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kera87

Anyone Else Dealing With This While In College?

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Guest sru_gal_8504

im 22. i was just diagnosed recently. i have been battling all my life with this issue. it is annoying to be this way in college.

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I am a freshman in college and I am getting an apartment next year. But I was wondering what are some staple foods that people enjoy while they are on their own. I know I will be busy and I won't have time, all of the time, to make nice luxurious meals. I'll need something that isn't too time consuming yet healthy. Any suggestions?

I buy a lot of frozen vegetables, frozen fruits, and canned beans or gluten free soup just to make it easy. Then, I'll buy some fresh vegetables and Whole Foods sells gluten-free deli meat. You can also buy pre-packaged gluten-free oats (Bob's Red Mill), which make a quick and easy breakfast.

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I knew about the disability act when I came to college. That is why I chose the college that I did, but also I had the disease all of high school. I have heard the "i'd die" thing many times also. It does continue even with people that are not in college. The awareness is increasing thankfully! When I first started college it was rough to live in the dorms and try to accommodate myself. I had to have a private room with no roommate, I could not be on the meal plan and I had special permission to have a larger fridge and a convection microwave that also grilled. That was how I lived on campus for a year. I moved on campus after that year into an apartment. An apartment with roommates that dont have celiac really doesnt work. I now am in an apartment on my own and I had to get special permission from the campus board to move off campus but I just stated my case and my doctor even provided me with a letter to give them stating my disease and the requirements and what was best for me. They have been great about it.

It is hard to deal with it at college but it gets easier.

And for those who are 21 and would like to experience the college alcohol scene.......

- There is gluten-free beer. Krogers and Giant Eagle sell it. And also you can have tequila and rum... those I have personally tried and are ok . I have another friend at my college that she also drinks everclear, vodka, 99 bananas and apples and anything distilled. She stays to the triple distilled. I am not brave enough to try these, well I have tried the 99 series and didnt like the taste. So there is hope for a normal college life, but I dont like the party seen my whole college time I've maybe drank 5 nights and have never been drunk.

Ok back to the college and poor student budget. Ive found that walmart is absolutely amazing for my budget. In the frozen section there is John Soules Foods chicken/steak fajitas. These are gluten-free and make an awesome salad. Im a salad freak. And it isnt bad on the budget... the chicken is like $6 and the steak is $10. Also tgif fridays potato skins are amazing. Krogers has a gluten free section that has some good stuff, but can be expensive. For breakfast I typically have a yogurt (yoplait) or fruity pebbles cereal. Both of which are easy on the budget. Walmart also has deboles noodles and prego sauce which feeds me for a while on little money. I also like to use those asian noodles that are rice noodles and are in a big ball of one continuous noodle. I like the texture and the size of the noodle. They are skinnier and dont have a mushy texture. Oh also walmart has brownie mixes, muffin mixes and cookies. **Im not sure if every walmart does but in the 4 states that I have been in they have(indiana, ohio, West Virginia and PA) A lot of stuff I read labels on. Great Value stuff will also say whether or not you can have it. There is so much out there that a college student can have that is gluten-free.

**Also I cook all my food still in my convection/grill microwave. I have a magic chef and as my job is to sell appliances, I dont recommend magic chef but I definitely recommend a convection oven in the dorms if the college will allow it. It is so nice and so easy.

--There is a lot more information that I know if anyone needs more help just let me know. I dont like to seem like I am talking too much. I am so darn inquisitive that I do a lot of research and investigate everything, which leads to too much information. lol I hope I can help :/

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I'm a junior in college in Rhode Island and I just got diagnosed this October after being sick for a good 6 or 7 years. It is really tough being at school because the dining halls don't cater to this if they even know about it. I don't have a meal plan because I live off campus with a couple friends, but one of the cooks in our dining hall has celiac so he's pushed for kinnikinik bread and old el paso taco stuff and corn nachos that celiacs can have.

If you live on campus I would suggest going to dining services or the nutritionist at health services and tell them about your problems, they may have some ways to help or can push for dining services to get more food you can eat. If they don't do that you can probably get them to give you a waivor so you don't have to buy a meal plan and can spend your money on food you can actually eat.

Shaws and Stop & Shop have a good selection of gluten free foods, and the Natures Way (i believe) has delicious buckwheat wildberry waffles.

