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Crimson

Enterolab Results

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Opinions?

I've been pretty sick though getting better over the past three months.

I've been weeding out gluten sources for a couple of months though I've been wheat free for two years.

I've known for a couple of years that the wheat has a bad effect on my system.

I'm still having issues. I'm still figuring out which foods affect me and how.

Like tomato = very very bad!

Peanuts I knew over a year ago were terrible for me....

there are many similarities.

Can you develop celiac with these genes?

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0202

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: Although you do not possess the main HLA-DQB1 genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302). Having two copies of a gluten sensitive gene means that each of your parents and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity may be more severe.

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Yes, the Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2 (Subtype 2), otherwise known as DQ2 is a celiac gene.

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Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: Although you do not possess the main HLA-DQB1 genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity

I'm not all that great at the "gene thing"....never could figure it out myself...but according to the report Enterolab is stating that you do not carry either of the main Celiac genes.

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Hi Crimson,

Wow, your genes are really close to mine! Here were my results:

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: HLA-DQB1 gene analysis reveals that you have one of the main genes that predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302. Each of your offspring has a 50% chance of receiving this gene from you, and at least one of your parents passed it to you. You also have a non-celiac gene predisposing to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302). Having one celiac gene and one gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of a gluten sensitive gene. Having two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac disease may be more severe.

The difference, you'll notice, is that I have 0201 vs. your 0202. If you check out the link below, you can see that 0201 is sometimes referred to as DQ2.5 and 0202 as DQ2.2. It is the DQ2.5 that is most commonly associated with Celiac. I also find the chart towards the middle on the right side interesting. It shows the frequency of the genes in caucasian Americans

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HLA-DQ

Here are some quotes from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coeliac_disease:

Over 95% of coeliac patients have an isoform of DQ2 (encoded by DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 genes) and DQ8 (encoded by the haplotype DQA1*03:DQB1*0302), which is inherited in families

Most coeliac patients bear a two-gene HLA-DQ haplotype referred to as DQ2.5 haplotype. This haplotype is composed of 2 adjacent gene alleles, DQA1*0501 and DQB1*0201, which encode the two subunits, DQ α5 and DQ β2

That said, it is my understanding from this site that there are several members who have confirmed Celiac without the genes usually associated to Celiac. Here is another quote from the article to back that up:

Among the 6% of European celiacs that do not have DQ2.5(cis or trans) or DQ8, 4% are DQ2 and 2% DQA1*05, 0.4% cannot be linked to DQ8, DQA1*05, or DQB1*02.[33]

So basically, I think it means about 4% of Celiacs without DQ8 or DQ2.5 have a DQ2 such as yours. Anyway, I'm a firm believer that if they diet makes you feel better, stick to it...regardless of genes and/or celiac vs. sensitivity!

Take care,

Jennifer

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You have the same genetic results from Enterolab that my son did. We ended up getting testing through a GI Dr. and part of that was a genetic test through Prometheus. They must look at it a bit differently because that test came back saying he is 16x's more likely than the general population to develop celiac and that he does have a celiac gene. The best I could figure out using the wikipedia that someone referenced is that each gene alone is not a celiac gene, however the piece that is missing from the DQ2.2 can be completed by a DQ7. I think there is more than one type for the DQ7 like there is for the DQ2, but I'm not sure.

His results were classified on a chart with categories from 1-8. One is the lowest with the results being negative for DQ2 and DQ8. Eight is the highest and that would be a person with two DQ2 genes and they are 32x's more likely to have celiac. My sons came in at number 7 and he is considered to have DQ2/other high risk gene. I always was under the impression that they just checked for DQ2 or DQ8, but they must take the other genes into account even though these results do not tell me what that other gene is.

I really should just type up our whole experience with this and put it one my website because it's been fascinating and I learned things that even with all the research I had done I was suprised to learn. My son ended up having a scope done and in the samples they took found no celiac disease. However, with his risk factor the GI Dr. wants him on a 3 month gluten free diet followed by a challenge. He's about 2-3 weeks into the diet and we've noticed he's doing much better already. The blood tests he had done for celiac were negative, but those were done through Quest labs.

