (come on it's not such a difficult word!!) I really miss feta cheese and I am going to have some right now (trying to forget loukoumathes....hehehehehe!!!)

Have fun!!!


Celiac September 2007

Graves disease June 2008

Candida overgrowth / started treatment November 2008

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Villi = <a href="http://www.celiac.org/celiac disease-what.php" target="external ugc nofollow">http://www.celiac.org/celiac disease-what.php</a>

Another good site with info: www.celiacdiseasecenter.columbia.edu

Can't open any of them happy girl.....There is a message saying "sorry can't display the page you are looking for"....

Any way, I found in wikipaidia that villi is something in our intestine so I think I know what the greek word is..


Celiac September 2007

Graves disease June 2008

Candida overgrowth / started treatment November 2008

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

The info from the first link was:

"When individuals with celiac disease ingest gluten, the villi, tiny hair-like projections in the small intestine that absorb nutrients from food, are damaged. This is due to an immunological reaction to gluten. Damaged villi do not effectively absorb basic nutrients -- proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals, and, in some cases, water and bile salts. If celiac disease is left untreated, damage to the small bowel can be chronic and life threatening, causing an increased risk of associated disorders -- both nutritional and immune related."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter



Join eNewsletter