Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

SpikeMoore

Glue Bricks (i Mean Bread)

Recommended Posts

Just venting.

I tried to make bread one time in the oven. A brick of glue resulted. So I thought I'd be smart and use a bread machine with premixed bread mix. Another brick of glue. Oh, but I had another bread mix...make it 3 bricks of glue, expensive glue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Just venting.

I tried to make bread one time in the oven. A brick of glue resulted. So I thought I'd be smart and use a bread machine with premixed bread mix. Another brick of glue. Oh, but I had another bread mix...make it 3 bricks of glue, expensive glue.


Brenda Diagnosed Celiac 2005 Woodville, Massachusetts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Just venting.

I tried to make bread one time in the oven. A brick of glue resulted. So I thought I'd be smart and use a bread machine with premixed bread mix. Another brick of glue. Oh, but I had another bread mix...make it 3 bricks of glue, expensive glue.

I think that the key is to remember that

gluten-free bread is nothing like wheat breadl I use corn starch , potato flour and rice flour the key is xanthum gum. The consistancy is a lot wetter than bread dough. It only has to rise once . I used to make everything really dry and crumbly. The Gluten Free Kitchen cookbook was my best discovery. I like to add rice flour to give things a little more texture. (I made cinnamon rolls...mmm.) It is definitely a learning experience, but once you find your way it tastes pretty good. My son even loves the corn bread. Good Luck. Brenda


Brenda Diagnosed Celiac 2005 Woodville, Massachusetts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Don't give up yet.... :) I just used Pamela's bread mix, altered the sweet bread recipie to use honey in place of the sugar (reduce liquid by 2 T), steeped saffron in the milk and added another egg yolk....Baruch atah adonai, eloheinu melech ha'olam, hamotzi lechem min ha'aretz-I'd swear it was Challah....I can't tell you how it is after a while out of the oven, because we ate it all :lol:


I don't eat gluten and neither do my cats

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

The very first gluten-free bread I made was a scratch recipe, and I used potato flour instead of potato starch. I baked that thing for over 2 hours and it never did get done! :lol: It took a couple months before I finally figured out what I did wrong and was ready to start experimenting again. I mostly stick with making buns now, the loaves usually fall. :huh:

myst


"When you run out of red, use blue!" ~ Pablo Picasso

Self-diagnosed gluten intolerant

gluten-free since May '05

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Just venting.

I tried to make bread one time in the oven. A brick of glue resulted. So I thought I'd be smart and use a bread machine with premixed bread mix. Another brick of glue. Oh, but I had another bread mix...make it 3 bricks of glue, expensive glue.

Hi SpikeMoore,

The glue bricks, the bricks of clay (that be mine haha). I've made rice bread from premade mixes twice now. The first time I made it I goofed and added 2 tablespoons of yeast, instead of the 2 tsp's called for. Oddly enough, it turned out better (although on the dry side) the first time I made it, with the extra yeast. The second time I made it I added what they said, and it was worse lol :D

In one book I have it suggests that since gluten free bread dough, lacks the elasticity that the gluten provides, you need extra leavening (aka yeast) to help improve on its texture so on. Book name is "The Gluten Free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide" by Shelley Case (dietician)

Good book, recipes, a total dietician break down of all foods we can as gluten-free have and not have. Also, brand name labels to look for; that do gluten free products.

I think there's a definate science to this gluten free bread making... >>> Time to bring out the kiddos chemistry kit and get experimenting.. haha

Keep trying, both you and I will eventually find a scratch recipe that works for each of our own's individual taste standards.

hugs


44 yr old mom, SAHM (stay at home; aka a Retro Mama :D , 2 special needs kids dd 15yrs ds 4 yrs

Follows Compassion Rules "Treat others; they way you wish to be treated"

blood test negative: celiac However, doctor felt other factors in blood works warranted trying the gluten-free diet

April 7/08 Doctor confirms gluten intolerance/ remain gluten-free for 2 more months; and repeat tests

Gluten free since March 4/2008 (other than accidently, or unknown gluten used--- its a learning process, Gluten is everywhere!)

