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Deborah G

Continuous Diarrhea

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I'm new to the forum. I've had intestinal/colonic issues for many years, the last 3 years the most intense. I've had a number of surgeries on my colon. At a young age I had rectal prolapse. I was operated on twice in 4 years to correct it. Next came the sliding of hemorrhoidal tissue. I had it stapled last year. Worse than all these surgeries is what has occurred over the last 2 years - almost daily diarrhea and loose stools that simply slide out. I went gluten free over a year ago. Helped me a lot with the intestinal pain I was having but it hasn't stopped the constant diarrhea. I've had a colonoscopy - negative. I've been tested for intestinal bugs and worms - negative. The doctors are mystified by my condition. Now after reading some of the posts on the forum I'm thinking corn might be another offender in addition to gluten. I'm going to start eliminating it from my diet to see what happens but frankly, I'm wondering if constant diarrhea is something I'm going to have to live with the rest of my life. I've been athletic since childhood - long distance runner, 1/2 Ironman/Ironman triathlete, distance cyclist. I've been vegetarian since my late teens (though I began eating salmon, tilapia and grouper two years ago). I turned 50 in April. Apart from this health problem with diarrhea, I'm fit as a fiddle. I don't have weight issues. I'm high energy and full of pep. Imagine how discouraging it is to be running to the bathroom all day long and doing sports on top of it! I'm determined to keep my active lifestyle going. I just wish I could figure out what's causing the diarrhea. Any advice or insights would be greatly appreciated.

Deborah

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Deborah-

wow, hopefully your hunch on the corn is right and you will be feeling better soon!

you may want to consider some variation of an elimination diet, where you restrict food to 'safe' items (usually rice, meat and perhaps select veggies - yams are especially popular) for a time (few days to few weeks depending on what version you're following), then test various foods by adding them one at a time. Given how common fish is as an allergen, you might try just rice & yams briefly. Although it is rare, some people are allergic to rice, you will likely have a guess as to whether you are or not. Soy and dairy are two common culprits for many celiacs judging by postings on this forum.

a more 'paleo' or caveman diet (basically cooking whole foods from scratch) helps some (it did me), and you know exactly what you are eating.

corn products are in everything, check out one of the corn allergy websites for some hints.

Are you or is anyone in your family low on salt? before diagnosis, I once had a bad D bout (even liquid went straight through my bowels - well, a 15 minute delay from drinking to toilet) that didn't go away until my Dr. realized I was low on potassium; hours after my first prescription pill my bowels stabilized. Although I did lose weight rapidly that time, so hopefully that's not your issue!

good luck!

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Hi Deborah.

Unfortunately this is quite common. Often ones find that dropping gluten alone does not bring about the hoped-for recovery. There are often other foods that are also acting as antagonists. Whilst the gut remains damaged malabsorption of essential nutrients is a problem and it can also contribute to leaky gut syndrome which allows undigested particles through into the bloodstream setting up further intolerances or even allergies.

I learned very quickly that my problem was more than just gluten so I also dropped dairy, most carbohydrates and sugar from my diet - I thought, in for a penny, in for a pound, I might as well do this properly, and I was sure that Candida was a big contributor to my problems, so losing those foods could only be a beneficial move.

Often what seems to happen when people go gluten-free is that they replace the gluten-based carbohydrates with other carb foods which often are higher, both in carbohydrate value, and in sugar. They then find that they also become intolerant of those foods too.

The problem often seems to be that it is carbohydrates in general that are causing a lot of the problems. I am very carbohydrate intolerant. To counteract that I am following a low-carbohydrate regime which provides me with plenty of protein to help my body rebuild and restore the damage.

Many have found it beneficial to follow an elimination diet for a while. You start with a few basic foods that you are pretty confident you can tolerate - meat, fish, poultry, fresh vegetables and fruit. Some find that they can tolerate a little grain in the form of brown rice. After a week or so, you can then start to introduce other foods, one at a time, over 2 or 3 days, monitoring your reaction. It is good to try and rotate the foods as best you can to avoid building up further intolerances.