For anyone interested the chart from prometheus was as follows:

Overall Risks for Patients Carrying the DQ Genotype

Category #/ DQ Genotype/ Increased Risk Over General Population/ Relative Risk

8 DQ2 Homozygous 31x Extremely High

7 DQ2/other high risk gene 16x Very High

6 DQ2/DQ8 14x Very High

5 DQ8 Homozygous 10x High

4 DQ2 Heterozygous 10x High

3 DQ8 Heterozygous 2x Moderate

2 DQ2/other low risk gene <1x Low

1 DQ2-, DQ8- <.01x Extremely Low

Edited to add that the chart did not post very readable and everything ran together, but hopefully you can still make out what it means :o)

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Hi Holiday16,

I'm really glad this thread was started! I've seen the chart you included before, but didn't have any idea if DQ7 was considered "other high risk", "other low risk" or just "heterozygous" (category 7,4 or 2).

Thanks,

Jennifer

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Thank you for your replies! You've no idea how much I appreciate them.

I pretty much know and have known for some time that wheat and gluten now are serious issues for me.

Luckily my family is quite supportive of my diet and new lifestyle. They saw how skinny and sick I had gotten

from all this. For a while I was losing a pound a day!

I had started two years ago on the O blood type diet which eliminates dairy (I've been lactose intollorant for fifteen yars anyway), corn and wheat. I really did feel great for over a year. I was before that practically vegan and overrun with candida, stomach issues, joint pain and terrible migraines since I was a child. I have issues with my gallbladder. Though I'm thinking that that all stems from gut issues with gluten.

Ok, so three months or so ago, I decided to cut out all refined and grain carbohydrates.

I did that for a week. When I went back to eating "normally" *that is normal for me, the O blood type diet* Oat meal was one of the first things I started eating again. I see now where this all started. I got seriously ill. D all day every day, I was more hungry than usual and got to the point where I was still eating but was afraid of food. (certainly NOT me, I love food~!)

My MIL suggested celiac. I say "nahhh, I don't eat wheat" Hah!

Some where in the middle of this I get my secreter status tested and find that I am a non secreter. Which according to Dr. D'Adamo is supposed to make you 200% more likely than others to develop Celiac.

That is when I took my MIL's suggestion to heart.

So, I start researching the obvious malabsorption, D and all the other wacky stuff that was, has been and is going on with me....and here I am. Reading about all these wonderful people with such similar health backrounds and issues!

It's quite strange, actually.

Needless to say no matter what any test I take says, I am gluten free now.

I wish I had more faith in the health care profession.... I might actually give a Dr. a chance.

But I honestly do not think that 15 minutes with a doctor could tell me any more than what I'm able to find myself.

Maybe soon, I'll decide to have some of the other enterolab testing done....idk.

Again, thank you all!

Crimson

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Crimson,

Although you do not have a WHOLE celiac gene, your two genes come together to form the celiac gene. The beta part of the DQ2.2 gene is the same as the beta part in the celiac gene DQ2.5. The DQ7 gene you have is the same as the alpha part in the celiac gene DQ2.5. Enterolab doesn't tell people this, but it is true. I just don't think it is common.

This is known and accepted in the medical world. Yes you have a genetic link.

DQ2.2 alone and DQ7 alone have both been linked with celiac, just rarely.

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Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: Although you do not possess the main HLA-DQB1 genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302).

Sorry for my misunderstanding with my earlier post.

They've changed their descriptions from when I had my test done 2 years ago.

They didn't have the colored part of the quote above, just the HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8.

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Thank you fedora! I was reading all the stuff on the genes on wiki and the enterolab site.

It was also mentioned on here that a child that has been diagnosed is a match to my genes.

It doesn't surprise me. It just makes me wonder if I SHOULD seek medical help.

I am more of a natural remedy type of person. I've always done well with myself.