"People are like stained-glassed windows. Best viewed in the light!" unknown author

"I am only as strong as the coffee I drink, and the hairspray I use" :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Perhaps it's not really fair for me to put my 2 cent's worth in here, since I don't even eat bread anymore. But I guess my question is: why are you trying to make bread? If it is to make sandwiches, aren't there easier (and tastier, not to mention less fattening) ways to eat what is basically a filling? Romaine lettuce comes to mind for wrapping tuna or chicken salad in... yum!

I have made a quite decent pizza dough by using alternative flours (who cares what it tastes like, it's drowning in spicy pizza sauce, anyway!) I have made a really good cornbread to have with soup and stew, and a darn good scone for my tea.

I use brown rice tortillas (Trader Joe's) for quesadillas (instead of grilled cheese), and puffed rice cakes for spreading stuff like peanut butter.

There are so many options out there for the things you are accustomed to using bread for, and I am not sure I even want to try baking something that is not really going to taste like "real" (glutenized) bread because I think I would just be disappointed. I spent too many years eating the real thing to be satisfied with an imitation.

(Like I said, it's probably not fair for me to ask the question in the first place - especially when you consider how much energy and time I have spent trying to come up with an alternative to scones and muffins, but those products don't rely on gluten for their texture as bread does.)


gluten-free since 2/10/08

EnteroLab results 4/18/08:

Antigliadin IgA 228 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 191 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Anti-casein IgA antibody 127 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Guess I'm going CF now, too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

My first attempt at gluten-free bread was a foccaccia which was pretty nice. But then i tried the multi=grain miracle bread which people rave about all over the web (including on this site) and it fell and tasted bitter. Then I reacted to yeast on an allergy test and gave up. I do think part of my problem was that i let the breads rise too long - like the miracle bread said rise to the top of the pan, but it never made it that far and it rose for hours.

I never much liked bread anyways - i felt spoiled when I could get away with making my sandwhiches on rice cakes instead of bread. i do miss a good multi-grain sourdough, tho.


Cara - 42, mom to dd 15, ds 12, ds 4

Off gluten and dairy (and tapioca ;-( ) since 11/07

A.L.C.A.T. test showed over 50 sensitive foods

Celiac panel came back negative.

Regular allergy testing reacted to every inhalant and all but 6 foods.

Slowly adding in foods, started w 19 and now have 25

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Just venting.

I tried to make bread one time in the oven. A brick of glue resulted. So I thought I'd be smart and use a bread machine with premixed bread mix. Another brick of glue. Oh, but I had another bread mix...make it 3 bricks of glue, expensive glue.

Are you expecting the dough to look like a regular bread dough? Gluten free bread dough looks more like a quick bread dough, very wet and not something you can knead.

This isn't the most attractive bread but has nice flavour, just don't cut it until it is completely cooled.

TAPIOCA BREAD

1 3/4 cups warm water

2/3 cup instant milk powder

3 large eggs, beaten

1/4 cup melted butter

1 tsp vinegar

1/4 cup sugar

1 1/2 tsp salt

2 1/4 cups brown rice flour

1 1/2 cups tapioca flour (sometimes sold as tapioca starch)

1 Tbsp Xanthan gum (this is important to help the structure of the loaf)

1 Tbsp quick rise yeast

In a bowl (I use my KA but this can be done in a bread machine) whisk together water, powdered milk, eggs, melted butter and vinegar until well blended. Pour into baking pan if using bread machine or just leave in KA bowl. Combine sugar, salt, rice flour, tapioca flour, xanthan gum and yeast. Add to baking pan or KA Bowl. If using bread machine, insert into machine. Close lid. Used rapid rise cycle or shortest cycle; start machine. Once machine begins, with a ruber spatula stir and scrape down sides of pan, without touching the kneading blade, until dry ingredients are well mixed. If using KA, run machine on low with the paddle attachment, scraping sides occasionally until the dough is well mixed. Pour into a greased bread pan (I couldn't find a size on the one I use but 8 cups of water filled it to the top - a pan smaller than this will overflow) and let rise for 45 min to 1 hour. Place in a 375 F oven and bake for about 45 minutes (I always check earlier than that and using an instant read thermometer it should read 200 degrees). Remove bread from pan when done and cool completely before slicing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I have three littles so I have to come with as many calorie rich weight producing meals as possible to keep weight on them. Putting weight back them may just be out of reach but we are trying.