Luckily I have a great group of friends who are supportive of my eating habits. I don't drink, so they've already had two years of "waiiiiiiiit you don't drink?!?!" so they don't think it's as big of a deal when I found out I was allergic to beer. The most annoying thing is when everyone wants to go out to eat because I still don't like it. One of their favorite places is Chen's for Chinese food, and I clearly can't get that.

If your close friends still don't understand you can have them come on this forum and talk to some of us, that might help them understand better.

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Hey, Kera87. Trust me, I totally know how difficult it can be. I was officially diagnosed with Celiac a week ago, but have had an intolerance to it for years. The only thing that saved my hide was my mother, who was diagnosed about 4 years ago.

College had to of been one of the worst places for me to try to adhere to the lifestyle, but gluten free can be done, and on a budget. There is even a few gluten free beers, one of which (Redbridge), is very good and made from sorghum. Throw me a line if you are interested in some recipes.

~Thommy-girl1

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Hi I am also a 22 year old college student. I live off campus, in a different town because I work their so if I lived around campus I would still have to drive either way so I just live off campus and dirve to school. I really understnad that fear of leaving class or running out of class. Some of my friends ride the bus to campus and they ask me if I want to ride sometimes, but I just couldn't. I have to much of a fear that I might "mess" myself if you catch my drift. The worst was my sophmore year because I basically quit eating before morning classes because it is a 20 min commute from home with no bathrooms or gas stations along the way!! Hang in there though, it does get worse. Don't worry about the beer thing too much, they will all have beer gut's or drinking problems after college anyway and you will still be fine. Goodluck, if you want any help or just to chat to another college student, just PM me!!

Hope this helps, Sean.

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Oh god I feel all of you guys pain. I have 5 roommates and a couple of them constantly question me on why I need my own pan to cook in, and how bad it can possibly be. Then they'll make fun of what I can and can't eat. Like I chose to be this way. Ugh.

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to the OP, you got diagnosed about the same time i did, i probably had this for years and didnt know. its hard but being in an apartment does help, last year when i was still the the dorms eating sucked, i did it just to sustain my self because almost all the dining hall food was glutened.

my friends seem to be really understanding, but then again i am in the arts so people being on weird diets (vegi, vegan, gluten free what ever) isnt uncommon and a lot of people around here at least have heard of gluten. also helps some that i dont party much and even if i do i dont drink much but what i do drink is usually hard liquor (any my brands of choice are not made from grains) .

i am a very strong willed person and stick to my guns well so when people give me crap i explain it to them and 99% of the time they understand and dont give a second thought to it.

and to those that say they wouldnt live with out glutened stuff i just say, if you had the digestive issues you would learn real quick

-matt

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I totally understand how you feel. I am in college and working at McDonalds. So when I'm at school I can't eat anything in the cafeteria and have to bring my lunch and if I don't I go without food, and at work people are always wondering why I eat the way I do, and trying to give me food that I can't have. What I would suggest is getting a gluten free cookbook if you haven't already and try making food that you can take with you for school or something, and try to ignore the remarks people make. I know how hard that is to hear people say things like dying without something because I'm always hearing poor Allison can't have this or can't have that. All I can say is it will get easier as your body starts to adjust and you learn more about it. Until then I wish you luck.

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I totally understand how you feel. I am in college and working at McDonalds. So when I'm at school I can't eat anything in the cafeteria and have to bring my lunch and if I don't I go without food, and at work people are always wondering why I eat the way I do, and trying to give me food that I can't have. What I would suggest is getting a gluten free cookbook if you haven't already and try making food that you can take with you for school or something, and try to ignore the remarks people make. I know how hard that is to hear people say things like dying without something because I'm always hearing poor Allison can't have this or can't have that. All I can say is it will get easier as your body starts to adjust and you learn more about it. Until then I wish you luck.

eh i dont know if i could deal with working at a place that was making food with gluten, not because of temptation just because i would be worried i would contaminate my self.

as to the cook book, great suggestion but i suggest to not waste money on gluten free cooking for dummies, it has a few good recipes but it never lists which things to look for to make sue they are gluten free and at first that caused a lot of issues for me. also some of the meals were just really bland or nasty, but it does have a killer meatloaf recipe

my sister sent me "1000 gluten free recipes" which seems to be better quality stuff over all and gives good info on flour mixes and stuff