This is all just a bit overwhelming. I'm not convinced that a doctor would take that feeling away

or make it worse.

So, if I had done the tests with another lab, I may be considered celiac...

why is enterolab so different?

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Since this thread is titled Enterolab, I wanted to see what anyone had to say about my gene test. I just got the results today and have done a lot of reading trying to figure it out. I think I am clear but would like input just in case.

HLA-DQB1 0201

HLA-DQB1 0402

serological equivalent HLA-DQ 2.4 (subtype 2,4)

Thanks!

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tipnpat,

You HLA-DQB1 0201 is the celiac gene DQ2.5

Your other gene is not associated with gluten intolerance at all.

One gene is enough though. Did you have other tests done too?

Crimson,

I am a naturally remedy type of girl too. I also do not like going to the dr. I always leave frustrated and/or mad. I also question when I should go or not. I worry about some things, like my bones. I am still figuring out what to have checked. I am taking liquid iron and vitamin Bs. Also taking calcium, mag, and vit. D.

Did you have malabsorption on your enterolab test? Positive gluten antibodies, positive tTg antibodies and malabsorption, celiac gene, and positive dietary response would make me assume you have celiac. Good luck

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I will likely be having the tests done soon. I do not have health insurance. (WV jobs are not that great at giving insurance. I stay at home with my daughter and do some work out of my home. So, I have to gather the extra money for this... I'm sure some can relate. Especially with the economy going like it is at the moment. I have rants about that. I will not expose you to them though. :) )

I wanted to test for the genetic connection first, then go from there.

So far I've found this liquid vitamin that has helped tremendously! Lame Advertisement's Natural Vitality Organic Life Vitamins.

It seems to cover everything but the calcium/magnesium. I am worried about that. I'd like to find a liquid that doesn't have artificial sweeteners in it. I'm on the look out though. But I'm getting up and moving, lifting weights well again.

I can't complain. My stomach is ok. It's not worse than it's ever been like it was the last few months.

I think it's odd how you have moderate stomach issues then BAM you're a total wreck. It's like your digestive system just says "that's it, I"VE HAD IT!" and quits.

I digress.

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fedora,

I did have the other usual Enterolab tests done and all, including casein, were abnormal except for the malabsorption. I have a significant reaction to gluten when I eat it now so I'm thinking I'm a Celiac, but definitely not full blown. I think I caught it early.

My son, incidentally, tested positive for IgG antibodies to wheat, soy, milk, eggs, and cane sugar. I'm thinking, no, I'm definitely going to have him tested too but since I have the gene I'm going to see if his doctor will send us to our genetic center or at least order it so that insurance will cover it. My husband has Factor V Leiden so we definitely have reason for genetic counseling.

Thanks,

tipnpat

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Crimson,

I can relate. I have insurance but my deductable is $3500 plus my monthly bill. It is a health savings account compatible one.It is crazy. But I thought there was something wrong with me so I got it. Turns out I was right. I have to pay for everything so I don't go in much.

I take a liquied iron, vit B called floravital by floradix. I don't think their calcium, mag. is gluten free though. I know what you mean about your body just going beserk. That happened to me as a kid. My adult symptoms evolved slower. Still no fun.

Glad you are feeling better.

tipnpat,

good luck. I had my DD tested for celiac and allergies because her insurance would cover it. they didn't run the gene test or do all the celiac blood tests. frustrating. so her one blood test came back negative. I am awaiting her enterolab results now. I am praying they come today. I don't blame you for wanting to get genetic testing. I hope your son is clear.

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really interesting thread.

Yes, they have just changed the descriptions, and the 2,2 and 2,5 DQ2 gene differences are all new.

No, I not think it has to do with the alpha chains, and I think the 2,2 does not mean one had half the DQ2 gene in my understanding.