Once the offending foods are removed from the diet, the gut then is able to start to heal. It is annoying to have to limit the diet so severely, but in the long run it is far more effective at isolating the offender/s.

I have realised that I am a Metabolic 'Protein' type (I have discovered the Metabolic Typing Diet). Like a lot of people, I am a fast-oxidiser and my body needs to have plenty of purine-based proteins and little carbohydrate. Metabolically we are all different which is why no one diet fits all - Jack Sprat, good for the gander, and all that. We all function at different levels, and although some prefer to follow a vegetarian regime for personal reasons, not everyone's metabolism is suited to it. If we are eating the wrong type of foods for our type, we then end up throwing our body out of balance.

My bowels have gone through a gamut of reactions over the last 3 months since I started gluten-free - the diarrhea being the start of it all and improving radically after the removal of the gluten and dairy etc., but now I seem to have settled into a more normal pattern thank goodness, and am beginning to be able to tolerate a few more foods although I still have to watch the carbs and sugar.

I know what it is like to have to be tied to the bathroom, I too had IBS for years. I also suffer with fatigue though and certainly envy you your energy level. I have seen an odd glimpse of it since going gluten-free but that has yet to really come back to any decent level.

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I'm new to the forum. I've had intestinal/colonic issues for many years, the last 3 years the most intense. I've had a number of surgeries on my colon. At a young age I had rectal prolapse. I was operated on twice in 4 years to correct it. Next came the sliding of hemorrhoidal tissue. I had it stapled last year. Worse than all these surgeries is what has occurred over the last 2 years - almost daily diarrhea and loose stools that simply slide out. I went gluten free over a year ago. Helped me a lot with the intestinal pain I was having but it hasn't stopped the constant diarrhea. I've had a colonoscopy - negative. I've been tested for intestinal bugs and worms - negative. The doctors are mystified by my condition. Now after reading some of the posts on the forum I'm thinking corn might be another offender in addition to gluten. I'm going to start eliminating it from my diet to see what happens but frankly, I'm wondering if constant diarrhea is something I'm going to have to live with the rest of my life. I've been athletic since childhood - long distance runner, 1/2 Ironman/Ironman triathlete, distance cyclist. I've been vegetarian since my late teens (though I began eating salmon, tilapia and grouper two years ago). I turned 50 in April. Apart from this health problem with diarrhea, I'm fit as a fiddle. I don't have weight issues. I'm high energy and full of pep. Imagine how discouraging it is to be running to the bathroom all day long and doing sports on top of it! I'm determined to keep my active lifestyle going. I just wish I could figure out what's causing the diarrhea. Any advice or insights would be greatly appreciated.

Deborah

Deborah

I am 51 years old and at age 50 my gall bladder was diseased, only I wasn't aware of it because I didn't have symptoms of passing stones......but it was sending out bile (obviously not in normal amounts/intervals) and it irritated a pre-existing but unknown colitis condition I had. This resulted in diarrhea everytime I had a bowel movement (5-6 times a day). The diarrhea was controlled by Immodium and prescription of Cholestryamine. I had to have my gall bladder removed as my gall bladder was dangerously close to being infected.

Also see http://habbasyndrome.com/index.html for info on when the gall bladder is not necessarily diseased or infected, but is causing symptom of sudden diarrhea. Dr. Habbas also uses Cholestryamine for it.

This could be something to consider.