-matt

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I'm in med school. I live off campus and I make everything myself from scratch. What's most annoying for me is that we have tons of free lunches at school and its ALWAYS pizza or subway. So I'm perpetually surrounded by people scarfing down pizza while I sit in lunch lectures which gets old. At least since I'm in medschool most of my friends actually understand celiac and try to be supportive for me. Next year I have to be in the hospital every day, sometimes for 36 hours straight, and its going to be a total PITA to lug enough food with me to get thru that! And I'm going to have to talk to each rotation and make sure I have access to a fridge and a microwave. I hate hate hate calling attention to myself so this is going to be hard for me. Sometimes I wish I could just be young and careless like so many of my friends but I'm also happy that I figured out what was making me so sick so early. When I read about the peeps who only figured it out in their 40's it makes me want to cry, thinking about feeling so awful for your whole life.

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I'm in med school. I live off campus and I make everything myself from scratch. What's most annoying for me is that we have tons of free lunches at school and its ALWAYS pizza or subway. So I'm perpetually surrounded by people scarfing down pizza while I sit in lunch lectures which gets old. At least since I'm in medschool most of my friends actually understand celiac and try to be supportive for me. Next year I have to be in the hospital every day, sometimes for 36 hours straight, and its going to be a total PITA to lug enough food with me to get thru that! And I'm going to have to talk to each rotation and make sure I have access to a fridge and a microwave. I hate hate hate calling attention to myself so this is going to be hard for me. Sometimes I wish I could just be young and careless like so many of my friends but I'm also happy that I figured out what was making me so sick so early. When I read about the peeps who only figured it out in their 40's it makes me want to cry, thinking about feeling so awful for your whole life.

ya and just as an fyi to you and everyone, if you have issues getting access to what you need at work/school be it food provided that is gluten-free or fridge/microwave access just show them the americans with disabilities act (you know that annoying thing they talk about at the start of the semester in every class that lets ADD people get more time and note takers or people who have issues with reading like dyslexia have more time or have other things to help). they legally have to provide help for you

-matt

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I was diagnosed by Sophmore year of HS and i'm now in my second year of college. I live on my own but its still pretty tough. I seem to run out of ideas for dinner a lot lol.

At first I was going to go to college about 45 min away and live on campus. I tried to get the dining hall to work with me, using the disabilities act,etc but they weren't very helpful. So I went to a college in my hometown and lived at home.

I'm now on my own and its fun but still kinda hard. There are times where I really wish I could just order a pizza or something. Gluten Free Pantrys French Bread mix makes an excellent pizza though if anyone wants a good pizza recipe.

Chipotle burrito bowls are my savior on days I don't feel like cooking LOL.

The whole friends thing is hard because they don't understand. I've had friends who only think I can't eat wheat.

Rebridge isn't bad, a little expensive though, I think An(can't spell it) Busch make it. Wine is also gluten-free.

My degree can be done completely online but i'm doing a combo of both online and on campus. I like online as I feel thats how I learn best, but I also like going to campus and interacting with other students.

Planing is a big part of it. Making sure you have a snack with you too is good, but man there are times where I wish I could just stop and get a sandwich while i'm at school.

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Hello all. I am 22 years old, and was diagnosed with celiac disease a year ago. This was at the same time as a diagnosis for Polycystic Ovarian Disease. I have been struggling with following the diet as I am the only celiac in my home, and my family isn't very supportive in helping me with living gluten-free. I am also finding it very hard to live gluten free on my very limited income. I know it is important to follow the strict diet, but I guess my will power isn't strong enough to eliminate my favorite foods.

I come from an Italian family, and saying no to pasta is rather akin to sin. I've tried gluten-free pastas, and just don't like them. I love bread, cakes, etc., but again can't stand a gluten-free baked good.

I've had a friend make me a gluten-free cake for my birthday that was amazingly good, and may have to try to find her recipe.

I have come to this site to hopefully get the support I believe I need to get healthy with celiac disease.

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Hello all. I am 22 years old, and was diagnosed with celiac disease a year ago. This was at the same time as a diagnosis for Polycystic Ovarian Disease. I have been struggling with following the diet as I am the only celiac in my home, and my family isn't very supportive in helping me with living gluten-free. I am also finding it very hard to live gluten free on my very limited income. I know it is important to follow the strict diet, but I guess my will power isn't strong enough to eliminate my favorite foods.