The half chain thing is explained in several posts in Thefooddoc's blog. It is about enterolab and certain other labs only testing fro the beta chain, thus missing half DQ2 genes that are in the alpha chain (0501 as far as I remebmber, in the alpha chain)

Please correct me if I am wrong.

https://www.celiac.com/articles/21567/1/Ten...ting/Page1.html

http://thefooddoc.blogspot.com/2008/02/upd...ac-disease.html

here something more about DQ7 is someone is interested:

http://www.clinchem.org/cgi/content/full/44/8/1755

aand here about 61 out of 1008 celiacs not having DQ2 or 8, and that would in my understanding mean all DQ2 as they did not differentiate bwtween them before

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12651074

The thing is, that enterolab does not report the alpha chains, so the DQ2, 2 thing cannot meanhalf a gene....and the difference thing is new.

Now upon re-reading the chinchem article, the thing in there http://www.clinchem.org/cgi/content-nw/full/44/8/1755/T1 about the DQA1 0501 (meaning alpha allele, half hte DQ2 gene) and BQB1 (beta allele, meaning half the DQ2 2,5 gene) suddenly makes more sense.

nora

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Holiday 16,

On the list below do you know the difference in #4 and #2. What would the difference in DQ2 heterozygous and DQ2/other low risk gene be? Just curious.

Thanks,

tipnpat

Overall Risks for Patients Carrying the DQ Genotype

Category #/ DQ Genotype/ Increased Risk Over General Population/ Relative Risk

8 DQ2 Homozygous 31x Extremely High

7 DQ2/other high risk gene 16x Very High

6 DQ2/DQ8 14x Very High

5 DQ8 Homozygous 10x High

4 DQ2 Heterozygous 10x High

3 DQ8 Heterozygous 2x Moderate

2 DQ2/other low risk gene <1x Low

1 DQ2-, DQ8- <.01x Extremely Low

Edited to add that the chart did not post very readable and everything ran together, but hopefully you can still make out what it means :o)

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Could possibly mean that it means that there are the different risk DQ2 involved.

Notte that they did not differentiate between the different DQ2 genes by calling them 2,2 or 2,5 yet. That seems to be quite new. But they must mean that (I think).

They probably assume that the only ones reading this are other scientists who are experts in celiac genes......and who would know that.

Just thinking.

nora

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Holiday 16,

On the list below do you know the difference in #4 and #2. What would the difference in DQ2 heterozygous and DQ2/other low risk gene be? Just curious.

Thanks,

tipnpat

Overall Risks for Patients Carrying the DQ Genotype

Category #/ DQ Genotype/ Increased Risk Over General Population/ Relative Risk

8 DQ2 Homozygous 31x Extremely High

7 DQ2/other high risk gene 16x Very High

6 DQ2/DQ8 14x Very High

5 DQ8 Homozygous 10x High

4 DQ2 Heterozygous 10x High

3 DQ8 Heterozygous 2x Moderate

2 DQ2/other low risk gene <1x Low

1 DQ2-, DQ8- <.01x Extremely Low

Edited to add that the chart did not post very readable and everything ran together, but hopefully you can still make out what it means :o)

I don't know what the other ones mean-wish I did. The only reason I knew what the other one for my son was is because we had both Enterolab and Prometheus genetic testing done. Without the Enterolab testing I would never have known his was DQ 2.2 and the other gene was DQ7. I wish they gave more detail with Prometheus. I'll have to ask his GI how common his is because he kept saying he wanted to give me a copy of the results because they were very interesting and that with such a high risk even though all testing was negative he wanted him to try the diet.

Paulette

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I was reading information of The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center and noted that they recommend Prometheus or Mayo Clinic for serum testing but Kimball Labs for genetic testing. Kimball does a much more thorough testing, I think and maybe that is why the discrepency even though Prometheus offers genetic testing. It's an interesting website that someone above posted. Gives legitimacy to the high occurence rate of Celiac.

tipnpat

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This is fascinating and confusing. I think that my understanding of all this is that the 2,2 versus 2.2 have different meanings.

We have two genes and each has two alleles, so there are four different combinations possible. What I understand is that Enterolab only tests the beta, or second half. So you notice that all of our results say B1...

