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Emily Elizabeth

Outback Bread - Gluten Free!

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Being a celiac who loves bread, I think there is nothing worse than going to restaurant and not being able to eat the bread that they bring out at the beginning. After going to Outback the other day I became determined to satisfy my craving for their bread. This is what I came up with! (I also copied my favorite dish - Toowoomba Pasta - if anyone is interested).

http://www.recipezaar.com/290760

Outback Steakhouse Copy Cat Bread (Gluten Free)

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I haven't tried this yet, although I will, but I would guess that replacing the garbanzo flour with teff flour would give you the color you're looking for, and might be better for people like me who easily detect the presence of bean flour. I think I'll try it that way, and then also replace the cornstarch with arrowroot starch, or potato. Just a personal preference in flavor. This looks so good, I'm so excited. I much prefer recipes that call for honey as a sweetener instead of sugar. And please, lay the pasta recipe on me!


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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I forgot about that bread...that stuff was good!

I miss hearty brown bread...I'll have to try this :D


Gluten Free since 10/07

Mildly Lactose Intolerant, slight intestinal symptoms after eating milk products, but easily corrected with lactase enzyme

Endometriosis- DX'd 5/07

Gluten Antibodies- "negative"...don't know exact numbers, am highly suspicious...

DXed celiac 12-19-07 via genetics/elimination diet- DQ2 allele

Brother with Celiac, aspergers...his tests were all negative (he didn't have genetics done), including endoscopy, but he definitely is at the least gluten intolerant...highly suspect my mother has it as well- she has hyperthyroid, fibromyalgia, hemochromatosis, and now colon cancer, and she has been weak and exhausted and just generally sick. She's going to get tested.

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I haven't eaten the Outback bread in so long I can't remember what it tastes like, but I've smelled it. :rolleyes:

If you want a darker colored bread you can try adding some agave nectar in place of the honey, and maybe a small dollop of molasses. I found this out by accident, that if I used any agave in a white bread mixture it comes out baked a deep golden color even tho the dough doesn't look any darker.

I was puzzled by the short bake time listed until I went to recipezar and saw the photo of the finished bread, and then thought about the amount of flour used vs. the size of the bread pans that must have been used to get that shape. It looks like the full size 9x5 pans were used to make 2 short height loaves that would be more likely to bake thru. (and this could be a good idea.)

I think if somebody uses smaller loaf pans the baking time is going to change (be longer) because I've never gotten a 3x7 mini loaf bread pan filled to make a full sized mini loaf shape to bake that quickly, it's more like 40 minutes+ for the center to cook thru and not be gooey.

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If you want a darker colored bread you can try adding some agave nectar in place of the honey, and maybe a small dollop of molasses.

Thanks for the tip! I'll have to try that. Thanks also for mentioning the cooking time adjustment for the different pan sizes. I wouldn't have thought of that. Happy baking!

Emily

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Thanks for the tip! I'll have to try that. Thanks also for mentioning the cooking time adjustment for the different pan sizes. I wouldn't have thought of that. Happy baking!

Emily

I have never had luck with any gluten-free bread rising to full height in regular bread pans. The bread is always low in height and not a good size for sandwich making. I began using metal coffee cans to back all my gluten-free bread in. gluten-free dough seems to rise much better when fully contained in cans. I use 2 small metal coffee cans for typical bread recipe and lay baked bread on its side to slice. The top and bottom slice can be used as hamburger bun. With each recipe I get 16 round slices and 2 hamburger buns. I also use large metal coffee cans sometimes with gluten-free french bread recipe and fill 2 cans and slice from top of loaf instead of laying on side as I do with small can loaves. The french bread recipe also seems to rise better and by slicing from the top a more typical and larger bread slice is what I come up with. Does anyone else have a different bread pan method that they find works well with these unusual gluten-free bread recipes?


Self dx celiac disease

Gluten free since July 2007

Clinical dx celiac disease November 2007

Self-dx Lyme disease May 2008

Lyme confirmed positive Western Blot May 2008

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I have never had luck with any gluten-free bread rising to full height in regular bread pans. The bread is always low in height and not a good size for sandwich making. I began using metal coffee cans to back all my gluten-free bread in. gluten-free dough seems to rise much better when fully contained in cans. I use 2 small metal coffee cans for typical bread recipe and lay baked bread on its side to slice. The top and bottom slice can be used as hamburger bun. With each recipe I get 16 round slices and 2 hamburger buns. I also use large metal coffee cans sometimes with gluten-free french bread recipe and fill 2 cans and slice from top of loaf instead of laying on side as I do with small can loaves. The french bread recipe also seems to rise better and by slicing from the top a more typical and larger bread slice is what I come up with. Does anyone else have a different bread pan method that they find works well with these unusual gluten-free bread recipes?

Wow! That's such an interesting idea. What are coffee cans made out of, anyway? Tin? Iron? Aluminum?


If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill

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I think aluminum. I take off plastic top and remove paper label then wash and grease and dust with gluten-free flour before filling. gluten-free french bread I brush with egg wash before baking and with all bread I brush crust with melted butter before removing from pan. I got the idea for coffee cans because I used to use them for baking sweet bread like banana bread in my pre-gluten-free days as the round slices looked nice.


Self dx celiac disease

Gluten free since July 2007

Clinical dx celiac disease November 2007

Self-dx Lyme disease May 2008

Lyme confirmed positive Western Blot May 2008

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