Deb

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Dear All,

Thank you for taking the time to share your experiences and insightful comments. I have always been interested in nutrition and have studied it on my own since I was very young. Given I am a high-performance/achieving amateur athlete, I have dedicated many years to experimenting with different ways of eating to enhance my athletic performance. The observation about carbs being a possible offender comes as no surprise since I noticed years ago that everytime I eat them, I feel "up" for about 20 minutes than crash "down" for much longer. Carbs, though considered excellent "fuel" for distance athletes, tend to depress my system more than provide it with energy. Nonetheless, I am guilty of eating carbohydrates in large quantities which I am now challenged to reconsider. I have no problem taking drastic measures to get this health abnormality under control (diarrhea). If cutting back on carbs is what it will take, I'm very motivated to do so. Rice is a large staple of my diet given my ethnic background is mediterranean. I grew up in a family where rice was eaten almost every day. I love brown rice and all products that contain it. In fact, to replace bread I buy rice tortillas at the Whole Food Store. They are gluten and dairy free. Now I'm thinking they may not be the right choice for me. I have also undergone metabolic testing. I fall inbetween, rated as "mixed". I did not find following my metabolic type recommended diet helped in any way. As for Imodium, I take one tablet every morning after my long distance run. It doesn't have much affect on controlling the diarrhea. My gall bladder is normal. I use sea salt in my food. There is no family history of low potassium. I don't consume dairy or soy. Both give me diarrhea.

In conclusion, thank you again for responding to my post and sharing your insights. I will pursue limiting my carb and rice intake for a week to see what reaction it brings. I seldom eat yams given they are high glycemic but heck, it's worth a try. Sugar consumption isn't a concern since I'm not big on sweets or sugary foods. Honestly, when I look at my diet and how healthy I eat, I'm truly perplexed as to why I'm having this terrible struggle with diarrhea. But it may just be driven by carbohydrates which I do consume so let's see what happens when I cut them out.

Thanks again to each of you for commenting on my concern.

Deborah

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Hi Deborah

I have to throw in my two cents worth on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. There is a thread here on it which seems to have slipped to page two.

I have been on this diet for over a month, started after a year gluten free. It includes meat, fish, poultry, vegs, fruit, nuts, honey, yogurt, cheese, butter and some kinds on beans. NO grains of any kind, no sugar, potatoes, soy or corn. It eliminates almost all processed food. You eat nothing with more than one or two ingredients on the label, except maybe hard cheese.

The idea behind it is to starve out bad gut bacteria and allow the damaged gut to heal by elinimating di- and poly saccharides that cannot be digested. I don't believe it will "cure" celiac disease but I hope it will clear up my still unpredictable digestion.

Anyway, it does seem to be helping me. And I love the all-you-can-eat feature. You can find out more by reading the book Breaking the Vicious Cycle or going to the website with the same name.

Good luck

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Dear All,

Thank you for taking the time to share your experiences and insightful comments. I have always been interested in nutrition and have studied it on my own since I was very young. Given I am a high-performance/achieving amateur athlete, I have dedicated many years to experimenting with different ways of eating to enhance my athletic performance. The observation about carbs being a possible offender comes as no surprise since I noticed years ago that everytime I eat them, I feel "up" for about 20 minutes than crash "down" for much longer. Carbs, though considered excellent "fuel" for distance athletes, tend to depress my system more than provide it with energy. Nonetheless, I am guilty of eating carbohydrates in large quantities which I am now challenged to reconsider. I have no problem taking drastic measures to get this health abnormality under control (diarrhea). If cutting back on carbs is what it will take, I'm very motivated to do so. Rice is a large staple of my diet given my ethnic background is mediterranean. I grew up in a family where rice was eaten almost every day. I love brown rice and all products that contain it. In fact, to replace bread I buy rice tortillas at the Whole Food Store. They are gluten and dairy free. Now I'm thinking they may not be the right choice for me. I have also undergone metabolic testing. I fall inbetween, rated as "mixed". I did not find following my metabolic type recommended diet helped in any way. As for Imodium, I take one tablet every morning after my long distance run. It doesn't have much affect on controlling the diarrhea. My gall bladder is normal. I use sea salt in my food. There is no family history of low potassium. I don't consume dairy or soy. Both give me diarrhea.

In conclusion, thank you again for responding to my post and sharing your insights. I will pursue limiting my carb and rice intake for a week to see what reaction it brings. I seldom eat yams given they are high glycemic but heck, it's worth a try. Sugar consumption isn't a concern since I'm not big on sweets or sugary foods. Honestly, when I look at my diet and how healthy I eat, I'm truly perplexed as to why I'm having this terrible struggle with diarrhea. But it may just be driven by carbohydrates which I do consume so let's see what happens when I cut them out.