So my results are that I have two B1 0201, but that is just the two beta parts of my 4 possible alleles. What I think is that I don't know what the alpha part is :( . On the link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HLA-DQ, you notice it says "some" common halotypes, so we can't assume that having a B1 0201 is for sure the 2.5 because we don't know what the alpha is.

Therefore, my interpretation of my results is that I am 2,2, but I don't know if I have both 2 copies of 2.5, 2 copies of 2.2 or one of each.

It looks like there are different understandings of all of this, I wonder how Enterolab would explain it? Has anyone asked?

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This is fascinating and confusing. I think that my understanding of all this is that the 2,2 versus 2.2 have different meanings.

We have two genes and each has two alleles, so there are four different combinations possible. What I understand is that Enterolab only tests the beta, or second half. So you notice that all of our results say B1...

So my results are that I have two B1 0201, but that is just the two beta parts of my 4 possible alleles. What I think is that I don't know what the alpha part is :( . On the link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HLA-DQ, you notice it says "some" common halotypes, so we can't assume that having a B1 0201 is for sure the 2.5 because we don't know what the alpha is.

Therefore, my interpretation of my results is that I am 2,2, but I don't know if I have both 2 copies of 2.5, 2 copies of 2.2 or one of each.

It looks like there are different understandings of all of this, I wonder how Enterolab would explain it? Has anyone asked?

Actually, my understanding and anyone feel free to correct me, is that the 0201 allele is the 2.5 which carries a higher risk. With 2.2 alone you are not predisposed to gluten sensitivity. There has to be another "at risk" gene. With 2.5 alone you are predisposed. However, in your case you have 2 of the same DQ 2 genes which puts you at really high risk regardless of whether it is 2.5 or 2.2. I only have 2.5 but my enterolab results were still relatively elevated even after 8 mos of gluten free living. And I definitely have multiple symptom relief off gluten. I did ask Enterolab about the gene interpretation and the response was that having DQ2 0201 alone predisposes you to gluten sensitivity and so they do not bother with the alpha chains. Kimball genetics does both beta and alpha but the cost is double or so. I'm waiting on my 2 sons gene testing with Kimball and Enterolab stool testing. It will be interesting to see. I have a mother with autoimmune hepatitis B which led to Grave's disease, an aunt with colitis, and multiple problems with depression, bipolar throughout my family. Arthritis is a biggy also.

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tipnpat, I'm curious where you found the information that the B1 0201 allele means 2.5. My impression is that the 5 part of this refers to the alpha allele and what it is specifically; since Enterolab hasn't tested this, how do I know if I am 2.5 or some other combination of 2?

But I admit I am still confused. I *think* I am in the highest risk category with double 2.5 but now am not sure.

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tipnpat, I'm curious where you found the information that the B1 0201 allele means 2.5. My impression is that the 5 part of this refers to the alpha allele and what it is specifically; since Enterolab hasn't tested this, how do I know if I am 2.5 or some other combination of 2?

But I admit I am still confused. I *think* I am in the highest risk category with double 2.5 but now am not sure.

Hello,

I recommend going to wikipedia and doing a search for HLA-DQ2 and reading that page. Also, go to the enterolab website and read the FAQ REsults interpretation page. Some of my info came from earlier posts in this topic too so I'm relying heavily on the more experienced ones. I keep reading and re-reading the info I can find and it seems each time I find something new. Being homozygous (having 2 of the same gene) however, does mean that you got one from each parent.

This was the response to my question from Enterolab:

"Thank you for your correspondence. Though there are some labs and practitioners who feel you must test the alpha heterodimer when an 0201 gene is present at the beta site to see if you also possess an 05xx allele at the alpha site, the doctor we work with at the American Red Cross has verified that this additional testing is not necessary. Having an 0201 and/or an 0302 (DQ8) gene already predisposes you to gluten sensitivity and Celiac, but it does not definitely mean you will manifest either GS or Celiac."

Hope this helps. Just keep reading.

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