I come from an Italian family, and saying no to pasta is rather akin to sin. I've tried gluten-free pastas, and just don't like them. I love bread, cakes, etc., but again can't stand a gluten-free baked good.

I've had a friend make me a gluten-free cake for my birthday that was amazingly good, and may have to try to find her recipe.

I have come to this site to hopefully get the support I believe I need to get healthy with celiac disease.

i come from an italian family as well, as to the pasta issue bionatur

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Wow it's so awesome to read your guys' posts. I've just been diagnosed a week ago...but I've dealt with it this my whole life. When I was in 1-12 I would freak out every day because every day I had diarrhea, and I hate using public bathrooms when I do have it. However, being 20 now my first year of college this was how I treated it...(I still didn't know that wheat, flour, eggs, dairy, mushrooms, and garlic effected my stomach)...I would have a bathroom bag. I had diarrhea everyday, and living in the dorms...there was only that public bathroom. So in my bathroom bag was this...

1. A bottle of Febreze (usually tried to use the seasonal, like the baking one for xmas xD)

2. Ipod (come on its diarrhea, you just got to turn up the volume so you can't hear it..and don't hold back XDDDDDDDDD)

3. Then my own toilet paper...because having the runs is hard enough...like i'm going to use the dorm's tp!

However, fall semester last year I failed out of school. :/ I missed to many classes..and when I went to go get help it was to late. So now that I am taking this medicine to get rid of stuff in my body..and put the good bacteria in, eating better, and not eating what i'm not supposed to eat I feel so much better now. Like a regular person. Although it will take me a long time until I can feel comfortable traveling and not having to worry "where is the nearest bathroom!!!!!!!!"

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Wow it's so awesome to read your guys' posts. I've just been diagnosed a week ago...but I've dealt with it this my whole life. When I was in 1-12 I would freak out every day because every day I had diarrhea, and I hate using public bathrooms when I do have it. However, being 20 now my first year of college this was how I treated it...(I still didn't know that wheat, flour, eggs, dairy, mushrooms, and garlic effected my stomach)...I would have a bathroom bag. I had diarrhea everyday, and living in the dorms...there was only that public bathroom. So in my bathroom bag was this...

1. A bottle of Febreze (usually tried to use the seasonal, like the baking one for xmas xD)

2. Ipod (come on its diarrhea, you just got to turn up the volume so you can't hear it..and don't hold back XDDDDDDDDD)

3. Then my own toilet paper...because having the runs is hard enough...like i'm going to use the dorm's tp!

However, fall semester last year I failed out of school. :/ I missed to many classes..and when I went to go get help it was to late. So now that I am taking this medicine to get rid of stuff in my body..and put the good bacteria in, eating better, and not eating what i'm not supposed to eat I feel so much better now. Like a regular person. Although it will take me a long time until I can feel comfortable traveling and not having to worry "where is the nearest bathroom!!!!!!!!"

i feel you, i took immodium every day usually a full dose in the morning when i woke up for the last few years of HS and most of the first year of college, usually you can get your transcript noted after the fact that it was a medical reason to the bad grades so you dont screw your self over

-matt

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im in my second year of college now and i still live on campus, which means, i have to eat school cafeteria food which is not too catering to my needs. its definitely hard to stick with a gluten free diet because and i do slip up very often. i dont think i have made it a week being completely gluten free. i am desperate to get my own apartment so i can moniter all of my food. it doesnt make it any easier that my friends dont really understand it either and they are constantly buying glutenous food and chowing down in front of me, offering some to me, and all of that. i must say, i quite admire your discipline for being able to stick to your diet under college stress.