Thanks again to each of you for commenting on my concern.

Deborah

Hi Deborah

Even though you have been tested as 'Mixed', there are various levels of this. You can either be a mixed who tends towards carbs or a mixed who tends towards protein, or you fall right in the middle. Although you have a Mediterranean background other factors within your genetic make-up may have influenced your metabolism towards a different level. Apparently the metabolism can also sometimes change depending on other factors - perhaps your level of Atleticism demands more protein.

I was reading in one of the books I have about a chap who was in a sports team. Everyone else was fit and well on the high carb regime but he was tired and sluggish. He was tested and found to be a Protein type. Once his diet was adjusted he regained his strength and stamina.

I kind of feel though with you that although perhaps you could try more of a lean towards protein, my instinct, especially in view of the fact that you still have a high energy level, suggests to me that some other food is affecting you, setting up further intolerance and stopping gut healing. Likely the only way to really find that out is to do the elimination diet for a few weeks to see if you can pinpoint what it is. Although rice is not normally a problem, the fact that it is a staple in your diet may have created a problem.

It's a bit of a trial and error situation but I hope you manage to figure it out eventually.

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I use sea salt in my food. There is no family history of low potassium.

In conclusion, thank you again for responding to my post and sharing your insights. I will pursue limiting my carb and rice intake for a week to see what reaction it brings. But it may just be driven by carbohydrates which I do consume so let's see what happens when I cut them out.

Thanks again to each of you for commenting on my concern.

Deborah

Hey, good luck in your quest.

Do you know if you have 'normal' thyroid activity? most sea salt doesn't have iodine in it (unlike commercially processed salt); depending on how much seafood you eat there could maybe be some relation??? Others know a lot more about minerals, absorption, etc. than I do.

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Deborah,

I had continuing problems with D even after eliminating grains and several other foods.

Something that worked perfectly for me and several others that I know of is is to take Caltrate 600 with vitamin D--two per day with breakfast and dinner. (your ideal amount may vary)

Since it's a poorly absorbed form of the mineral, a lot of it gets eliminated and as it travels through it firms things up considerably. I am not exagerating when I say it was a miracle for me.

It doesn't take the place of a careful diet and avoiding the things you are sensitive to. I was doing everything right, had every test known to man, did a doctor-supervised elimination diet and still had some issues with D.

It may be worth a try--you will know pretty quickly if it will work for you, and the calcium won't hurt you.

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Dear All,

I wish to thank all of you again for engaging with me in such a mature and thoughtful discussion. Your comments, based on your own actual health experiences, are giving me much food for thought.

I have been tested over the last two-four years for every possible condition colo-rectal surgeons intially seek to rule out. My thyroid is normal as are all of my internal organs. My small and large intestine draw attention given they are more tortuous than the average. Nonetheless, they have been scoped through and through. Nothing abnormal discovered. My sister-in-law, a family medicine doctor, tends to think I am suffering some kind of lower bowel/rectal structural problem resulting from the numerous surgeries I have had in the past, thus causing the stools to be loose. It's a theory, maybe yes, maybe no.

I tend to agree with the comment that there is something else I am consuming which is irritating my system, impeding my gut to heal itself. If only I could isolate this offending food (s), how easy it would be to eliminate it from my daily diet.

The Caltrate 600 D is novel. I have taken Calcium Citrate many times but never Caltrate 600 with D. Anything that will "bind" my system is worth a try. Thanks for sharing this thought with me.

My energy level has not been affected as far as I can tell. What I can say is that running to the bathroom all day long makes me very tired. It also depresses me which further leads to fatigue and exhaustion. I try to remain positive each new day. I tell myself at some point I will come clear on what is causing this. Right now, however, I do struggle on an emotional level with this unglamorous health condition.

Deborah

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Deborah-

hang in there.

at least your doctors are listening to you, I have a friend with GI issues and her doctor said "well, your tests are normal, it must be the three Fs - Female, Fair, and over Fifty" (!)

