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dandelionmom

Anyone Have A Bunny Rabbit?

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I'm trying to find out if there is such a thing as gluten-free bunny pellets. Thanks for your help and for not laughing at me! :)

Hi dandelionmom,

I would think there might be rice-based rabbit food pellets. I know they do rice food for dogs and cats so on. Iams brand comes to mind. Like us, pets can be sensitive to gluten and wheat based foods.

Your best bet, I think would be check out a vet. Some vet offices sell those high end pet foods, again most are based on 'rice" formulas. Even, if your local vet does not carry pet food, they could direct you to a pet store that does carry those brands.

Also, read the labels. Like you read labels for your own food, after a while you get to know what 'words" are really derivatives of gluten. Most pet foods list ingredients, and the ingredient listings, would not differ all that much from human food.

Scratch bunny, behind the ear for me. :)

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44 yr old mom, SAHM (stay at home; aka a Retro Mama :D , 2 special needs kids dd 15yrs ds 4 yrs

Follows Compassion Rules "Treat others; they way you wish to be treated"

blood test negative: celiac However, doctor felt other factors in blood works warranted trying the gluten-free diet

April 7/08 Doctor confirms gluten intolerance/ remain gluten-free for 2 more months; and repeat tests

Gluten free since March 4/2008 (other than accidently, or unknown gluten used--- its a learning process, Gluten is everywhere!)

"People are like stained-glassed windows. Best viewed in the light!" unknown author

"I am only as strong as the coffee I drink, and the hairspray I use" :)

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This is a good site about feeding rabbits. Rabbits actually do better if hay is a substantial part of their diet.

http://www.bio.miami.edu/hare/diet.html

Perhaps the single most important item in the rabbit diet is grass HAY, and it should be fed in unlimited quantities to both adults and baby rabbits. A rabbit fed only commercial rabbit pellets does not get enough long fiber to keep the intestines in good working order. The long fibers in the hay push things through the gut and keep the intestinal muscles in good tone. In addition to keeping the intestinal contents moving at the rate at which nature intended, hay may also help prevent intestinal impactions caused by ingested hair or other indigestible items.

Alfalfa or clover hays, although tasty for the rabbit, are too rich in protein and calcium to be fed ad libitum. Instead, offer fresh grass hays such as timothy, oat, coastal, brome, Bahia or wheat.

I realize that wheat and oats are listed - but see some of the other choices - they are not gluten.

Rabbits are herbivores, and they require more than carrots and other veggies. Iceberg lettuce ) light green) is considered a poor choice for most rabbits and reptiles for that matter - they do better with dark green veggies like broccoli, carrot tops and dark lettuce.

A good-quality commercial rabbit pellet provides trace nutrients, vitamins and minerals that a rabbit might not get if fed only hay and fresh foods. However, very little pelleted food is required for good health. Many experienced rabbit veterinarians are now recommending no more than 1/8 cup of quality pellets per 5 lbs. of rabbit per day, and some even consider commercial pellets a "treat food" that can promote obesity in spayed/neutered adult rabbits. A rabbit fed too many pellets will often ignore his hay, to the detriment of his intestinal system!

They dont need gluten but rice is NOT part of a rabbits natural diet. Grass hays - as listed above - are gluten free and part of a healthy rabbit diet...

Sandy (AHT)


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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We were foster parents for a bunny for a short time and the vet recommended, as 2kids4me said, only a little pellets and timothy hay, which was easy to find in the stores.


Me: GLUTEN-FREE 7/06, multiple food allergies, T2 DIABETES DX 8/08, LADA-Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults, Who knew food allergies could trigger an autoimmune attack on the pancreas?! 1/11 Re-DX T1 DM, pos. DQ2 Celiac gene test 9/11

Son: ADHD '06,

neg. CELIAC PANEL 5/07

ALLERGY: "positive" blood and skin tests to wheat, which triggers his eczema '08

ENTEROLAB testing: elevated Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA Dec. '08

Gluten-free-Feb. '09

other food allergies

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I know this was written a long time ago, but I have 7 rabbits, all of whom are on a strict gluten free diet, including no oats.  This is not for them but for me!  The have cheap but tasty Grass Hay and Sherwood Forest Rabbit Pellets https://www.naturalrabbitfood.com/sherwood-forest-natural-rabbit-food/. Some of my rabbits took a couple of weeks to get used to it, some took a couple of seconds!  They all love it now.  I am breeding rabbits and selling them as suitable for a gluten allergy sufferer.  I ship the food and when I once ran out, I bought vitamin pellets and mini alfalfa bales and Timothy hay to see me through until the pellets order came.  It's very expensive for me because I am breeding and have quite a few, but I am well now, so for me it is worth it!

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I actually appreciate the info. I have a bunny and am very careful about what food I give her because I want her to have the best. Since this company does a free sample and it has almost identical nutrition info to the food I'm already feeding my princess I ordered a sample to give it a try. If she can be gluten free, I'll be very happy. :D


"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2011

CRPS DX March 2014

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It isn't something to be taken lightly, just like getting a dog or cat. They can be complicated pets at times, and you need to be ready to handle them. They need room to exercise properly and a house, if they will be indoors needs to be appropriately bunny-proofed for when they are allowed out for free time. Your daughter would also have to accept that they frequently are not cuddle pets. They are insanely rewarding, beyond words, but one of those rewards will almost certainly not be cuddling with it. If she's old enough for a dog or cat, and you're ready for the vet bills and care associated with one then go for it. I recommend a lop, downy eared bunnies are the best. (Totally an unbiased opinion. :P)


"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2011

CRPS DX March 2014

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I will disagree to my dear Addy,  Rabbits are cuddles!.  I do agree with the Lops being the BEST of the breeds. 

There is a huge difference about the cuddles, depending on the first human encounters the bunny has had.  Handled daily as youngsters, the rabbits still crave human touch.  Rabbits have hormones.  A male can be given a stuffed animal to be romantic with, a female needs time to calm down her hormones.  (A female may need two home bases.  She can become too territorial of home space and you need to keep her a little humble.)

 

That being said.  Every rabbit has it's own personality.  There are like a 2 year old.  They have a mind of their own, can be trained, have imaginations (will invent games to play with you), and will always seek out trouble given to much freedom.

 

Diet is important.  They need to constantly eat (hay and clean water are the most important).  Some tushy cleaning may be needed.  (Especially creases in the crotch area)  Nail clipping. 

 

Incredibly rewarding to bond with a bun bun.


Michigan

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