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im in my second year of college now and i still live on campus, which means, i have to eat school cafeteria food which is not too catering to my needs. its definitely hard to stick with a gluten free diet because and i do slip up very often. i dont think i have made it a week being completely gluten free. i am desperate to get my own apartment so i can moniter all of my food. it doesnt make it any easier that my friends dont really understand it either and they are constantly buying glutenous food and chowing down in front of me, offering some to me, and all of that. i must say, i quite admire your discipline for being able to stick to your diet under college stress.

contact your dining services and they should give you a list of what is ok, if they dont or if they dont have a realistic amount (i.e. there is not always a gluten-free option) you can and should pull the students with disabilities routine (you know the thing that all the ADD kids get to use to get more time) because legally they must give you food you can eat.

as to your friends once you explain to them that gluten= poison and that gluten is from wheat rye barley and spelt and anything made from it then they usually get it, all of mine did. dont expect your friends to not eat gluten food around you, its not a peanut allergy where being near it will set you off, it is a bit depressing but ya, just something you have to get used to.

as to doing it under college stress, i would bet that once you can get off gluten (the summer is a great time to start since you can regulate your self more if your going back home) the stress will be much easier to deal with

-matt

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To add another post, I too am in college I am 23 diagnosed a year and a half ago. Finding food has been hard as well as explaining to people why I'm skinny, can't eat anything, and miss class. Even friends who I've explained it to 2 or 4 times still offer me bread and beer. So I feel all of you. I also make larger meals and freeze small containers for nights I don't have time. I make all of my meals from scratch as well and eat lost of nuts, fresh fruits and vegetables. So far all batter I have made freeze well whether it's for muffins, cookies or biscuits so I make large batches. I have not found any gluten free food on campus. I'm working on fixing that with disable students services and the nutritionist on campus. In the mean time I often have to go home in between classes if I don't pack food a head of time. Nature's path and a few other brands make decent cornflakes if you can find them. All flours and cereal are really expensive though my diet costs me a lot of money. I really don't eat out at all and I take a flask with me everywhere to drink. I have found I react horribly to wheat or barley liquors no matter how many times they are filtered or distilled. I drink only 100% agave tequila ie Milagro or Patron with cranberry juice. That combo is almost always gluten free at any bar. However bartenders and those little hoses they use that also spew all kinds of gluten liquid always provide the possibility of mistakes and cross contamination. So I use the flask as much as possible.

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Hey guys, this is my first post and I'm just wondering if anyone else out there is going though this while in college. I was diaganosed in January and was devastated at first, but I'm dealing with it as best as I can now. I'm lucky enough that I live in an apartment where I can cook my own food, but it is still hard on a daily basis. At home, it's really easy because I have a very supportive family who make sure nothing gets contaminated and my mom loves to cook new things.

However, at school it's a different story. People our age just do not understand what it is like to have to run out of class because of an attack, or not be able to have a beer (i cant tell you how many people told me they'd "die" without it), or skip out on going to a restuarant. I basically eat rice almost everyday because it is the one thing that I can eat without feeling sick right now, and my friends think its the weirdest thing and openly laugh at me. I feel really alone at school and often call my family crying because of it.

For those of you who have had celiac for a while, how long did it take for you to heal? (i'm very strict with not eating gluten, but have supposedly had it for over a year without knowing) And if anyone wants to talk and share their experiences I'm very open to it because I'd love to talk to people who actually understand. Thanks :)

Oh wow, well I'm going into my senior year of high school and it is highly likely that I may be celiac. Though from reading your post, it's hard to believe that you must not know whats all out there for those who are Celiac. I've only been looking information up for about a week, and living in a dorm being Celiac would be just as fun as not. Eating in the a college cafertiera, you will be limit to things... but I'm sure the varieties are there. There is also more to eat than just rice everyday, my food options I've experience are countless. I'm looking forward to college, and it couldn't possibly be depressing as from what I'm reading.

Oh yeah, there are also many resturants you can eat at... just ask for a gluten free menu, or be very selective with your food when eating out.

I've read that some people have recovered from being Celiac, while others havent. Though in Austrialia there are trying to find a cure ... right now

________________________________________

I didn't know that university cafertieras must give you gluten free menu, well that will be helpful if I find out I'am Celiac or not.

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Hey everyone. This is my first post, and I'm so glad I found the college section. I can definitely relate to everything that's been said - I was diagnosed a few months ago after having a helish start to my senior year. It's been so miserable and I just want to get better, since I'm moving across the country in July to start law school! My friends have been fairly supportive, but I live with my boyfriend (he's older - 27), we've been together for 5 years and he's trying to be supportive but he's still got this college, frat boy mentality. He LOVES pizza, bread, pasta, you name it, and is having a hard time trying my gluten free meals.