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Deborah-

hang in there.

at least your doctors are listening to you, I have a friend with GI issues and her doctor said "well, your tests are normal, it must be the three Fs - Female, Fair, and over Fifty" (!)

Coo, that's flattering - mine said the four F's - Female, Fair, Fat and over Forty! Thanks Mate! Hasn't anyone stopped to wonder why it happens to women of that age and over? What a cop out. How do they explain it away if you are Male, Dark, Thin and Twenty-five?

Actually I am only fair because I have gone grey and use a blonde color - otherwise I would be dark Auburn - maybe that's what did it, let's all blame the blonde hair dye. Having GI problems obviously is caused by being blonde whether natural or synthetic. Next time I'll get an Auburn dye - maybe my problems will go away when I am no longer fair...........

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At first my digestion improved dramatically; then this year it started to go south again. I remembered that years ago I was tested (after an anaphylactic episode) for food allergies, and they told me I had "mild" reactions to bananas, apples and green beans. The allergist looked baffled and said that if i hadn't had any reactions to those foods, to keep eating. So I did. Well, my husband reminded me lately that last summer, the green bean plants in our garden made me break out in hives. And we'd started having smoothies for breakfast with bananas in them.

When I cut out apples, bananas and green beans--the foods the allergist told me I 'probably' wasn't allergic to--my digestion went back on track. It's possible you have other food allergies or intolerances. You may want to make an appointment with an allergist to get a full food allergy workup.

It's rare, but even a dust mite allergy can cause diarrhea.

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It's rare, but even a dust mite allergy can cause diarrhea.

I'm so glad that you brought that up! Since going gluten-free, I sometimes have unexplained bouts of diarrhea and I had been focusing on "finding the hidden gluten" to no avail.

Years ago, when I was diagnosed with dust mite allergy, the allergist said that my reaction was the worst he had ever seen for that particular allergen. Since going gluten-free, my environmental allergy symptoms have almost disappeared and I haven't been as vigilant in my dust mite elimination efforts. You've given me a wake-up call, samcarter. Thanks!

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I'm so glad that you brought that up! Since going gluten-free, I sometimes have unexplained bouts of diarrhea and I had been focusing on "finding the hidden gluten" to no avail.

Years ago, when I was diagnosed with dust mite allergy, the allergist said that my reaction was the worst he had ever seen for that particular allergen. Since going gluten-free, my environmental allergy symptoms have almost disappeared and I haven't been as vigilant in my dust mite elimination efforts. You've given me a wake-up call, samcarter. Thanks!

You're welcome. I also have a severe allergy to dust mites, as did my brother (he was tested as a child, but never really treated, IMO). He died suddenly in his home, no warning. My parents refused a comprehensive autopsy; I suspect he died of anaphylaxis. His house was very dusty, he did not clean as he should have, due to having a demanding job and living alone. He also didn't take his allergies seriously. An anaphylactic reaction can come on suddenly, or mask as "not feeling quite right", until it's too late. When I had my anaphylactic episode I was lucky enough to be with a friend who had had similar reactions, and knew to get me to the hospital ASAP. My brother wasn't so lucky. :(

Since then I've done some research and there have been deaths due to dust mite anaphylaxis, it seems. It is a serious allergy that should be kept in mind along with food intolerances and allergies.

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A few of the last posters resonate with my issues on gluten/other fod intolerances and dust mite. I have not done any research but I imagine its likely that reactions to dust mite could be linked to gluten intolerance. If gluten is able to damage the gut wall and cause other foods to become reactive by stirring up the immune system, is it possible that dust mite allergy arises due to a damaged and reactive immune system. My intial issue was with dust mite, with illness but diagnosis took around 10 years (due to unusual symptoms of high fever). Gluten (along with other foods) came along 10 years after dust mite was picked up, but I also have reactions that seem to be affected by both dust and gluten (cold water hives).

Since I have been chasing the gluten diet and tracking other foods that cause issues, I have gotten complacent with dust mite, since I have taken good precautions against mites in the past, I has not bothered to check that all the mattress covers are still in good condition. This caught me out a few weeks ago and on the second set of symptoms I have hopefully fixed it. Why am I telling you all this?