I follow GLuten Free 101 recipes and the bread recipe on here everyone raves about. Having been a heavy baker, I thought this would be a walk in the park. NOT!

But here are the tips I have learned so far

The bread is unlike anything you have ever cooked. It requires no kneading (just mixing it is enough) You don't let it over rise, you don't get to "shape" it (how I will ever make breaded french bread again ..) and you POUR it into the pan. It's like a thick chunky cake mix or very thin bread dough.

Bake it covered with a foil tent over it and then take it off the last 10 or so minutes. THEn let it cook until you can thump it like a melon. YEP! not until it is brown but until you are scared stiff that you have burnt it and it thumps like a melon. THat keeps it from falling other than slightly. It doesn't have the spring to touch like gluten breads. Falls to much reduce the liquid. Too dry went too far.

So far other than some fallen bread tops , i have managed to produce bread that is edible and has a taste and texture similiar to gluten bread. Until you forget the memory of wheat, it will disappoint you but once you lose that taste, it is actually pretty good. My gluten husband will eat the bread and buns and not complain beyond it does taste different than wheat but isn't a bad taste. THe kids are wolfing it up and begging for more. I have made bread (from here) cinnamon rolls (from here but substituted gluten free 101 cookbook flour mix) hamburger buns, brownies, pizza from Gluten free 101. All have come out decent the first time and much better the second time, and some of it is now auto pilot. I think you just have to get the right recipe for your conditions as humidity and weather does play a part in bread making and can cause problems (like here I use double the baking soda/powder because it gives better rise) and then you just get better as you cook that recipe. I did start with the prepackaged mixes to get a view of what they were suppossed to do before I started from scratch stuff.

HTH

Stacie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I have had pretty good luck with quick breads. These use no yeast and are normally pretty sweet. These recipes are usually used for things like banana and zuchinni breads. But after a lot of trial and error - I found the right combination.

One suggestion is to double the amount of eggs required.


Failure is not an option

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I do the Cheba Foccaccia bread now. That's the only bread I bother with. Glutenfreemall sells the Cheba. I bake it per directions and ten minutes before it's done I drown it in mashed broiled garlic and butter and it makes a very passable garlic bread. I don't bother with loaves of anything anymore. There will never be a gluten-free bread that tastes like wheat bread so I don't bother. The nice thing about Foccaccia is that I never ate it prior to being diagnosed, so I have no preconcieved notions about how it should taste or what it's texture should be.


"My mother always told me, it's okay to play with a man's mind

as long as you put it back where you got it when you're done with it."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I don't know if it is our altitude, our (lack of) humidity or something else but I have found my breads come out better if I preheat my oven to a higher temp then suggested then drop it down after I put the bread in.


Shellfish free since 1980

Milk free (all forms) since 1991

Feingold in 2003

First gluten-free round 2007

Now entering full time Gluten free, egg free, almond/peanut free

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

If you want to make a loaf of bread that looks "braided", you can order the pan off of Amazon that you pour batter or soft dough into that will shape this.

"Braided Loaf Pan"

http://www.Lame Advertisement/Kaiser-Bakeware-Form...2885&sr=8-2

Lol, at the preview link, go to Amazon's kitchen, bread pan category and do a search if it doesn't come up or put Amazon in place of Lame advertisement in the url. The brand of pan is Kaiser.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I have to give it up to all of you who BRAVELY attempt to make bread...

YOU

GUYS

RULE!!! :lol::lol::lol:


Collette

Positive Bloodwork Oct 1st 2007. Gluten-free 3 YEARS Oct 1st!

Dairy & Soy free since Dec 1st 2007.

Potato free since January 3rd 2008.

Remaining Nightshades since April 1st 2008. Back on September 2010. :)

Developed Rice & Tapioca & Corn Intolerances...

NO Carageenan.

In a constant state of evolution... sending love! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I made one loaf of very good bread and the rest are very doughy inside. I am thinking it is this way becasue it isn't rising enough. I am having more difficulty getting the recipie right because I am using flax instead of eggs.

It's worth it to keep on trying. most store bought gluten-free bread is very small and very dry.