Also, it's my graduation weekend coming up starting this Friday. My whole family is coming into town and we're going out for dinner twice. The first place has gluten free items listed on their menu so that's fine, but the other doesn't, but I called and they said the chef could make something gluten free for me. Any ideas on how to navigate this situation? There will be 12 people at the table and I just don't want to make a scene. I haven't eaten out since I was diagnosed, and I'm soo sensitive to gluten so I'm scared to get sick, since I'm walking in the ceremony on Sunday afternoon! I'm so nervous about the whole weekend! Does anyone have any ideas for me? This is unchartered territory and I just need something to calm my nerves a bit. Thanks!

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Hey guys, this is my first post and I'm just wondering if anyone else out there is going though this while in college. I was diaganosed in January and was devastated at first, but I'm dealing with it as best as I can now. I'm lucky enough that I live in an apartment where I can cook my own food, but it is still hard on a daily basis. At home, it's really easy because I have a very supportive family who make sure nothing gets contaminated and my mom loves to cook new things.

However, at school it's a different story. People our age just do not understand what it is like to have to run out of class because of an attack, or not be able to have a beer (i cant tell you how many people told me they'd "die" without it), or skip out on going to a restuarant. I basically eat rice almost everyday because it is the one thing that I can eat without feeling sick right now, and my friends think its the weirdest thing and openly laugh at me. I feel really alone at school and often call my family crying because of it.

For those of you who have had celiac for a while, how long did it take for you to heal? (i'm very strict with not eating gluten, but have supposedly had it for over a year without knowing) And if anyone wants to talk and share their experiences I'm very open to it because I'd love to talk to people who actually understand. Thanks :)

I'm also a college student and was diagnosed in April. My friends have actually been very understanding and generally check with me before going to a restaurant. Since I have a tendency to not speak up if there's a problem, a few friends have even take to checking the menu themselves to see if there's something I can eat there. We also get together and cook a lot, often in my kitchen and my friends know not to bring things that I can't eat into the kitchen. They are free to eat crackers out in the living room where there's not chance of them getting into the food. It helps that I am probably the biggest drinker of us all and the most I have is maybe a glass of wine with dinner every once a never.

I realize how absolutely lucky I got with my friends and the fact that they have no problem putting up with my weird diet restrictions. (I'm also lactose intolerant and don't eat pork). I've discovered that Indian and Japanese cousin is generally gluten friendly. And you can almost always order a salad with everything on the side. (My friends have also taken to letting me order last so I can give my long list of food requirements).

It's actually when I went home that I had problems. My mom has trouble grasping "for life" and wants to try to re-introduce gluten into my diet at some point. My father just refuses to change his diet in any way, even though I am home for maybe three weeks of the year. My parents did drive out and help me stock the kitchen so that I can survive even without friend help. But it was weird that my friends could grasp just how limited I am better than my parents could.

I've also taken to carrying home made trail mix bars with me. If there is absolutely nothing I can order at the restaurant, I know that I have at least something I can eat.

I do hope you can find more supportive friends.

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Wow, its been so long since I posted this topic, and I have to say my outlook has changed a lot. I want to thank everyone who has posted or given me advice, it is GREATLY appreciated - i was able to read almost all of them :) Since I posted, I've graduated from college which has been great for my health because I am back to eating at home where I know my food is safe. I'm still not 100%...i think I get secretly glutened from time to time, it's just so hard to avoid at restaruants!

One thing I've mainly learned is to just always be open about it. By making it known to friends and family and talking about it in a non awkard way, it prevents you having to explain everytime you bring beer to a party or bring a protein bar to a restuarant. When I go out to eat with large groups I try to sit on the outside so I can easily talk to the waitor and the best thing is just to always order everything plain....not as yummy but who cares. When I went to my senior formal I was paranoid about eating but they ended up having lots of fresh cheeses, fruit and a carving station which i figured was fine. One graduation party I went to had a buffet, and I couldn't eat any of it (all had sauces and stuff on top) so I found a manager and they brought me a steak! It pays to ask.

My school friends are actually great, they've gotten so used to it, I just needed to give them a chance. THey truly are a blessing. My home friends on the other hand....one called me a picky eater the other day. I think she forgot about the whole gluten thing but I was quick to remind her :) I am not picky by choice and I eat basically everything everyone else does, just modified. Thats something I wish everyone understood.

And lastly, I highly suggest reading Elisabeth Hasselbecks new book, it has some great advice because she went through all of this in college as well. She has such great tips!

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