I guess as a warning that because you find you react to something like gluten does not mean the others have gone (I know we all understand this but its easy to get less vigilant), as well as looking for other food/inhalant culprits that might cause a problem.

I am also curious to know if anyone has researched links between dust mite allergy and gluten intolerance, or do they both arise just because our immune systems are stuffed? I am hoping that over time on a gluten-free diet, my other issues will improve or dissappear. My research indicates that intolerances to other foods like milk, etc should ease after a year off gluten. Dust mite I have no idea.

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I have removed several posts from this topic that had nothing to do with celiac disease and were advocating an unsubstantiated and potentially dangerous "treatment" for diarrhea.

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I'm new to the forum. I've had intestinal/colonic issues for many years, the last 3 years the most intense. I've had a number of surgeries on my colon. At a young age I had rectal prolapse. I was operated on twice in 4 years to correct it. Next came the sliding of hemorrhoidal tissue. I had it stapled last year. Worse than all these surgeries is what has occurred over the last 2 years - almost daily diarrhea and loose stools that simply slide out. I went gluten free over a year ago. Helped me a lot with the intestinal pain I was having but it hasn't stopped the constant diarrhea. I've had a colonoscopy - negative. I've been tested for intestinal bugs and worms - negative. The doctors are mystified by my condition. Now after reading some of the posts on the forum I'm thinking corn might be another offender in addition to gluten. I'm going to start eliminating it from my diet to see what happens but frankly, I'm wondering if constant diarrhea is something I'm going to have to live with the rest of my life. I've been athletic since childhood - long distance runner, 1/2 Ironman/Ironman triathlete, distance cyclist. I've been vegetarian since my late teens (though I began eating salmon, tilapia and grouper two years ago). I turned 50 in April. Apart from this health problem with diarrhea, I'm fit as a fiddle. I don't have weight issues. I'm high energy and full of pep. Imagine how discouraging it is to be running to the bathroom all day long and doing sports on top of it! I'm determined to keep my active lifestyle going. I just wish I could figure out what's causing the diarrhea. Any advice or insights would be greatly appreciated.

Deborah

Deborah,

You are in the same boat as many people I have known prior to eating the Paleo Diet. It is likely, going from what you wrote above, the only solution. I didn't have leaky bowls but I have done the Paleo Diet now for 9 years and COULD NOT feel better. It's perfect. And very simple to follow after you research and get used to it, just like anything else in life.

You'd be happy to know the Paleo Diet removes corn and all kinds of other junk that will cause your stomach to rumble. Always remember to be weary of acidic foods as they can cause diarrhea, headaches, indigestion and gas.

Good luck with your dietary changes. The best thing is that you are online researching info and talking to others who share your plight. STAY focused!

John

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I am new to this forum. My 16 year old daughter just diagnosed Celiac. She also has had dust mite allergy/asthma and I wonder the same question. If going gluten free could take away the dust mite/asthma issue, thinking her system has been compromised for years and we didn't know it. Anyone else experienced celiac along with dustmite allergy and asthma?

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Deborah,

I had continuing problems with D even after eliminating grains and several other foods.

Something that worked perfectly for me and several others that I know of is is to take Caltrate 600 with vitamin D--two per day with breakfast and dinner. (your ideal amount may vary)

Since it's a poorly absorbed form of the mineral, a lot of it gets eliminated and as it travels through it firms things up considerably. I am not exagerating when I say it was a miracle for me.

It doesn't take the place of a careful diet and avoiding the things you are sensitive to. I was doing everything right, had every test known to man, did a doctor-supervised elimination diet and still had some issues with D.

It may be worth a try--you will know pretty quickly if it will work for you, and the calcium won't hurt you.

jerseyangel you were so right! i recently read this thread and have been on Caltrate 600 with vitamin D for about 2 weeks now and it IS a miracle. thank you! i'm celiac/ no dairy. it has really helped. so glad i found this thread.

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    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com