This is what I am using, I changed the flours, we don't use bean. Got the link from another thread.

http://www.recipezaar.com/190906

the pamela's mix was very good even though it didn't turn out perfectly. If you're going to try a mix try that one!


Whole family is allergic to Gluten, eggs, dairy, most are allergic to garlic. Few other various allergies.

Did you know it's best to wait until 21 months to give a baby wheat??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I made one loaf of very good bread and the rest are very doughy inside. I am thinking it is this way becasue it isn't rising enough. I am having more difficulty getting the recipie right because I am using flax instead of eggs.

It's worth it to keep on trying. most store bought gluten-free bread is very small and very dry.

This is what I am using, I changed the flours, we don't use bean. Got the link from another thread.

http://www.recipezaar.com/190906

the pamela's mix was very good even though it didn't turn out perfectly. If you're going to try a mix try that one!

It may have been doughy inside because it needed to bake longer. Breads can vary in baking time just like other baked goods. A good rule of thumb is to use a wooden pick to check for doneness, if it comes out with gooey dough sticking to it then it's not ready to come out. If the loaf is browning too much but is not done yet just tent it with some tinfoil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Before I attempted making a loaf, I experimented with small amounts of dough, so as to not waste ingredients. I found muffins, biscuits, cookies, etc to be easier to get right. I don't use high starch ingredients, so I suppose the things I make turn out different than what most on this board seem to be doing. I never did like "white bread", so that probably makes a difference too.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I agree with the poster that said that you have to kind of wait awhile to forget what bread tastes like. I made quite a few bricks, cried buckets of tears, and wasted a lot of money. What worked for me was to quit trying to make bread for awhile. I started making the banana muffins from www.savorypalate.com Those worked and tasted good to even the gluten eaters in our house. After a few months, I started making bread. The KA mixer works much better than my previous mixer and I use a recipe similiar to Lorka's bread on here. My mix is sorghum/tapioca starch/potato or corn starch. I preheat the oven to 200 degrees, and put the loaf pan in, turn the oven off for about 20 minutes. That has been the best rising method for me. Then I kick the oven back on to 400 degrees and bake for 20 minutes. It took me awhile to figure out how to make the loaf rise correctly, but she always liked the taste. So, I kept working with it. We sub for eggs too.

Thanks for the lame advertisement, lol! I'm going to go check out that pan!! I may "need"it! :lol:


Mom of:

Carleigh~ 10 years old, allergic to wheat, milk, peanuts, strawberries, and many EAs. She is currently soy-light and egg-light ~ celiac testing inconclusive by allergist.

Gluten-Free since 10/05 She's a gymnast. : )

Nick ~ 13 years old with no known allergies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I preheat the oven to 200 degrees, and put the loaf pan in, turn the oven off for about 20 minutes. That has been the best rising method for me. Then I kick the oven back on to 400 degrees and bake for 20 minutes.

Do you take the bread out of the oven while it pre-heats to 400 or do you leave it in?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Do you take the bread out of the oven while it pre-heats to 400 or do you leave it in?

I preheat the oven to 200 while I'm mixing the bread, put the loaf pan in the oven, turn the oven off. I let the bread rise until it is just below the top the rim, checking with the oven light. In my oven, it takes about 15-20 minutes. Then I kick the oven back on to 400 and let it bake for another 20 minutes without taking the bread out while it preheats.

I hope that helps. :)


Mom of:

Carleigh~ 10 years old, allergic to wheat, milk, peanuts, strawberries, and many EAs. She is currently soy-light and egg-light ~ celiac testing inconclusive by allergist.

Gluten-Free since 10/05 She's a gymnast. : )

Nick ~ 13 years old with no known allergies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

I made this bread yesterday and it was really good. It turned out nice and light and fluffy, like regular bread.

Gluten-Free Flax Bread Recipe

My own recipe, comes out fluffy and nice and need not be frozen. Healthy and full of nutrition, as opposed to rice flour based breads. Can be vegan* This was the foundation recipe of my cookbook - after all of these (and so many others) fantastic reviews, I was inspired. Please check out my book at http://laurie.ecrater.com

by Laurie150

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter



Join eNewsletter